AP Human Geography
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Environmental Determinism: Crash Course #1

Today we're talking about how Human Geography has been practiced in the past, how it hitched its wagon to some really bad ideas, and how that kind of thinking still persists in the world today. Basically, we're starting with a lesson in how not to Human Geographize. Which I don't think is a real word.
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The 'Arab Spring': Five years on

The 'Arab Spring': Five years on | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Protesters took to the streets across the Arab world in 2011, pushing their leaders to end decades of oppression. The Middle East and North Africa was engulfed in an unprecedented outburst of popular protests and demand for reform. It began in Tunisia and spread within weeks to Egypt, Yemen, Bahrain, Libya and Syria.
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What is language extinction and why should we care?

What is language extinction and why should we care? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Almost half of the roughly 6,900 languages spoken around the world today are endangered. Scarily, the rate of extinction is accelerating and there is a whole lot at stake.
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17 Maps That Will Totally Change The Way You Look At The World

17 Maps That Will Totally Change The Way You Look At The World | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Prepare to doubt everything you've eve
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If The World Were 100 People

If the population of the world was only 100 people, what would society look like? How many people would have shelter? Clean water? Education?

Via Seth Dixon
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Ella Price's curator insight, March 28, 9:19 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 12:57 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

Denise Klaves Stewardson's curator insight, April 1, 4:06 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

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The Racial Dot Map: One Dot Per Person for the Entire U.S.

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China (not Mexico) is the top source of new immigrants to the U.S.

China (not Mexico) is the top source of new immigrants to the U.S. | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"In 2013, China replaced Mexico as the top sending country for immigrants to the United States. This followed a decade where immigration from China and India increased while immigration from Mexico decreased."


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Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:31 PM

Push and pull factors, and migration in relation to employment and quality of life-

This article explains how China in 2013 had more immigrants going to the US than Mexico. The reasons why were because of jobs and better life styles in the US.

This article represents push and pull factors, and migration in relation to employment and quality of life by showing why china had more immigrants going to the US because of job opportunities and better life styles.

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 20, 2015 10:18 PM

I can already imagine the reactions I would receive from a couple of people I know if I were to post something like this on Facebook. Too often, popular opinion trumps fact, which contributes to the continued existence of stereotypes and inherently racist beliefs/institutions. I find it particularly humorous that the bulk of anti-immigration sentiment is cast at the Hispanic-American population now knowing that they do not even compromise the largest immigrant populations now entering the country! It makes it painfully obvious that this hate of Hispanic immigrants held by many Americans is less about "job security" and more about racism. I will, however, point out that the census bureau doe not account for illegal immigration to my knowledge, and I would be interested to see how this would affect the data presented in this article. 

Mrs. Madeck's curator insight, October 1, 2015 5:57 PM

accompany "What is Normal" vidoe

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An Atlas of Upward Mobility Shows Paths Out of Poverty

An Atlas of Upward Mobility Shows Paths Out of Poverty | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
"A decades-old effort found that moving poor families to better neighborhoods did little to help them. A large new study is about to overturn the findings of Moving to Opportunity. Based on the earnings records of millions of families that moved with children, it finds that poor children who grow up in some cities and towns have sharply better odds of escaping poverty than similar poor children elsewhere."Tags: housing, economic, poverty, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.
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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


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Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 18, 2015 10:41 AM

This article discusses the Human Development Index (HDI), what it is, and how it is calculated. 

 

This chart displays that the top three spots on the HDI are occupied by Norway, Australia, and the Netherlands respectively, with the USA coming in fourth. As HDI is calculated by comparing aspects like literacy, standard of living, education, and life expectancy, why are two European countries and Australia in the top 3? Something to be looked at is the in-migration of each country. Immigrants arrival in large numbers in some countries can lower HDI if they are refugees or come from a country with a lower HDI, for they may be illiterate, have a low education, and therefore a low life expectancy. With in migration to the US tightly controlled but in constant motion, their HDI could be pulled down to 4th. As Norway and Australia and the Netherlands are not the main destination for refugees, their HDI could be higher.   

Cody Price's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:49 AM

The HDI is the human development index which ranks countries in many different aspects. The higher the country the more developed and modern it is. The least amount of death and the longest lives are here. It is more stable the higher the country.

 

This relates to the topic in unit 6 of HDI. this map shows the basic HDIS of the world and the patterns formed by the HDI layout of the world. 

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:04 AM

This map shows the Human Development Index around the world. The HDI depends on a set list of variables, ranking them from 1st to last. Nations considered to be "Western" are more developed than nations in regions such as Africa and Asia, although all nations are slowly but steadily developing, improving their Human Development Index ranking.

The HDI shows development in nations, although leaving out Inequality factors. This map also allows us to see spatially what regions tend to be more developed as well as developing.

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McDonald's serves WHAT in London?! The Outrageous Double-Standard in Fast Food.

McDonald's serves WHAT in London?! The Outrageous Double-Standard in Fast Food. | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
McDonald's serves WHAT in London?! The Outrageous Double-Standard in Fast Food. You'll be so mad.
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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, October 2, 2014 8:40 AM

seriously?!....

Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 2015 11:00 AM

Once again showing how different restaruants or global chains have changed depending on the country they are in and the cpnsumer culture. 

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16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World…

16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World… | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
“ What did your childhood bedroom look like? Chances are if you grew up in a westernized world, it had a solid bed, scattered toys, and wall decorations that creatively expressed the type of child you were, and hinted at the person you were to become. What you may have taken for granted, however, a large percent of others will never experience. There’s no right or wrong pertaining to living situations, but many unique lessons to be gained from acknowledging that the type of childhood one is given has an impressionable effect on their future.”
Via dilaycock, FCHSAPGEO, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks, Christopher L. Story
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dilaycock's curator insight, September 15, 2014 8:20 PM

What a great way to connect with students and discuss issues such as lifestyle, living standards, health etc.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 18, 2014 5:34 AM

Personal geographies - perspectives and worldviews

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Rosling's Factpod - Why did Ebola Spread in West Africa?

Excellent study tells how the spread of Ebola started in West Africa. Data source: http://www.sciencemag.org/content/345/6202/1369.full
Via Mathijs Booden, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks, Christopher L. Story
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New Human Geography Video Series

Miriam Nielsen will be teaching Human Geography on Crash Course. We'll talk about what Human Geography isn't, and what it is. Let's talk about humans in the context of our world.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 13, 1:40 PM

Yesterday the popular video channel Crash Course announced that they would be producing a new series dedicated to human geography, much to the delight of APHG teachers everywhere (some wished it were John Green hosting the series, but I say we should give Miriam Nielsen a chance to win us over).  I'm sure that as more videos are produced, I will tag them and include them here on Geography Education.    

 

Tags: APHG, teacher training, edtech, video.

Stephen Briddon's curator insight, October 14, 11:47 AM
Whoot
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Syrian Journey: Choose your own escape route - BBC News

Syrian Journey: Choose your own escape route - BBC News | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Put yourself in the shoes of a Syrian migrant and see whether you could make the right choices on the journey to Europe.
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'Language is a gift': Elders hold key to preserving Indigenous languages

'Language is a gift': Elders hold key to preserving Indigenous languages | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The way to preserve a language is to start the lessons at home. And listen to your elders. It's a conversation happening at a Winnipeg conference with First Nations leaders, elders and educators.
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The world’s most spoken languages

The world’s most spoken languages | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 17, 11:31 AM

This infographic is a great way to visualize the dominant languages on Earth.  Since this only counts one language per person, mother tongues are listed.  Consequently, lingua franca's such as English and France are smaller than you might have presumed them to be.  

 

Tags: language, culture, infographic.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, October 8, 2:39 AM
The world’s most spoken languages
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Why are there SO MANY mattress stores — and how do they stay in business?

Why are there SO MANY mattress stores — and how do they stay in business? | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The showrooms appear to always be empty -- how do they stay open?
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This is a great example of agglomeration and Central Place Theory!
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Simplified City Map

Simplified City Map | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Cartoons by John Atkinson. ©John Atkinson, Wrong Hands (by Wrong Hands)

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 18, 12:09 PM

Maybe this is not the next geographic model that will transform the discipline, but it is fun. 

 

Tags: urban, economic, urban models, funart.

Niall Conway's curator insight, March 16, 1:41 PM

Maybe this is not the next geographic model that will transform the discipline, but it is fun. 

 

Tags: urban, economic, urban models, fun, art.

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Romania's Geographic Challenge

Romania's Geographic Challenge | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Stratfor explains Romania's geographic challenge of remaining united while limiting the influence of larger surrounding powers. For more of these videos, visit http://arcg.is/1IeK3dT
Via Seth Dixon, Christopher L. Story
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AP Human Geography Review Material


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, May 7, 2015 10:42 AM

This is worth your while to look at HUGGERS!

Joy Kinley's curator insight, May 7, 2015 11:34 AM

For those of you needing AP Human Geography review this is a good one.

Michael Martin's curator insight, May 9, 2015 6:36 PM

Hey students:  Check out this Prezi for REVIEW. Yay!

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How American Agriculture Works

How American Agriculture Works | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
There really are two different Americas: the heartland, and the coasts....

Via Seth Dixon
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Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2015 2:38 PM

These maps are interesting, in the fact that the heartland of the United States differs so much from either coast.  Both the coasts, as seen in the first map grow fruits and vegetables.  The center of the country grows wheat, and wheat is the dominant  crop of the country.  This might account for the reason why fruits and vegetables are more expensive than grain based products.  The second map helps to drive home this point even further, of how different the coasts are from the heartland.  What I also thought was funny, however, was the author's comment that it looks like an electoral map.  Perhaps, the reason heartland states tend to side with each other and republicans is because of shared interests in the political arena.

Adriene Mannas's curator insight, March 22, 2015 10:24 AM

Unit 5 Agricultural and Rural Land Use

 

This picture and article talks about the main use of the agricultural growth in the United States. It shows how most and almost all of the agribusiness is in the growth of feed and food for animals on the ranches rather than humans. The amount of money made is astounding with how far the table tilts toward animal feed.

 

This relates to Human Geography because agriculture is one of the main points. It shows how people use agribusiness and ow it leans more toward the consumption of animals rather than humans. 

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, May 25, 2015 1:22 PM

This link consists of two maps that show agricultural land use in America. Nearly all of the "breadbasket region" is used not to feed people, but rather to create feed for cows and other animals. 

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Detroit by Air

Detroit by Air | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The stark contrast between the haves and have-nots is apparent from above, so too is the city’s rebound.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 7, 2014 9:18 PM

In the 1950s, Detroit was the 4th largest city in the U.S. with a booming population around 2 million as seen in some vintage footage of Detroit.  As the de-industrialization process restructured the US economy, globalization restructured the world’s economy, and Detroit’s local economic strategy crumbledDetroit was $18-20 million in debt with a population around 700,000 and is unable to pull out of this nosedive. The tax base shrunk, city services were spread thin and in 2013, Detroit filed for bankruptcy.  Today, some parts of Detroit are rebounding well while others are in absolute disarray.  These differences can, in part, be understood by using aerial photography and a spatial perspective.  


Tags: urban, economic, industry, Detroit

Dennis Swender's curator insight, December 10, 2014 4:23 PM

A multicultural research project:  by foot, by car, or by plane

Select your site:  Detroit?  Kansas City? Feguson? New York?

Take some pictures.  Start observing.  Interview some people.  Assemble some facts.   Justify your opinions. 

 

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 2, 2015 5:16 PM

Deindustrialization and globalization are some of the reason why Detroit fluctuates configurations in the geography of manufacturing. The reduction of production in the car industry and all activities along with it is harmful to Detroit’s citizens, leaving a lot of workers without jobs. Globalization was adopted and American companies became attracted to the very low wages of workers in other countries that produce similar quality products as the US. Unfortunately, since globalization became the preferred option for the US, deindustrialization in Detroit rapidly increased. On the other hand, with the continuing advancements in technology, it turns out to be manageable with a few employees. Wealthy Detroiters sprawl out in the suburbs out of the city.  Due to the elimination of manufacturing jobs and relocation of residents out of the state, Detroit city remains with a population of 700,000 people. The effect of deindustrialization has been devastating, not only for workers, but also for the city itself. The regions with the lowest population rate will find it hard to survive with the increase of infrastructure and less income in taxes.

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Old World Language Families Map - Maps on the Web

Old World Language Families Map - Maps on the Web | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
“ Old World Language Families Map”
Via Mr. David Burton
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MsPerry's curator insight, October 21, 2014 1:45 PM

APHG-Unit 3 Rubenstein Ch 5

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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before. Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment. Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.' The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa. Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed. On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."
Via Seth Dixon, Christopher L. Story
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Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 23, 2015 12:05 PM

I. Using the data from CIA Facebook, global post created a map illustrating the median ages of countries around the world. The world’s fifteen youngest countries are all located in Africa. The high number of teenagers in developed countries leads to youth unemployment which leads to the countries being “hampered by weak economies.” 

 

II. The distribution of ages effects countries by “weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.” Although countries with a fixed population of a young age can be detrimental, a country with an aging population can lead to a declining birth rate. This leads to labor shortages in the future which additionally stifles the economy.  

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:08 PM

Demographics seemingly started with age as a metric many years ago and have evolved into marketing tools, political footballs, and ways to combat everything from obesity to social security. Africa is clearly the youngest and probably for a very morbid reason; AIDS and Ebola among other diseases have taken their toll on the sexually active and thus have reduced the average age of their population.

Germany seems to be the place to go for a job as the labor shortage will mean higher wages for the folks who are left. Japan has another issue; a healthy aging population that will strain the government's ability to financially take care of them.

I wonder if the unevenness of Europe is an indication of the two World wars that were fought mostly on the turf. Did some countries lose more than others? If more soldiers, presumably of baby making age, perished did this affect the countries ability to keep pace with the Germany's and Spain's of Europe?

Diet seems to play a large part as well as the Mediterranean is well represented in terms of age. Does their healthy diet of fish, nuts, legumes and olive oil make a difference?

I could spend all day postulating, but I'll leave some of the findings for you to discover...

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 8:05 PM

The median age of a population call be a quite telling statistic--almost a surrogate for a population pyramid.  I post this with a special attention to Sub-Saharan Africa; the youngest 15 countries in the world are all in Africa, one of the major demographic realities confronting African economies and politics.  Here is a map with the median age of U.S. counties.


Tag: population, demographic transition model, population pyramids.