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World of Spycraft: Documents reveal NSA & CIA Spied on users in WoW, Xbox, Second Life & others

World of Spycraft: Documents reveal NSA & CIA Spied on users in WoW, Xbox, Second Life & others | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Snowden documents show intelligence agencies conducting surveillance and grabbing data in virtual worlds.

Via Gary Hayes
AJ A. Gildner's insight:

I have participated in many online games like World of Warcraft  and I have noticed how other players have reacted to this.  Ever since this information has been released, it has become a topic of conversation among many. especially those who play these games.  If this keeps happening, there could be many more problems for the NSA in the future, but maybe I will be proven wrong.

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Gary Hayes's curator insight, December 9, 2013 2:54 PM

Quote "

Games “are built and operated by companies looking to make money, so the players’ identity and activity is tracked,” said Peter W. Singer of the Brookings Institution, an author of “Cybersecurity and Cyberwar: What Everyone Needs to Know.” “For terror groups looking to keep their communications secret, there are far more effective and easier ways to do so than putting on a troll avatar.”

The surveillance, which also included Microsoft’s Xbox Live, could raise privacy concerns. It is not clear exactly how the agencies got access to gamers’ data or communications, how many players may have been monitored or whether Americans’ communications or activities were captured.

One American company, the maker of World of Warcraft, said that neither the NSA nor its British counterpart, the Government Communications Headquarters, had gotten permission to gather intelligence in its game. Many players are Americans, who can be targeted for surveillance only with approval from the nation’s secret intelligence court. The spy agencies, though, face far fewer restrictions on collecting certain data or communications overseas."

siobhan-o-flynn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 3:00 PM

not surprising, but still...

 

"Games “are built and operated by companies looking to make money, so the players’ identity and activity is tracked,” said Peter W. Singer of the Brookings Institution, an author of “Cybersecurity and Cyberwar: What Everyone Needs to Know.” “For terror groups looking to keep their communications secret, there are far more effective and easier ways to do so than putting on a troll avatar.”

The surveillance, which also included Microsoft’s Xbox Live, could raise privacy concerns. It is not clear exactly how the agencies got access to gamers’ data or communications, how many players may have been monitored or whether Americans’ communications or activities were captured.

One American company, the maker of World of Warcraft, said that neither the NSA nor its British counterpart, the Government Communications Headquarters, had gotten permission to gather intelligence in its game. Many players are Americans, who can be targeted for surveillance only with approval from the nation’s secret intelligence court. The spy agencies, though, face far fewer restrictions on collecting certain data or communications overseas...."

 
Alain Duménil's curator insight, December 11, 2013 4:41 AM

On n'est plus tranquille nulle part.

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Rescooped by AJ A. Gildner from Pervasive Entertainment Times
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World of Spycraft: Documents reveal NSA & CIA Spied on users in WoW, Xbox, Second Life & others

World of Spycraft: Documents reveal NSA & CIA Spied on users in WoW, Xbox, Second Life & others | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Snowden documents show intelligence agencies conducting surveillance and grabbing data in virtual worlds.

Via Gary Hayes
AJ A. Gildner's insight:

I have participated in many online games like World of Warcraft  and I have noticed how other players have reacted to this.  Ever since this information has been released, it has become a topic of conversation among many. especially those who play these games.  If this keeps happening, there could be many more problems for the NSA in the future, but maybe I will be proven wrong.

more...
Gary Hayes's curator insight, December 9, 2013 2:54 PM

Quote "

Games “are built and operated by companies looking to make money, so the players’ identity and activity is tracked,” said Peter W. Singer of the Brookings Institution, an author of “Cybersecurity and Cyberwar: What Everyone Needs to Know.” “For terror groups looking to keep their communications secret, there are far more effective and easier ways to do so than putting on a troll avatar.”

The surveillance, which also included Microsoft’s Xbox Live, could raise privacy concerns. It is not clear exactly how the agencies got access to gamers’ data or communications, how many players may have been monitored or whether Americans’ communications or activities were captured.

One American company, the maker of World of Warcraft, said that neither the NSA nor its British counterpart, the Government Communications Headquarters, had gotten permission to gather intelligence in its game. Many players are Americans, who can be targeted for surveillance only with approval from the nation’s secret intelligence court. The spy agencies, though, face far fewer restrictions on collecting certain data or communications overseas."

siobhan-o-flynn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 3:00 PM

not surprising, but still...

 

"Games “are built and operated by companies looking to make money, so the players’ identity and activity is tracked,” said Peter W. Singer of the Brookings Institution, an author of “Cybersecurity and Cyberwar: What Everyone Needs to Know.” “For terror groups looking to keep their communications secret, there are far more effective and easier ways to do so than putting on a troll avatar.”

The surveillance, which also included Microsoft’s Xbox Live, could raise privacy concerns. It is not clear exactly how the agencies got access to gamers’ data or communications, how many players may have been monitored or whether Americans’ communications or activities were captured.

One American company, the maker of World of Warcraft, said that neither the NSA nor its British counterpart, the Government Communications Headquarters, had gotten permission to gather intelligence in its game. Many players are Americans, who can be targeted for surveillance only with approval from the nation’s secret intelligence court. The spy agencies, though, face far fewer restrictions on collecting certain data or communications overseas...."

 
Alain Duménil's curator insight, December 11, 2013 4:41 AM

On n'est plus tranquille nulle part.

Rescooped by AJ A. Gildner from Cultural Geography
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Why So Many Icelanders Still Believe in Invisible Elves

Why So Many Icelanders Still Believe in Invisible Elves | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
How the country’s history and geography created the perfect setting for magical creatures, whose perceived existence sparks environmental protests to this day. 

Via Seth Dixon
AJ A. Gildner's insight:

In my AP Human Geography class, we have discussed the varying factors beween cultures.  I think this is one of the most interesting factors because it also adds to the history and foundation of a culture.  Personally, I would like to know the reasons, for believing or disbelieving in this existence of "elves", from locals.  This belief could cause much grief for construction of the island in the future.  However, I do not believe this a big problem, because I'm sure that many people around the world would be interested in these stories (I know I am).  Someday, when I go to Iceland, I will remember this article and surely will try and seek out these fantastic creatures.  

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 30, 2013 9:32 AM

I was discussing the Norwegian tradition of trolls and fantastical creatures with a friend who lived there for a few years.  She said that she doesn't believe in trolls when she's in the United States, but "when you are in those mountains with the rocks and trees, how can you not imagine that they might exist?" 

Rescooped by AJ A. Gildner from Daily Magazine
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Why China is building a massive solar power plant in the middle of nowhere

Why China is building a massive solar power plant in the middle of nowhere | AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Back in 2009 when China announced it would build the world’s largest photovoltaic power plant in the Mongolian desert, it choose a US company, First Solar, to construct the 2,000-megawatt (MW) project.

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
AJ A. Gildner's insight:

This article is a good example of the globalization that is spreading across the earth.  I am interested to see how this project will continue later on.  I do question, though, how other american companies are reacting to being put in second place now.  Even at that, the new largest photovoltaic power plant in the world is being constructed by an american company.  I hope that the reason for the construction of these power plants will stay the same over time and will reach the goal it is intended to.

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