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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, January 28, 9:24 PM

This is where you start to find out what types of things are more important to you.  Very interesting.  

Bharat Employment's curator insight, Today, 1:13 AM

www.bharatemployment.com

HumdeBut's curator insight, Today, 4:15 AM

pas vraiment à jour, mais les comparaisons sont souvent étonnantes !

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Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. 
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 9, 8:09 AM

This video (like part 1) shows some great examples of how the political organization of space and administration of borders can get complicated.  Here are the examples (and time in the video when they are covered in the video) on these complex borders:


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, video.

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HarperCollins omits Israel from maps for Mideast schools, citing ‘local preferences’

HarperCollins omits Israel from maps for Mideast schools, citing ‘local preferences’ | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it

"For months, publishing giant HarperCollins has been selling an atlas it says was developed specifically for schools in the Middle East. It trumpets the work as providing students an 'in-depth coverage of the region and its issues.  Its stated goals include helping kids understand the 'relationship between the social and physical environment, the region’s challenges [and] its socio-economic development.' Nice goals. But there’s one problem: Israel is missing."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 9:41 AM

In other words, Israel got eliminated from this atlas that was designed to cater to Middle Eastern countries that take umbrage with the fact that Israel...exists.  Making maps always has political overtones and the company is now realizing that you can't please everyone with different versions for distinct audiences.  Now, HarperCollins has pulled the book and will pulp all remaining versions of the atlas.  


Tags: Israel, social media, political, mapping, cartography.

Sabah's curator insight, January 8, 10:36 AM

I think that this interesting, and it reminds of how in map head it said that google earth puts borders in different places for different countries to avoid contreversy

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:11 PM

unit 1!

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2014 State Population: Rise of South and West Continues | Newgeography.com

2014 State Population: Rise of South and West Continues | Newgeography.com | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it
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Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities

Beginning in the 1950s, cities demolished thousands of homes in walkable neighborhoods to make room for freeways.
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The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water

The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it
Thanks to the worst drought in eight decades, millions of people in São Paulo are facing water outages.

 

Tags: Brazil, urban, water, urban ecology, climate change, environment depend, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 23, 2014 12:30 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This map shows the time lapse of a lake in Sao Paulo in Brazil and shows how the water is running low.

This relates to unit 1 because it shows the maps as It is a GPS map and a GIS layering map. This a basic definable part of this unit because of its maps, scale, sense of place, identity, and overall relativity. This is a simple GIS layering map over the Jaguari resovoir.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 23, 2014 4:59 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:49 PM

Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paulo, which provides one third of the countries GPD, is now running low or water due to one of the worst droughts in 8 years. There are more than 21 million people in this city and 13 million of them are facing water outages. If it doesn't rain soon, the city could face a collapse. The city has blamed the drought of lack of water in the vapor clouds that the amazon usually provides to the city. They also blame it on deforestation and global warming. President Dilma Rousseff has questioned the cities misusage of their water supply, claiming that the city mismanaged their water supply.  

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A liter of acid can destroy someone's life

A liter of acid can destroy someone's life | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it
Almost 10 years ago, a young Pakistani woman was held down by her mother-in-law while her husband and father-in-law threw acid on her. Some 150 operations later, Bushra Shafi is working as a beautician in a hair salon in Lahore, started by a hairdresser who was moved to help victims of acid attacks when one of them came into her salon and asked simply: "Can you make me beautiful again?"
 
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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 6:18 PM

The things that many of these woman have gone through is unimaginable, but knowing that there are people out there that are willing to help these women, essentially, rebuild their lives is amazing. Crimes like this often go unpunished which is sad and a symbol of how the justice system in certain countries are horrible and have obvious biases. Hopefully we can get more people who take the welfare of others into consideration and make the world a better place.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 4:39 PM

Acid attacks against women are a shocking problem in South Asia, and easy access to acid paired with low conviction rates means its a large problem in Pakistan. The region has many gender issues with the suppression of women's rights, but this shows one of the worst aspects of it. The fact that throwing acid on a woman wasn't a crime until a few years ago shows the lack of support women have in Pakistani society.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:10 PM

This article successfully covers the difficult and at times horrific experience many women have in the world. In this situation this woman was disfigured by acid and now is unable to really fit within a social circle. The government of Pakistan seems uninterested in tanking any firm action against these horrific acts and it seems simply because of how cheap and easy they are to carry out they will remain a danger for many women.

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How was the AIDS epidemic reversed?

How was the AIDS epidemic reversed? | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it

"If ever there was a demonstration of the power of science, it is the course of the fight billed 'Mankind v AIDS'. Until 1981 the disease (though already established in parts of Africa) was unknown to science. Within a decade it passed from being seen as primarily a threat to gay men, and then to promiscuous heterosexuals, to being a plague that might do to some parts of Africa what the Black Death did to medieval Europe. But now, though 1.6m people a year still die of it, that number is on a downward trajectory­, and AIDS rarely makes the headlines any more. How was this achieved?  The answer has two parts: sound science and international co-operation."


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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 2014 1:51 PM

The story of AIDS, and of AIDS in Africa, is actually multiple stories. The perseverance of her people, the willingness (now) to put it on the front burner, sharing of information and technology all help to reduce the numbers of the dying.  HIV victims are living longer. Drugs are improving. Distribution of drugs is improving.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 9:20 PM

The worldwide HIV/AIDS epidemic has the weight of researchers, clinicians, NGOs and governments working hard to reverse the epidemic. However, despite the success in increasing the number of people on treatment and reducing the overall rate of infection, still millions of people are continuing to be infected every year. So there is no time for complacency here. People living with HIV face many health issues and stigma from others, despite the good news that with treatment they can have a longer life than before.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 10:16 AM

Western broadcasting television has done a great job at Demonizing the African Continent. Not only do they portray the Continent as one country sharing the same cultural experience, they have also done a great job as portraying the continent as one that is ridding with diseases, and poverty. One thing they often neglect to do is highlight the great strides African countries are making to combat these diseases. The country would be able to conquer more infectious diseases such as malaria and cholera if they had the proper medical equipment to do so. 

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These Are The Most Googled Halloween Costumes In Each State

These Are The Most Googled Halloween Costumes In Each State | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it
Some states are making a topical Halloween choice this year, opting for Frozen costumes or dressing as the mythical Slenderman. Others will keep it classic, dressing as doctors or cheerleaders.

This map, made by SumoCoupon, a website that offers d...
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Feeding the Whole World

"Louise Fresco argues that a smart approach to large-scale, industrial farming and food production will feed our planet's incoming population of nine billion. Only foods like (the scorned) supermarket white bread, she says, will nourish on a global scale."


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Marianne Naughton's curator insight, October 19, 2014 12:07 PM

Feed The World ...

dilaycock's curator insight, October 19, 2014 6:45 PM

Fresco argues that we tend to see "home-made" agriculture as a thing of beauty, whereas the reality is that many small scale farmers struggle and live a subsistence lifestyle. The adoration of small-scale farming, notes Fresco, is a luxury to those who can afford it. Large-scale production has increased the availability and affordability of food. Food production should be given as high a priority as climate change and sustainability, and we should seriously consider ways in which land can be used as a multi-purpose space that includes agriculture.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 24, 2014 10:55 AM

Louise Fresco speaks of local food production and small scale control

and the entire food nework

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Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country

Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it
A new analysis of sea levels and flood risk around the world offers more evidence that the brunt of climate change will not be borne equally.

 

More than a quarter of Vietnam’s residents live in areas likely to be subject to regular floods by the end of the century.  Globally, eight of the 10 large countries most at risk are in Asia.  These figures are the result of a new analysis of sea levels and flood risk around the world, conducted by Climate Central and based on more detailed sea-level data than has previously been available.  The analysis offers more evidence that the countries emitting the most carbon aren’t necessarily the ones that will bear the brunt of climate change.  

 

Tags: Southeast Asia, water, disasters, urban ecology, coastal, climate change. 


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Garry Rogers's curator insight, October 9, 2014 2:18 PM

The cost of these and other consequences of global warming will not be born by the few growing rich on the industries causing the problems. The cost will be born by the people working to produce the profit.

Eben Lenderking's curator insight, October 10, 2014 10:03 AM

Fascinating study on the flood impact of climate change

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 15, 2014 5:14 PM

In this article the author discusses the risk of flooding in many different locations of the world. He claims about 2.6 percent of the world's populations. That's a big percentage considering all the people of the planet. 

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How Russia Destroyed the Aral Sea

How Russia Destroyed the Aral Sea | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it
Satellite photos show how the depredations of dictators have turned the world’s fourth largest inland sea into a poisonous desert.
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Where China and Kazakhstan Meet

Where China and Kazakhstan Meet | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it

"While people often say that borders aren’t visible from space, the line between Kazakhstan and China could not be more clear in this satellite image. Acquired by the Landsat 8 satellite on September 9, 2013, the image shows northwestern China around the city of Qoqek and far eastern Kazakhstan near Lake Balqash.

The border between the two countries is defined by land-use policies. In China, land use is intense. Only 11.62 percent of China’s land is arable. Pressed by a need to produce food for 1.3 billion people, China farms just about any land that can be sustained for agriculture. Fields are dark green in contrast to the surrounding arid landscape, a sign that the agriculture is irrigated. As of 2006, about 65 percent of China’s fresh water was used for agriculture, irrigating 629,000 square kilometers (243,000 square miles) of farmland, an area slightly smaller than the state of Texas.

The story is quite different in Kazakhstan. Here, large industrial-sized farms dominate, an artifact of Soviet-era agriculture. While agriculture is an important sector in the Kazakh economy, eastern Kazakhstan is a minor growing area. Only 0.03 percent of Kazakhstan’s land is devoted to permanent agriculture, with 20,660 square kilometers being irrigated. The land along the Chinese border is minimally used, though rectangular shapes show that farming does occur in the region. Much of the agriculture in this region is rain-fed, so the fields are tan much like the surrounding natural landscape."

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, food, agriculture, agricultural land change.


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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, September 18, 2014 5:26 AM

what a difference a govt makes!

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 24, 2014 2:38 PM

This photo shows what happens when a government is dedicated to developing agricultural industry. With a population so large it is critical that they capitalize on all their irritable land and there for that is why the border is so drastically different. In China they need the land to be used when it is possible.  

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 2:11 PM

The border between Kazakhstan and China holds stark contrasts. The Kazakh side is barren desert, with almost no agricultural or transportation system development. On the other side, agricultural plots are squished right up to the border, and an urban center sits right off of the border. When a country has a population of over a billion people, it needs to produce food for those people. China uses almost all of the land it can to grow food, and it has shelled out money in order to make desolate landscapes with little agricultural potential into productive areas. Kazakhstan has a relatively small population with little economic development, so it does not need to utilize and manipulate marginal lands in order to continue growth. 

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How American Agriculture Works

How American Agriculture Works | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it
There really are two different Americas: the heartland, and the coasts....

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 4:46 PM

My uncles in Iowa grow corn for ethanol.  They have a small crop where they grow corn they consume.  It is literally the best corn I've ever had.  I'm actually surprised Rhode Island produces almost $4mil in sweet corn.  I'm amazed that Mass produces $100 mil in cranberries.  I've seen a few cranberry bogs close down.  We produce so much why can't we actually feed everyone?  

Diane Johnson's curator insight, January 28, 8:47 PM

Useful data for sustainability discussions

Bob Beaven's curator insight, Today, 2:38 PM

These maps are interesting, in the fact that the heartland of the United States differs so much from either coast.  Both the coasts, as seen in the first map grow fruits and vegetables.  The center of the country grows wheat, and wheat is the dominant  crop of the country.  This might account for the reason why fruits and vegetables are more expensive than grain based products.  The second map helps to drive home this point even further, of how different the coasts are from the heartland.  What I also thought was funny, however, was the author's comment that it looks like an electoral map.  Perhaps, the reason heartland states tend to side with each other and republicans is because of shared interests in the political arena.

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Inside The Indiana Megadairy Making Coca-Cola's New Milk

Inside The Indiana Megadairy Making Coca-Cola's New Milk | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it
Coca-Cola got a lot of attention in November when it announced it was going into the milk business. In fact, its extra-nutritious milk product was invented by some dairy farmers in Indiana.

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Jeff Cherry's curator insight, January 12, 9:06 AM

This operation is in Indiana where I'm from.  Farming is big time here!

Brian Wilk's curator insight, January 22, 6:38 PM

I work for PepsiCo and Coca-Cola needed to do this to stay competitive with us. We distribute Muscle Milk and have had a head start on this growing beverage segment for the consumer looking for protein. Hopefully KO can generate a successful product and challenge their main rivals to come up with a better product so that the consumer can win. Our product is also shelf stable and could be a viable alternative to help with the war on hunger in less developed countries. Here's hoping for KO to be in the game and for PEP to rise to the challenge!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:25 PM

unit 5

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Dramatic Confluences

Dramatic Confluences | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it

"Confluences occur wherever two streams come together. If the gradient is low (i.e., nearly level) and the properties of the two streams are very different, the confluences may be characterized by a dramatic visible distinction as the mixing occurs only slowly."

 

Tags:  physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.


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Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, January 7, 5:47 AM

Wonderful pictures of rivers confluences

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Who Really Crosses the U.S.-Mexico Border?

The total number of unauthorized immigrants apprehended is on the rise, but they're no longer coming from America's nearest neighbor.
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Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques

Incredible images capture dazzling symmetry of Iran's mosques | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it

"Self-taught Iranian photographer gains rare access to shoot religious buildings as they've never been seen.  It's a side of Iran the rest of the world doesn't normally get to see -- the kaleidoscopically brilliant interiors of the country's intricately designed mosques.With beautiful mosaics and stained glass framed by powerful architecture, the buildings are astounding."

 

Tags: religion, culture, Islam, Iran, Middle East.


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Adriene Mannas's curator insight, December 12, 2014 11:08 AM

Unit 3

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:30 PM

It is interesting to see how the social and cultural factors surrounding Iranian mosques posed barriers to taking these pictures. The pictures show the beauty and colors of these mosques, showing how important they are to their history and society.

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, January 4, 6:43 PM

Often the normal American has trouble understanding what other religions are and mean. Seeing the architecture of that place may help to develop a deeper understanding of the religion. In this case, many Islamic norms can be seen in this mosques, for instance there are no pictures or representation of the human form. Architecture is an important way for religions to express them selves and allow others to learn more about them.

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40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities

40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it
Just how much of the world's cropland can we really call urban? That's been a big mystery until now.

 

Now, a study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters has an answer: Somewhere around 1.1 billion acres is being cultivated for food in or within about 12 miles (20 kilometers) of cities. Most of that land is on the periphery of cities, but 16.6 percent of these urban farms are in open spaces within the municipal core.


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:43 PM

Is this a surprise?

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:57 PM

Unit 1-Nature and perspectives on geography

 

This article explains how rural and urban areas are in the same nature. rural lands and urban lands are close or combined with each other though farms. These farms are affecting cities when they are so close from the sharing of resources. Water is a problem in these places through water scarcity. Places already with lack of water now are sharing with farms just outside the city. 

 

This relates to the unit through judging both perspectives or rural and urban societies working and living together. The urban societies are affected especially when water is a problem alone and then has to be shared with farms. People have noticed many farms are near cities with 80 percent of these rural lands near urban civilizations. Although many people have different views on what is considered urban,  and if these farms really are in urban areas. 

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, November 30, 2014 10:04 PM

Unit 5 Agricultural and Rural Land Use

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Urban infrastructure gets a second life

Urban infrastructure gets a second life | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it
Railroad beds become parks, power plants become aquariums and slaughterhouses are now art centers as an industrial past turns people-centric.

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Linguistic Family Tree

Linguistic Family Tree | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it

"When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor. An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian).  Minna Sundberg, creator of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent, a story set in a lushly imagined post-apocalyptic Nordic world, has drawn the antidote to the boring linguistic tree diagram."


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Linda Denty's curator insight, November 9, 2014 7:31 PM

A really wonderful graphic.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:21 AM

Linguistic Family Tree

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:50 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes (Language)

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Baltimore's painted screens

"Jan Crawford explores a unique folk art tradition going back 100 years - once seen on nearly every row house in the working class neighborhoods of Baltimore, as artists today once again embrace the tradition of painted window screens, an authentic connection to the city's past."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 23, 2014 12:27 PM

This is tremendous example of an urban cultural landscape that is distinctive to a certain place (Baltimore) and a particular time period.  The practice of painting landscape scene on window screens began over 100 years ago, as a way to beat the heat, but still afford some form of privacy.  This aesthetic emerged out of particular set of cultural, technological, and economic factors. What was once common is now perceived as a folk art that is a worth preserving because it is a marker of the local heritage.  This is an excellent example to demonstrate a sense of place that can develop within a community.  This video has been added to my ESRI StoryMap that spatially organizes place-based videos for the geography classroom (68 and counting).   

Tags: place, landscapeart, folk cultures, videoculture, community.

Kevin Barker's curator insight, October 24, 2014 9:22 AM

An excellent example of a localized cultural landscape characteristic that is a result of cultural diffusion that formed for economic as well as environmental factors.

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Where Are the Hardest Places to Live in the U.S.?

Where Are the Hardest Places to Live in the U.S.? | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it
There are various ways to evaluate living standards, but by many of them, eastern Kentucky comes out at or near the bottom.
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Major European Country To Recognize State Of Palestine

Major European Country To Recognize State Of Palestine | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it
STOCKHOLM, Oct 3 (Reuters) - Sweden's new center-left government will recognize the state of Palestine in a move that will make it the first major European country to take the step, Prime Minister Stefan Lofven said on Friday. ...
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Hong Kong’s umbrella revolution

Hong Kong’s umbrella revolution | AP Human Geography at West High School | Scoop.it
The story behind the Hong Kong pro-democracy protests

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Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, October 8, 2014 2:52 PM

What caught my attention was the name that this protest has ("umbrella revolution”). After investigating I could find why this protest has that name, the reason is  because the people who are protesting  used umbrellas to protect themselves from tear gas.The Occupy Central movement ( which is  a civil disobedience campaign initiated by Benny Tai Yiu-ting, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Hong Kong , and advocated by Occupy Central with Love and Peace) threatens to block financial and commercial center of Hong Kong if their demands are neglected: the resignation of the Chief Executive, Leung Chun-ying and the possibility of holding truly democratic elections in 2017. If none of the parties can agree I think there will be any solution for both parties and this will continue.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, October 10, 2014 2:56 PM

The umbrella revolution in Hong Kong is simply that Protestants are using all kind of tools to block the tear gas that the police are pulling them. Protests in Hong Kong are to change some of the rules that Beijing has also want Leung Chun-ying resign his position. The vast majority of the protesters are young and who began the protests were also young people who are fighting for the good of their city.