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Do you know Africa?

Do you know Africa? | AP HUG | Scoop.it

Many of Africa’s leaders will be in town next week attending a White House summit. The continent’s land is shared among 49 countries — many of which rarely make U.S. headlines. How familiar are you with Africa’s geography?


Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 2015 3:41 PM

http://lizardpoint.com/geography/africa-quiz.php

This is easier because it shows you the shape of the countries. As for this quiz, I can locate any African country but some of them, not precisely. I'm able to locate Ethiopia, Libya and Angola obviously because they're bigger but not Togo, Eritrea and Rwanda. However, I can closely locate the smaller countries but not precisely.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 2015 5:21 PM

I love interactive maps like this.  These are the best way to learn where things are in the world geographically.  Africa is the toughest, for myself, continent in the world to be able to locate and identify where certain countries are.  This is in part because Africa has so many countries and also Africa is a part of the world that is not often taught in school, therefore you have limited thoughts and ideas about these types of areas.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 22, 2015 1:54 PM

I have always been fascinated with Africa and its history. Through its history one can understand why Africa is the way it is today. Its a shame that Africa does not have more of a focus in the Public School Curriculum. Its played a huge part in developing western civilization, whether it be in ancient Alexandria providing grain for the Roman Republic or the coltan extracted through inhumane means in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Africa is a continent that has been raped and torn in a repetitive manor under a variety of foul experiences brought upon by western countries. These are the same western countries that are held of high interest and regards in subject manor instituted in the Public School System. Africa has also been apart of amazing developments of human civilization, for example the Trans Saharan Trade Route which linked Kingdoms such as Ancient Ghana to dynasties far in the Middle East. It is also the birthplace of man (no big deal). In either case there needs to be a stronger push on teaching/molding "Africa" (yes, I know... broad) into the curriculum. It is important in both understanding the history of the world, specifically western civilization and how it coined itself  “civilized.” Through introducing basic aspects, history, and dilemmas (both old and modern) it could inspire more interest and an expansion of knowledge from student to student. School is and will most likely continue to be Euro-centric and have large flares of Americana and other “themes” of North America. 

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Worst Hurricane

Worst Hurricane | AP HUG | Scoop.it

"What's the worst Hurricane anyone in your town remembers?""


Via Seth Dixon, ApocalypseSurvival, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks, Nancy Watson
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 24, 2014 7:59 PM

Andrew  was bad, Katrina was most memorable

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 21, 2014 1:24 AM

The worst Hurricane that I remember is Hurricane "Katrina" in 2005. I was living in Puerto Rico but I remember seen the devastating news. The largest number of deaths occurred in New Orleans, which was flooded because its levee system failed. Also "Katrina" was the hurricane that has caused more economic damage as well as one of the five deadliest hurricanes, in the history of the United States. It was a very sad event. I hope that does not happen again.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, October 29, 2014 1:51 PM

My father is actually good friends with a guy who he went to school with that specifically help clean up after natural disasters such as hurricanes. I got to talk to him for a little bit about hurricane Katrina, since that was his most recent natural disaster that he helped with at the time. He said it was probably one of the, if not the worst of the natural disaster to help clean and rebuild. He spent the most time with that natural disaster than any others he said. From de-flooding homes, to destroying homes, to rebuilding homes was one of the most strenuous things he has ever had to do in his career.

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Mapping the Spread of Drought Across the U.S.

Mapping the Spread of Drought Across the U.S. | AP HUG | Scoop.it
Maps and charts updated weekly show the latest extent of the drought in the United States.

Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 15, 2014 2:58 PM

I've shared numerous links here about the drought situation in California over the past few months, but the situation extends far beyond California as these animated maps and charts demonstrate. Some of the best public data on drought can be found at the National Drought Mitigation Center


Tags: wateragriculture, environmentresources, environment depend, physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 24, 2014 8:00 PM

Whether global warming or just one of the heat and cooling cycles, this drought is extensive and making an impact on food prices.

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Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact | AP HUG | Scoop.it
Using aerial photographs that render imperiled landscapes almost abstract, Edward Burtynsky explores the consequences of human activity bearing down on the earth’s resources.

Via Seth Dixon
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Diane Johnson's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:12 AM

These images may be very useful for teaching the DCI's under the Human Impact topic.

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, August 11, 2014 6:48 PM

Is this evidence of homgeniziation of landscapes?

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:11 PM

People change landscapes. This is a great resource available as an iPad App also Called Burtynsky Water. 

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Where We Came From, State by State

Where We Came From, State by State | AP HUG | Scoop.it
Charts showing how Americans have moved between states for 112 years.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 14, 2014 1:20 PM

This incredible series of interactive charts from the New York Times show where the residents of every U.S. state were born and how that data has changed over time (update: now available as an interactive map).  This graph of Florida shows that around 1900, most people living in Florida were from the South.  Around the middle of the 20th century more people from other parts of the U.S. and from outside the U.S. started moving in.  What changes in U.S. society led to these demographic shifts?  How has demographics of your state changes over the last 114 years? 

   

On the flip side, many people have been leaving California and this article charts the demographic impact of Californians on other states.  


Tags: migration, USAvisualization, census, unit 2 population.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 17, 2014 3:42 PM

APHG-U2

samantha benitez's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:51 PM

Charts showing how Americans have moved between states for 112 years. helps show the nature of change around the United States and its impact in the enviorment.

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A Start-Up Provides a Picture of Our Shape-Shifting Planet

A Start-Up Provides a Picture of Our Shape-Shifting Planet | AP HUG | Scoop.it
Population growth, globalization and technology are changing Earth like never before. A series of images from a satellite imaging start-up shows, in moving deserts, spreading airports and shifting water resources, how rapidly we move things around.
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Ebola: Mapping the outbreak

Ebola: Mapping the outbreak | AP HUG | Scoop.it

Maps illustrate the regions worst affected by Ebola in West Africa


Via Allison Anthony
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Population control: Is it a tool of the rich?

Population control: Is it a tool of the rich? | AP HUG | Scoop.it
As the world population reaches seven billion people, the BBC's Mike Gallagher charts ideals and the criticisms of population control campaigns over the past 50 years.

Via Salem MS Library, Nancy Watson
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 22, 2014 8:18 PM

Populations on the increase or decline, who controls it?

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 21, 2014 11:33 PM

Unit 2

Salem MS Library's curator insight, October 20, 2014 11:07 AM

FOR

Reason: strain on natural resources

 

AGAINST

Reason: cannot be enforced fairly

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National Geographic: Eye in the Sky--Overpopulation

National Geographic photographs and video clips show evidence of overpopulation on Earth and methods to help control it.

Via Nancy Watson
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U.S. Hispanic and Asian populations growing, but for different reasons

U.S. Hispanic and Asian populations growing, but for different reasons | AP HUG | Scoop.it
Both Hispanics and Asians been among the fastest-growing racial/ethnic groups in recent years, but since 2010, number of Asians have increased at a faster rate.

Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 27, 2014 10:15 AM

It is often noted that the cultural composition of the United States is undergoing a shift, referred to by some as the "Browning of America."  The story of Asian and Hispanic growth in the United States are occurring simultaneously, which makes many assume that they are growing for the same reasons.  The data clearly shows that this is not the case.  


Tags: migration, USA, ethnicity.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:55 PM

APHG-U2

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 26, 2014 9:46 PM

A very interesting fact, because I thought that Hispanic race had grown rather than Asian race in the last few years but I see that not. Another thing that caught my attention was that the Hispanic  population has  growth due to the Hispanic  birth here in U.S and not because they immigrate to U.S. But in the case of the growth of the Asian population, is because they immigrate. I didn't know that, now I am more  informed.

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Urban Heat Islands Are Helping Kill Trees

Urban Heat Islands Are Helping Kill Trees | AP HUG | Scoop.it
The warmer conditions cities create make plant-eating pests thrive.

Via Nancy Watson
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 2014 12:51 PM

Unintended consequences are almost always a surprise, but when considered in context, make sense and probably should have been anticipated.

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Map: The happiest places in America

Map: The happiest places in America | AP HUG | Scoop.it
What a ranking of unhappy cities can tell you about human decision-making

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The Shadow Apocalypse

The Shadow Apocalypse | AP HUG | Scoop.it
Now there are American casualties.
Not in Gaza, and not on the ill-fated Malaysian airliner. Now there are American casualties in another war very far away so maybe, goddammit, somebody should start paying more attention to it.
Kent Brantly, 33, an A...

Via Nancy Watson
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 28, 2014 5:43 PM

Warfare can come in many ways.

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Topography of Religion

Topography of Religion | AP HUG | Scoop.it

"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.'  Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions break down by state."


Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
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Ignacio Quintana's curator insight, December 1, 2014 6:56 PM

Even though this is just an info-graphic, this is very interesting. What we can see from this map is the spatial organization of religion specifically in the U.S. It's interesting to see how protestant makes up the majority (but apparently not according to the article above this from Haak's page) and how drastically these views can change from coast to coast, and state to state. What I find particularly interesting is that you can clearly find hearths of many of these religions, for example, Utah has an extremely out-numbering amount of Mormons. For obvious reasons that is, but still very educational to see the centers of many of the big religions in the United States.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:46 PM

Looking at the map, it looks like the Northeast is predominately Catholic while the further South you go along the Eastern coast, you find more Protestants, mostly Evangelical, especially in the from Confederate States. The Mid and Northwest seems to hold a healthy mix of all the Christian denominations while places in the Southwest have a higher Catholic percentage, my guess would be from immigration from Mexico. The one odd ball out in the Southwest is Utah with its 58% of Mormons.

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 4:04 PM

Different cultural religions and senses of place in America. This graph shows the diversity of religion around the united states as it varies from place to place. 

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Russia Shuts Down McDonald's Franchises

Russia Shuts Down McDonald's Franchises | AP HUG | Scoop.it

In a move that has been widely seen as retaliatory, the Russian government has kicked off a series of random checks at McDonald's around the country, and has already shut down four prime locations in Moscow.


Via Allison Anthony, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks, Nancy Watson
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Allison Anthony's curator insight, August 23, 2014 8:51 AM
Putin using the Big Mac attack strategy.
Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 24, 2014 7:57 PM

This was at one time the largest McDonalds.

 

Rescooped by Barbara Kreider from visual data
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40 Maps That Explain The Internet

40 Maps That Explain The Internet | AP HUG | Scoop.it

The internet increasingly pervades our lives, delivering information to us no matter where we are. It takes a complex system of cables, servers, towers, and other infrastructure, developed over decades, to allow us to stay in touch with our friends and family so effortlessly. Here are 40 maps that will help you better understand the internet — where it came from, how it works, and how it's used by people around the world.


Via Lauren Moss
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Well Connected Mom's curator insight, August 22, 2014 8:04 PM

Curious how the Internet started?  These maps of servers show the progression.

Coolwired's curator insight, August 31, 2014 10:04 AM

This informative site sheds light on the pervasive workings of the Internet.

Mel Leggatt's curator insight, November 20, 2014 11:36 AM

A really excellent visual resource for understanding how the Internet has and continues to evolve.

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Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World | AP HUG | Scoop.it

Elizabeth Borneman explores how cartography and cartographic projections help and hinder our perception of the world.

"How do you think the world (starting with our perceptions) could change if the map looked differently? What if Australia was on top and the hemispheres switched? By changing how we look at a map we truly can begin to explore and change our assumptions about the world we live in."

 

Geography doesn’t just teach us about the Earth; it provides ways for thinking about the Earth that shapes how we see the world.  Maps do the same; they represent a version of reality and that influences how we think about places. 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective.


Via Seth Dixon
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samantha benitez's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:53 PM

helps show the different perspectives of our world and how it has changed. also shows many different forms of mapping our world throughout time.

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:34 AM

UNIT 1 

This article discusses map projections and how they shape our perception of the world. Maps influence how we see the world, and could change the way we see it as well. These projections show us many different views of the Earth, which is very influential to our perspectives. This applies to unit 1 and its major concepts and underlying geographical perspective such as analyzing maps. 

Vicki S Albritton's curator insight, August 26, 8:35 PM
What we see isn't always what is.
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Do you know Africa?

Do you know Africa? | AP HUG | Scoop.it

Many of Africa’s leaders will be in town next week attending a White House summit. The continent’s land is shared among 49 countries — many of which rarely make U.S. headlines. How familiar are you with Africa’s geography?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 2015 3:41 PM

http://lizardpoint.com/geography/africa-quiz.php

This is easier because it shows you the shape of the countries. As for this quiz, I can locate any African country but some of them, not precisely. I'm able to locate Ethiopia, Libya and Angola obviously because they're bigger but not Togo, Eritrea and Rwanda. However, I can closely locate the smaller countries but not precisely.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 2015 5:21 PM

I love interactive maps like this.  These are the best way to learn where things are in the world geographically.  Africa is the toughest, for myself, continent in the world to be able to locate and identify where certain countries are.  This is in part because Africa has so many countries and also Africa is a part of the world that is not often taught in school, therefore you have limited thoughts and ideas about these types of areas.

David Lizotte's curator insight, April 22, 2015 1:54 PM

I have always been fascinated with Africa and its history. Through its history one can understand why Africa is the way it is today. Its a shame that Africa does not have more of a focus in the Public School Curriculum. Its played a huge part in developing western civilization, whether it be in ancient Alexandria providing grain for the Roman Republic or the coltan extracted through inhumane means in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Africa is a continent that has been raped and torn in a repetitive manor under a variety of foul experiences brought upon by western countries. These are the same western countries that are held of high interest and regards in subject manor instituted in the Public School System. Africa has also been apart of amazing developments of human civilization, for example the Trans Saharan Trade Route which linked Kingdoms such as Ancient Ghana to dynasties far in the Middle East. It is also the birthplace of man (no big deal). In either case there needs to be a stronger push on teaching/molding "Africa" (yes, I know... broad) into the curriculum. It is important in both understanding the history of the world, specifically western civilization and how it coined itself  “civilized.” Through introducing basic aspects, history, and dilemmas (both old and modern) it could inspire more interest and an expansion of knowledge from student to student. School is and will most likely continue to be Euro-centric and have large flares of Americana and other “themes” of North America. 

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Hipsternomics: Is the creative class ruining urban communities? - CNN

Hipsternomics: Is the creative class ruining urban communities? - CNN | AP HUG | Scoop.it
CNN
Hipsternomics: Is the creative class ruining urban communities?
CNN
According to Loretta Lees, professor of human geography at the University of Leicester, what has happened follows a well worn pattern of urban development.
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40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World

40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World | AP HUG | Scoop.it
  If you're a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this c...

Via Nancy Watson
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 22, 2014 6:42 PM

Several of these are very telling

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 1:03 PM

Unit 1

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Here's One Big Thing You Can Do For A Greener Diet

Here's One Big Thing You Can Do For A Greener Diet | AP HUG | Scoop.it
A new study on the environmental burdens of beef, pork, chicken, eggs, dairy and plant products finds that beef is by far the worst offender.

According to the study, published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a prominent ...

Via Nancy Watson
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 21, 2014 8:42 PM

Are we willing to break the beef habit

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 26, 2014 10:39 PM

Not new, but I love a good steak :(

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Satellites Are Now Cleared to Take Photos at Mailbox-Level Detail

Satellites Are Now Cleared to Take Photos at Mailbox-Level Detail | AP HUG | Scoop.it
The Department of Commerce just lifted a ban on satellite images that showed features smaller than 20 inches. The nation's largest satellite imaging firm, Digital Globe, asked the government to lift the restrictions and can now sell images showing details as small as a foot. A few inches may seem slight, but this is actually a big deal.

Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
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Jacques Lebègue's curator insight, July 26, 2014 1:10 AM

 

Une concurrence redoutable pour les drones d'observation et de guidage. Avec quelques questions sur les dérives potentielles (donc probables) en matière de vie privée...

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:58 PM

APHG-U1

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, August 18, 2014 1:03 PM

Unit 1

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Why do competitors open their stores next to one another?

 

"Why are all the gas stations, cafes and restaurants in one crowded spot? As two competitive cousins vie for ice-cream-selling domination on one small beach, discover how game theory and the Nash Equilibrium inform these retail hotspots."


Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
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CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:03 PM

For use in understanding the placement of businesses in Human Geography.

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:34 AM

A great video lesson that gets at the heart of location theory and competition.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 10:11 AM

unit 6

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Gendered Cultural Narratives

Gendered Cultural Narratives | AP HUG | Scoop.it

"As a Muslim woman who chooses to wear hijab,I'd like to apologize for this poster, to my non-hijab wearing cohorts. http://pic.twitter.com/IoLfDPEGx7”;


Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson
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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 19, 2015 8:03 PM

This idea that women do not have human rights takes place in Saudi Arabia. What this poster is saying is that women are sweet creatures metaphorically just like candy. As you can see on the right, the candy is wrapped and covered just like the woman covered in a hijab and on the left, the candy is unwrapped and it shows the exposure of the woman and her features. Saudi Arabia has a strict rule about women being covered up and not exposing themselves to the outside world just like the image on the right.

David Lizotte's curator insight, March 25, 2015 8:19 PM

This poster/advertisement raises many questions. Having discussed it in detail during class it left me with a few questions and comments. One is whom created this poster? Two, where was this poster advertised? Three, its an extremely original piece of propaganda which passes judgement on woman and the way they are to live. Four, as discussed in class, the color green is a dominant "true" Islamic color. But what's also interesting is that the preferred character of women is on the east side of the poster while the scandalous-less preferred- woman is on the west side. Western influence in a middle eastern Islamic region is not quite received with open arms... Its almost saying Arab women should stay true to Islam and cover themselves. Women whom are influenced by western culture have lost there way and are damaged goods that no true man of Islam would want to pursue. 

This piece of propaganda has many layers to it. Although I personally am not too keen on the message it is an interesting and creative "piece" to say the least. Its too bad it is used to label and even dehumanize women.  

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 2015 4:37 PM

Im sure this poster was highly offensive to many people in the middle east, both male and female.  There is a lot of meaning in each picture, but the basic point seems to be that the image on the right is the way that a lady is supposed to dress, the way that is more appropriate.  Conservative with the candy wrapped, it shows that a woman should dress and act a certain way, while the other image has a girl, who appears to be naked with her hair blowing around, who looks like she has no values, or respect for her religion.

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By 2060, the American South Could Be Three Times as Urbanized

By 2060, the American South Could Be Three Times as Urbanized | AP HUG | Scoop.it
Here comes Charlanta the Gargantua.

Via Nancy Watson
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 2014 12:56 PM

Predictions are just that, so this is not a guarantee, but we are getting more sophisticated in correctly predicting future trends and consequences. As thinking humans we can influence the future with our actions in the present.