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German government to boost organic farming

German government to boost organic farming | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it

Germany is hungry for organic products. But, despite good market conditions, and heavy marketing, organic farmers are not reaping their share of the boom’s benefits, something Agriculture Minister Christian Schmidt intends to change. 


Via Soil Association
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Organic farming, crop rotation, value-added specialty foods, regional appellations, fair trade, and eat-local-food movements-

 

This article explains how Germany's government is boosting the movement for organic products. However, organic farmers are not completing their share of organics, and the government is doing everything to change that.

 

This article demonstrates Organic Farming by showing what some nations will do to eat healthy and keep their people safe from life-threatening GMO's.

 
more...
Soil Association's curator insight, May 22, 2015 5:58 AM

Trevor Mansfield, Soil Association head of policy, said: "In Germany, where the organic market is growing, the government wants to introduce an Organic Farming plan so that farming can keep up with demand.  In the UK we also have growing demand but the area of organic farmland is actually falling.  We need a Government-backed plan to grow the sector here too."

Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:55 AM

This scoop is a wonderful example of a country trying to meet the demands for organic farmed goods. The green movement grows everyday and has tons of small farmers who practices it. The only problem is that it is hard to mass produce goods to meet the growing demand. German people are asking for the organic goods and their government will do all in its power to make it happen because Europe is typically very against GMO's. 

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German government to boost organic farming

German government to boost organic farming | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it

Germany is hungry for organic products. But, despite good market conditions, and heavy marketing, organic farmers are not reaping their share of the boom’s benefits, something Agriculture Minister Christian Schmidt intends to change. 


Via Soil Association
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Organic farming, crop rotation, value-added specialty foods, regional appellations, fair trade, and eat-local-food movements-

 

This article explains how Germany's government is boosting the movement for organic products. However, organic farmers are not completing their share of organics, and the government is doing everything to change that.

 

This article demonstrates Organic Farming by showing what some nations will do to eat healthy and keep their people safe from life-threatening GMO's.

 
more...
Soil Association's curator insight, May 22, 2015 5:58 AM

Trevor Mansfield, Soil Association head of policy, said: "In Germany, where the organic market is growing, the government wants to introduce an Organic Farming plan so that farming can keep up with demand.  In the UK we also have growing demand but the area of organic farmland is actually falling.  We need a Government-backed plan to grow the sector here too."

Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:55 AM

This scoop is a wonderful example of a country trying to meet the demands for organic farmed goods. The green movement grows everyday and has tons of small farmers who practices it. The only problem is that it is hard to mass produce goods to meet the growing demand. German people are asking for the organic goods and their government will do all in its power to make it happen because Europe is typically very against GMO's. 

Rescooped by Gareth Jukes from Geography Education
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Declining Populations

Declining Populations | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it

"All over the continent, potential parents have shown reluctance to have more babies. Hence, governments and advocacy groups are becoming increasingly creative about getting their citizens to make babies."


Tag: Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model.


Via Seth Dixon
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Effects of national population policies: promoting population growth in some countries or reducing fertility rates in others-

This article explains how Europe's population is starting to run lower and lower, so governments are trying to get people to have more children. In fact, the government is doing as much as they can without intervening with the families.

This article shows effects of national population policies: promoting population growth in some countries  by showing how some countries populations are declining, and the government is doing everything they can to get the fertility rate up again.

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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 2:18 PM

This is very important for these countries because people are getting older and eventually to keep the country economically, politically, population, socially and most important culturally stable the population needs to rise by birth rates even though it can still rise by immigrations but it would eventually lose its true culture.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:32 PM

After reading such an article, I could not understand why someone would not want to have children, especially with the incentives offered by the governments. Clearly it seems as if Denmark is the most concerned because they take up three out of five of the slots for how Europe is trying to convince its citizens to make more babies. In general, the incentives seem to be very good, good enough for someone to want to have children. In Sweden you get 480 days out of work plus 80% of your previous salary, Denmark says if Danes were successful in conceiving a child while being on a vacation organized by the company, they were eligible to win three years of free diapers and a trip abroad and France pays families monthly allowances to their children who are younger than 20, plus discounts. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 3:01 PM

the fact that these campaigns are necessary in this age where migrants are flooding Europe and the birth rate is declining. its amazing that this is necessary, but with the birthrate declining the only other home to insure their economic system continues to function is to get the migrants working.

Rescooped by Gareth Jukes from Geography Education
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China (not Mexico) is the top source of new immigrants to the U.S.

China (not Mexico) is the top source of new immigrants to the U.S. | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it

"In 2013, China replaced Mexico as the top sending country for immigrants to the United States. This followed a decade where immigration from China and India increased while immigration from Mexico decreased."


Via Seth Dixon
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Push and pull factors, and migration in relation to employment and quality of life-

This article explains how China in 2013 had more immigrants going to the US than Mexico. The reasons why were because of jobs and better life styles in the US.

This article represents push and pull factors, and migration in relation to employment and quality of life by showing why china had more immigrants going to the US because of job opportunities and better life styles.

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Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 2015 11:13 AM

Showing the different numbers of refugees have changed over time and what country they are from. As of now, Mexico is not the leading country that produces refugees in the US, its china. People have now migrated due to different economic patterns, and as economies change so do the refugees. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 20, 2015 10:18 PM

I can already imagine the reactions I would receive from a couple of people I know if I were to post something like this on Facebook. Too often, popular opinion trumps fact, which contributes to the continued existence of stereotypes and inherently racist beliefs/institutions. I find it particularly humorous that the bulk of anti-immigration sentiment is cast at the Hispanic-American population now knowing that they do not even compromise the largest immigrant populations now entering the country! It makes it painfully obvious that this hate of Hispanic immigrants held by many Americans is less about "job security" and more about racism. I will, however, point out that the census bureau doe not account for illegal immigration to my knowledge, and I would be interested to see how this would affect the data presented in this article. 

Mrs. Madeck's curator insight, October 1, 2015 5:57 PM

accompany "What is Normal" vidoe

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The Precision Agriculture Revolution

The Precision Agriculture Revolution | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it

"Thousands of years ago, agriculture began as a highly site-specific activity. The first farmers were gardeners who nurtured individual plants, and they sought out the microclimates and patches of soil that favored those plants. But as farmers acquired scientific knowledge and mechanical expertise, they enlarged their plots, using standardized approaches—plowing the soil, spreading animal manure as fertilizer, rotating the crops from year to year—to boost crop yields. Over the years, they developed better methods of preparing the soil and protecting plants from insects and, eventually, machines to reduce the labor required. Starting in the nineteenth century, scientists invented chemical pesticides and used newly discovered genetic principles to select for more productive plants. Even though these methods maximized overall productivity, they led some areas within fields to underperform. Nonetheless, yields rose to once-unimaginable levels: for some crops, they increased tenfold from the nineteenth century to the present.  

Today, however, the trend toward ever more uniform practices is starting to reverse, thanks to what is known as 'precision agriculture.' Taking advantage of information technology, farmers can now collect precise data about their fields and use that knowledge to customize how they cultivate each square foot."


Tags: technology, food production, agriculture, agribusiness, spatial, GPS.


Via Seth Dixon
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Land use/land cover change: irrigation, desertification, deforestation, wetland destruction, conservation efforts to protect or restore natural land cover, and global impacts-

This article explains how today we have the best technology we have ever created agriculture-wise, but with this, more land has been used. But thanks to precision agriculture, we can use data to determine where we can use the least amount of raw materials needed, thus helping protect more land than before.

 This article demonstrates land use/land cover change: irrigation, desertification, deforestation, wetland destruction, conservation efforts to protect or restore natural land cover, and global impacts by showing how with the technology today and precision farming, we can use less raw materials than ever before, thus helping lessen global impact.

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Cade Johns's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:57 AM

Agriculture has evolved very much over time to many different methods of growing things and theyve changed the way we affect the soil.-CJ

Samuel bennett's curator insight, January 10, 11:50 AM

In this article it talks about the development of agriculture  and how most of it started. This article relates to my world cultural geography class by telling how people used agriculture to provide for themselves and better there methods year after year. The use of technology and the pesticides they used to help there crops grow is similar  in our class to the was technology was developed and helped out a lot in the fields and in everyday life.

Alanna Thompson's curator insight, January 10, 1:17 PM

This is very interesting insight on how farmers use precision agriculture to customize how they cultivate each square foot of their fields. In my opinion precision agriculture is a good way for farmers to know exactly what they need to do to their field and what they should plant. It also is a way for them to make sure none of the areas within their field underperform. 

Rescooped by Gareth Jukes from Geogrpahy - Spatial Science - Geographic Information Systems
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Finding and Using Spatial Data Sources

Finding and Using Spatial Data Sources | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it
By Seth Dixon, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geography, Rhode Island College Data is great, but working with numbers can be intimidating. We have more data than ever before that is available to us,...

Via Neil Bombardier
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Sources of geographical information and ideas: the field, census data, online data, aerial photography, and satellite imagery-

   This article explains where perfect places to get good information are on the internet, but how we use it is a better way to understand it. Instead of using books, we can use the information at our fingertips in our computers, and how it holds more data available than ever.

   This article shows sources of geographical information and ideas by showing how we can use the internet to find more information and store more geographic information than ever before, especially on the website, Library of Congress.

more...
Neil Bombardier's curator insight, January 29, 2015 11:04 PM

A great piece on where you can find some data

Rescooped by Gareth Jukes from Interesting Reading to learn English -intermediate - advanced (B1, B2, C1,)
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Gender Gap Index

Gender Gap Index | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it

Seth Dixon's insight: 

According to the World Economic Forum (WEF), Scandinavia is the place to be.  This interactive map uses data that was compiled from an index to measure gender equality in health, access to education, economic participation and political engagement. 

 

The four highest ranked countries in the world, Iceland, Finland, Norway and Sweden) are all in Scandinavia. 

 

Thanks to the Guardian Datablog, you can download all of the data in a spreadsheet to map on your own.

 

This interactive map is excellent, but a more expanded series of maps concerning gender (in)equality in the world regarding the status of women can be found on the WomanStats project page. 

 

 

 


Via Seth Dixon, Aulde de B
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Gender Inequality Index-

This article explains the places and locations of gender inequality, and how most of this is densely kept in Africa, where most men are more powerful than women. It also shows how in more developed countries, their is gender equality, and with it better economy.

This article shows gender inequality index by the map and information displaying how gender inequality is located more in developing countries. And gender equality is placed in developed countries.

 

more...
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:35 PM

No surprise here that the countries that are more well off generally have less of a gender gap. One thing that i like to point out about this article is that the united states came in 23rd which i think is pretty humerous since we pride outselfs on our rights and equality but were not even in the top 20 countries in the world when it comes down to equality between genders. The biggest surprise of this article though has to be nicaragua coming in 10th even though every country around it scored poorly. hopefully the nicaraguans can teach their fellow costa ricans and houndurans how to close the gap.

xavia's comment, April 10, 2014 12:38 AM
gender gap chloropleth
Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 29, 2015 8:30 AM

Summary- This map shows the equality of genders through their economic participation,  health, and access to education. In many poorer places you can see there is a much greater gender gap than in places like scandinavia where there isn't much of a gap at all. I

 

Insight- In Unit 3 one of the main subjects was gender. This chloropleth map shows the relationship between states and their equality among genders. It is easy to tell that in most undeveloped countries there is a much larger gender gap than more developed ones.

Rescooped by Gareth Jukes from Cultural Geography
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How to eat pork, drink booze and be a 'good' Muslim

How to eat pork, drink booze and be a 'good' Muslim | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it
Less than two weeks after the Charlie Hebdo attacks — and the subsequent demands that followed for Muslims to denounce violence — it's got to be a tough time to produce a light-hearted podcast called "Good Muslim/Bad Muslim." But that's not what hosts Taz Ahmed and Zahra Noorbakhsh think.

Via Seth Dixon
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Differences in cultural attitudes and practices toward the environment-

This article explains how cultural attitudes and practices toward the environment determines if you are a "good" person, or a "bad" person. When two Muslims came together, from the start one was considered good and the other considered bad, but they both thought that this was the completely wrong opinion, in fact, they thought the contrary.

This article shows how your cultural attitudes and how you act determine how people act to you and how others feel about you.

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Rescooped by Gareth Jukes from Cultural Geography
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The Chinese-Mexican Cuisine Born Of U.S. Prejudice

The Chinese-Mexican Cuisine Born Of U.S. Prejudice | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it
Fried yellow chilis. Baja-style fish. Not the typical Chinese restaurant fare, unless you're near the U.S.-Mexico border. The reasons go back to an 1882 law enacted to keep Chinese out of the U.S.

Via Seth Dixon
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Popular and Folk Culture-

This article explains how folk culture can spread into pop culture, such as Chinese cuisine near the U.S Mexican Border.

This article creates a sense of folk culture and popular culture because it shows how a Chinese cuisine was diffused into America, becoming popular cultural food, and blending with other closer cultures.

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As migrants we leave home in search of a future, but we lose the past | Gary Younge

As migrants we leave home in search of a future, but we lose the past | Gary Younge | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it
Immigration is never an easy option: leaving people and places behind always comes at a painful price

Via Irial Glynn
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Migration-

 

This article is about how migration always involves the loss of something, but looking toward the future for another. It explains how in order to migrate or immigrate, you must leave something behind, in order to move on. It also speaks of how painful it can be, whether it is from leaving friends, or leaving your country because of war.

 

This article contributes to Migration by explaining the pain and gain of moving from one place to another, whether forced or voluntary.

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The largest migration in history

The largest migration in history | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it

Many people are migrating out of China now because they are informed of the new population laws and how hard it is to get a job because of all the competition.


Via Matt Beiriger, gandhi muhammed
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Major Historical migrations-

 

This article explains the one of the largest migrations in history. This migration was when many inland cities in China were poor, and did not have a high enough wage to keep their wages. Therefore, people left and worked at outer factories to gain money for them and their families. But now, due to large investments in governments, the inland cities became wealthier and were able to keep hold of their inhabitants.

 

This article contributes to major historical migrations because it talks about one of the largest migrations in history, and how many cities in China became much wealthier.

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Here's How The Map Of Europe Would Be Redrawn If All The Separatist Movements Get Their Way

Here's How The Map Of Europe Would Be Redrawn If All The Separatist Movements Get Their Way | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it

"From Catalonia and Basque Country in Spain to Veneto, South Tyrol, and the island of Sardinia in Italy to Flanders in Belgium, 'the precedent of the vote on self-determination will reverberate around the Continent,' The New York Times writes.

If you want a rough idea of how European borders would have to be redrawn if regions with a separatist agenda got their way, you can look at the map below, put together by the European Free Alliance, to which '40 progressive nationalist, regionalist and autonomous parties throughout the European Union' belong."


Via Seth Dixon, Mrs. B
Gareth Jukes's insight:

How to use and think about maps and geospatial data-

 

This article explains how Europe would look today if all of the separartist movements succeeded, and how confusing it would be. We would have about 36 new countries added to our already known Europe continent.

 

This article explains the idea of using and thinking about maps by giving the reader an idea of how one thought can create a map, like this one.

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Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 18, 2015 12:12 PM

This map shows all the separatist movements that Europe has spawned. It shows the different territories that these movements would have gained if they had all succeeded. It is A very different map of Europe then we have today. A very good reminder of how Europe's history and culture is still very different from our own. Separatist movements had a lot of different results. Very few ever resulted in the acquisition of any power or territory, but they are maybe the beginnings of social rights movements. Unit 3 Culture

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 2:15 AM

This map perfectly demonstrates the fragmentation of Europe due to separatist movements. Many of these movements seeks to gain social, political, and economic freedom from their current government. It's interesting to see just how many separatist movements exist between the border of Spain and France. I think the reason why there are so many is because of the large immigrant populations in France and Spain. These large immigrant population aggregate and create a subculture within these countries. This creation of the subculture elicits sentiments for certain relevant causes to the community, causing them to become separatist movements. This demonstrates the constant possibility of border changes in the world. There are always going to be separatist movements seeking to create their own sovereign nation and change the political landscape of the world.

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:42 AM

UNIT 1

This article explains the phenomena of separatist movements, and what the world would look like if these movements achieved independence. This applies to analyzing phenomenons in various regains. European borders are greatly changed in this map, showing many new nations if the separatist agenda got their way. 

Rescooped by Gareth Jukes from AP Human Geography
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Last of China's Lotus Feet Women

Last of China's Lotus Feet Women | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it
As the last generation of Chinese women with bound feet ages into their final decades, Jo Farrell set out to photograph the survivors of this brutal beauty tradition.

Via Mrs. B
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Culture Traits-

 

This article explains how China's people have lost their cultural trait of binding womans feet to keep them small. During these last few decades, their have been less and less bindings, and today we see the final years of these traits.

 

This corresponds with the idea of cultural traits because it talks about how less and less bindings of feet has been seen. This was an old beauty trait that woman did for men to fall in love with them.

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zane alan berger's curator insight, March 25, 2015 6:56 PM

This article celebrates the last generation of a cruel tradition dating far back. In China, 'Lotus feet" is the tampering of women's feet that essentially deforms the foot into something they call beauty. However this tradition ends with this generation, which is recognized by this blog. (FOLK CULTURE)

Rescooped by Gareth Jukes from The France News Net - Latest stories
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France’s baby boom secret: get women into work and ditch rigid family norms

France’s baby boom secret: get women into work and ditch rigid family norms | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it
ver the past 10 years the offices of France’s National Institute for Demographic Studies (Ined) have seen a steady stream of Korean policymakers and Japanese academics, determined to crack the mystery of French fertility. Scientists present their birthrate graphs and explain the broad lines of French public policy. “In the past four or five years we’ve had over 10 Korean delegations,” says demographer Olivier Thévenon with a smile. Haunted by the threat of population decline, these Asian experts are keen to understand the recipe that has given France the highest fertility rate in Europe, alongside Ireland.

Since the early 2000s France has consistently topped European rankings. After two decades of decline, in the 1970s-80s, the fertility rate started picking up again in the late 1990s. Since then the country has registered scores just short of the mythical threshold of 2.1 children per woman, which would secure a steady population. Its fertility rate in 2014 was 2.01. “For the economy Germany is the strong man of Europe, but when it comes to demography France is our fecund woman,” says demographer Ron Lesthaeghe, member of the Belgian Royal Academy of Sciences and emeritus professor of Brussels Free University.

Via French-News-Online.com
Gareth Jukes's insight:

 Population growth and decline over time and space-

 

This article explains how France's fertility rate has helped make France become a steadier population. It also explains how in the 1970s-80s, France's population decreased, then picked back up in 1990. Since then the country registered a steady fertility rate of 2.1 children per woman.

 

This article portrays the idea of population growth and decline over time because as the fertility rate dropped, the population decreased due to less babies born. Then the population grew as the fertility rate increased.

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Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 2015 3:12 AM

This article is showing the changing fertility rate of France , but the topic of fertility is much bigger than one country. Fertility rate can be the factor when computing things such as a countries HDI. The lower the fertility rate the higher developed the country is typically. The goal is to have everyone with low fertility rates. 

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HDI over time in Central America

HDI over time in Central America | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it

"Explore public data through Google's visualization tools." 


Via Seth Dixon
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Human Development Index-

This article explains how more and more countries in Central America are becoming more developed and have higher HDI. This helps create better views on Central America, thus giving it better chances via trade with other countries.

 

This article demonstrates the idea of HDI by showing the actual HDI's in Central America, and how most countries are increasing overall.

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MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:28 AM

Population Unit

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:29 PM

With all the talk in media circles of how much off the world is now than it was 30 years ago, it's reassuring to see progress in a region that is characterized as violent and unstable. Although violence continues to plague this region more in relation to the West, progress is being made. From this, we can infer that the political landscape of these nations has improved, which would allow for greater economic growth, which in turn leads to a higher standard of living. The notion that this region is becoming more and more backwards is untrue and finds its foundation in the racist beliefs held by many white Americans, who dominate the media. There is a lot of work that remains to be done- Honduras continues to have one of the highest murder rates in the world- but progress is being made, and that will only help to strengthen the world economy. 

Luis R Soto's curator insight, March 19, 2016 8:37 PM

One exercise that I do in many of my classes is based on this data and and outline map.  I have the students map out the Human Development Index data for Central America (full global dataset here) on an outline map of the region.   


Questions to Ponder: How might we be able to infer about migration within the region?  Foreign investment?  Political stability? 


Tags: Middle America, development, statistics, economic, mapping.

Rescooped by Gareth Jukes from Geography Education
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Mapping US History with GIS

Mapping US History with GIS | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Use of geospatial technologies, such as GIS, remote sensing, global positioning systems (GPS), and online maps-

This article explains how GIS can be used multiple ways, whether it be in location, past, present, or predictions on the future. These GIS examples show how  the American Civil War and many other things would have been seen as.

This article demonstrates the use of geospatial technologies by showing how American history would be like if represented by GIS.

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 4, 2015 10:22 AM

Get students thinking about patterns and the 'why's' of history with a focus on the geography and movement behind the historical story.  This is the link to some of the digital maps that can help you put history in it's place.  For more lesson plans, click here


Tags: historical, USA, mappingspatial, GIS,  ESRI, edtech.

Yunus Khan's comment, May 7, 2015 2:09 AM
Is this new technology
Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 5:20 PM

These maps help show different patterns in the United States throughout different periods of American history such as during the Civil War, the locations of the first railroads, difference in the North and South, and also mapping the constitutional convention. it really help put it all in a geographical perspective. 

This helps create a focus on the movement of people, the "whys" of history, and the different political states and counties we have made over the years.  

Rescooped by Gareth Jukes from Geography Education
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The History of Cuba-U.S. Relations

The History of Cuba-U.S. Relations | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it
One of the last relics of the Cold War ended on December 17, 2014. U.S. President Barack Obama announced a thawing of foreign relations policy between the United States and Cuba.

 

Tags: Cuba, podcast, Maps 101, historical.


Via Seth Dixon
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Fall of communism and legacy of the Cold War-

This article explains how one of the last ideas held strong in the cold war was finally ended. The cold war tore apart Cuba and the US, but on December 17, 2014, the ice between these two countries thawed, thus only having the history of the cold war to live on.

This article shows the legacy of the cold war by showing how the hatred between Cuba and the United States has finally ended, thus leaving only the history and legacy of the cold war behind.

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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:26 AM

For decades the United States of America has ceased contact, trade, and political mention with Cuba due to tensions in the Cold War. Last year around Christmas president Obama announced the permission of free travel and trade with Cuba. This will hopefully strengthen relations and improve harmony between these two countries.

Rescooped by Gareth Jukes from Geography Education
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The Precision Agriculture Revolution

The Precision Agriculture Revolution | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it

"Thousands of years ago, agriculture began as a highly site-specific activity. The first farmers were gardeners who nurtured individual plants, and they sought out the microclimates and patches of soil that favored those plants. But as farmers acquired scientific knowledge and mechanical expertise, they enlarged their plots, using standardized approaches—plowing the soil, spreading animal manure as fertilizer, rotating the crops from year to year—to boost crop yields. Over the years, they developed better methods of preparing the soil and protecting plants from insects and, eventually, machines to reduce the labor required. Starting in the nineteenth century, scientists invented chemical pesticides and used newly discovered genetic principles to select for more productive plants. Even though these methods maximized overall productivity, they led some areas within fields to underperform. Nonetheless, yields rose to once-unimaginable levels: for some crops, they increased tenfold from the nineteenth century to the present.  

Today, however, the trend toward ever more uniform practices is starting to reverse, thanks to what is known as 'precision agriculture.' Taking advantage of information technology, farmers can now collect precise data about their fields and use that knowledge to customize how they cultivate each square foot."


Tags: technology, food production, agriculture, agribusiness, spatial, GPS.


Via Seth Dixon
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Development and diffusion of agriculture-

This article explains how agriculture has developed and grown for thousands of years, and today with our technology, we can do what seemed impossible to the past peoples.

This article represents Development and Diffusion of Agriculture by showing how in our past years, we could mostly only do substinence agriculture, but today with technology, we can do so much more, with so much less people.

more...
Cade Johns's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:57 AM

Agriculture has evolved very much over time to many different methods of growing things and theyve changed the way we affect the soil.-CJ

Samuel bennett's curator insight, January 10, 11:50 AM

In this article it talks about the development of agriculture  and how most of it started. This article relates to my world cultural geography class by telling how people used agriculture to provide for themselves and better there methods year after year. The use of technology and the pesticides they used to help there crops grow is similar  in our class to the was technology was developed and helped out a lot in the fields and in everyday life.

Alanna Thompson's curator insight, January 10, 1:17 PM

This is very interesting insight on how farmers use precision agriculture to customize how they cultivate each square foot of their fields. In my opinion precision agriculture is a good way for farmers to know exactly what they need to do to their field and what they should plant. It also is a way for them to make sure none of the areas within their field underperform. 

Rescooped by Gareth Jukes from High Performance Learning
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Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference

Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it
By Seth Dixon, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geography, Rhode Island College “Whatever you can rightly say about India, the opposite is also true.” —Amartya Sen I am torn about how to teach these t...

Via Adrian Bertolini
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Cultural landscapes and cultural identity-

This article explains how cultural identity and landscapes are always different, and will always have a similar culture. It also shows how when one cultural identity is explained, it will always have a completely opposite culture to face. Not only does this make unwanted opposition, but it creates world based opinions as well on both cultures, which can cause serious problems.

This article represents cultural landscape and identity by showing the worlds views on cultures, and how it can created unwanted oppositions.

 

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Adrian Bertolini's curator insight, February 11, 2015 2:20 AM

Fascinating unpacking of possible lesson ideas for cultural empathy and intercultural understanding

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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.
Seth Dixon‘s insight:
This video shows the place matters; a Washington D.C.

Via Thomas Faltin
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Implications of various densities and distributions-

This article explains how in some different locations, their are very poor urban areas, that do not have grocery stores. This is called a Food Desert, which are located all across America, especially in Nevada.

This article shows how not all distributions and densities are organized, but they always do represent and depend on something, and in this case, it is Food Deserts and poor urban areas.

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I never knew how differently France and America value religion

I never knew how differently France and America value religion | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it
In the United States, we speak easily of different ethnic and religious communities. But the reality is far different in France, where the Charlie Hebdo attacks have brought religion and its place in French society back to the top of the agenda.

Via Seth Dixon
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Cultural conflicts, and law and policy to protect culture-

This article explains the differences between the United States and France, and how they both have very different views on culture. It also explains how in France Charlie Hebdo attacks have increased, thus increasing the demand for culture and religion.

This article explains how simple it is for us in the United States culture and ethnic wise, while in other countries, it is something that is not wanted to be messed with.

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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, January 25, 2015 4:46 PM

I wonder how much America values religion. FRance on the other hand has a different value when speaking of religion.

 

Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, March 17, 2015 12:57 AM

Unlike in the United States, a nation made up of many different communities, France seems to want to achieve the goal of being one nation made of one community. Through this, cultural and religious assimilation are common-and forced-for Muslims and Jews in the country, and religion is expected to be a private matter. This clearly shows the difference in societal views on religion and its place in the lives of the people of a country

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, March 24, 2015 9:50 AM

It's interesting how two western civilizations view religions. America is very religiously based, and acts through their beliefs. In France, religion is not viewed negatively, but isn't quite as important as it is in America. The different views on religion are not necessarily extreme, but still pose as a difference between the two regions. 

Rescooped by Gareth Jukes from Human Geography
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Unit I Geography: Its Nature and Perspectives

Unit I Geography: Its Nature and Perspectives | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it

Via Evan Margiotta
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Geography as a field of Inquiry-

 

This article displays how complex geography is. Ironically, you cannot study "geography", but you can study things like "human geography". Geography has so many applications that it is almost impossible to know all of them. But in the end, most geography is about the study of the Earth and its land-forms, or just the study of land-forms.

 

Finally, this article promotes the theme of geography as a field of inquiry because of all of the applications and all of the studying of land-forms.

 

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Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 21, 2015 5:34 PM

Geography is a huge concept. So large is this concept is that there is not just one field of study in geography, there are many. The principles of geography can be applied across history and the globe. Whether it be the study of land-forms and physical world, or the in depth study of human geography and its many parts, geographical principles have shaped history. Geography is often misunderstood as just the study of the land, but it is much more then that. Not only does it include the land but all the people and things in that land and how they interconnect.

Rescooped by Gareth Jukes from European Union - Justice and Home Affairs
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EU Migration Alert : Hungary, Serbia struggling with influx of refugees - Vatican Radio

EU Migration Alert :   Hungary, Serbia struggling with influx of refugees - Vatican Radio | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it
Hungary, Serbia struggling with influx of refugees

Via Ruud, Marc Van den Broeck
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Refugees and Internally displaced peoples-

 

This article, or radio, describes that Hungary, Serbia is struggling with the influx of refugees. This also means that while more and more refugees arrive, the more difficult it will be for Hungary and Serbia to give them homes and food.

 

This contributes to the idea of refugees because they have been leaving from war and debt in places with ISIS.

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Emerald Pina's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:06 AM

This article is about the struggle Hungary is have on controlling the influx of refugees trying to cross it's borders. The great influx of refugees is greatly affected the lives of villagers. The population was about 4,000 people, but borders are now seeing around 1,500 refugees coming everday. The border patrols are becoming overwhelmed and many times scared of dealing with large masses of refugees in the middle of night. Many of the refugees are persecuted people from Syria, mainly Christians. The mayor believes that Western countries should make reduce the social benefits of asylum seekers predicting it wound decrease and control a great influx of refugees. The mayor states that many of the refugees are not actually asylum seekers running from persecution but people that are looking for money. The mayor believes a balance should be found, but a change of laws is needed. 

 

This article relates to Unit 2: Population and Migration. The article shows the many troubles of refugees. The controlling of refugees is currently a big problem for the European Union and discussion have been taken place to find ways in improving the situation. The article gives a clear understanding of the how refugees can cause major problems for government and villages. It never occured to me that asylum seekers are not real and are only people looking for money. 

Rescooped by Gareth Jukes from AP Human Geography
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Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn't

Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn't | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it
In many countries, eggs aren't refrigerated and they're still considered safe to eat. But in the U.S., we have to chill them, because we've washed away the cuticle that protects them from bacteria.

Via Seth Dixon, Mr. David Burton, Mrs. B
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Variations of major zones and effects of markets-

 

This article describes why the U.S is one of the few countries that actually refrigerates their eggs. This is beacuse we had washed away the cuticle that protects eggs from bacteria. In other countries, they just leave eggs like how they were laid.

 

This article contributes to the idea of variations of markets by explaining how our country is one different from most of others by eggs. It also explains why we are one of the few that must chill the eggs, unlike other markets and/or venders.

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, September 22, 2014 9:26 AM

Interesting investigation for students

aitouaddaC's comment, September 22, 2014 5:16 PM
Amazing !
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:44 PM

For many Americans that are traveling abroad for the first time, realizing that eggs aren't in the refrigerator is a bit of a culture shock (not to mention the moment they find milk in a box that also isn't being refrigerated).  Agricultural practices dictate storage requirements and some things we might have imagined were universal are actually place-specific or peculiar to our cultural setting.  What we are taught to think of as gross, appropriate, attractive or even sanitary is often steeped in a cultural context.  So is it strange the we refrigerate our eggs in the United States, or that they don't in other places? 

 

Tags: food production, technology, industry, food, agriculture, perspective.

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Police: Austin shooter was a ‘homegrown American extremist’

Police: Austin shooter was a ‘homegrown American extremist’ | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it
"Hate was in his heart," Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo said of Larry McQuilliams. Authorities say McQuilliams was associated with the Phineas Priesthood.

Via Mrs. B
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Armed conflicts, war and terrorism-

 

This article reads that a man was shot dead by a police man. He was an American extremist, whom fire bullets into police headquartes and targeted to churches.

 

This article portrays the idea of terrorism because when McQuilliums was killed, the police found numerous places he shot. He was also connected to a American extremist band of people.

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Mrs. B's curator insight, December 2, 2014 6:46 AM

#APHUG Religious extremism at home

Katie's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:03 AM

This article is about an Austin shooter who shot more 100 bullets in downtown Austin. He was killed by a police officer at the scene. They called him a "homegrown American extremist". He was part of a Christian hate group. He was planning on shooting at 2 churches. They think the current immigration debate could have been a reason he shot at the Mexican consulate. I think this would be an example of religion and sacred place, because this guy was a religious extremist against christianism and that may be part of the reason why he planned on shooting at a church.

Rescooped by Gareth Jukes from Geography Education
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The Runner-Up Religions Of America

The Runner-Up Religions Of America | Ap Hug Scoop-it! | Scoop.it

 

"Glance at the map above, Second Largest Religious Tradition in Each State 2010, and you will see that Buddhism (orange), Judaism (pink) and Islam (blue) are the runner-up religions across the country.

No surprises there. But can you believe that Hindu (dark orange) is the No. 2 tradition in Arizona and Delaware, and that Baha'i (green) ranks second in South Carolina? These numbers, although they look impressive when laid out in the map, represent a very tiny fraction of the population in any of the states listed."


Via Seth Dixon
Gareth Jukes's insight:

Religion and sacred places-

 

This article displays the second most known and used religions  in the US. This explains why their is no christianity in the picture. In the end, the Islamic religion is mostly used in the eastern countries, and Buddhism is the mostly used religion in the western countries.

 

This article represents religion and sacred places because it  portrays the image of how so many different religious divides there are in the US.

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Zeke Robinson's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:01 PM

This is very eye opening on the countries second most religion in these states and how Islam has most of the states then Buddhism then Judaism.

Rylee English's curator insight, March 16, 2016 9:58 AM
This map and article helps me have a better understanding of where the contrasting religions on my country are distributed. It's crazy to think that so many people around me have different beliefs than me.RE 
Skyla Macy's curator insight, April 6, 1:17 PM
This article connects with what we learned about in class by displaying and explaining different types of religions. These religions have different celebrations and ways and yet still can all all live in harmony with each other in differences. My opinion on this is that it's great to see people of different cultures and religions get along, although it doesn't always end up that way.