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Giant National Geographic Traveling Map of Asia now at Half Day School in ... - Lincolnshire Review

Giant National Geographic Traveling Map of Asia now at Half Day School in ... - Lincolnshire Review | AP HUG | Scoop.it
Giant National Geographic Traveling Map of Asia now at Half Day School in ...
Holly Hough's insight:
I was really interested to see this article because our class had just constructed a large world map. It is so cool to see that kids of all ages, all over the world, are taking an interest in geography and the role it plays in our lives. The map is going to be used as an educational tool, much like ours. Who knows maybe our large scale map will one day be touring the country.
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Kingdom gearing up for the tourist season! - Arab News

Kingdom gearing up for the tourist season! - Arab News | AP HUG | Scoop.it
Kingdom gearing up for the tourist season!
Holly Hough's insight:
I think this is a wonderful opportunity for the Arab culture to showcase their culture in a positive light. It will help to calm the negative perceptions of middle-eastern cultures all while providing a rich educational environment for tourists. The Kingdom is bringing tourism to the middle-east and is giving the perception of their race and ethnicity a new image.
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WATCH: First World Problems Read By Third World Kids

WATCH: First World Problems Read By Third World Kids | AP HUG | Scoop.it
A new ad campaign from charitable organization Water is Life features Haitian children and adults reading the everyday gripes and minor irritations first world citizens post on Twitter with the popular #FirstWorldProblems hashtag.
Holly Hough's insight:

My brother and I were watching television the other day when an ad came up for a new television series called #RichKids. What? The propo featured two girls lounging by the pool on iphones talking about the new shoes they bought. Then it shows them partying and charging clothes on credit cards #nospendinglimit. My brother and I immediately looked at each other. Stupid! How do people like that get a television show? Perhaps it is our culture's fascination with cars, money, fame, and material possessions. What does this have to do with the article, just about everything. Here people are complaining about no wifi or the wrong order they received at the drive through, when a child in a third world country cries because he is hungry. These people have no clean water or food and we have the audacity to complain about stuff like that. This is definitely and aspect of culture and the emphasis on what's important in life. 

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Germany Fights Population Drop

Germany Fights Population Drop | AP HUG | Scoop.it
As German towns work to hide the emptiness, demographers say a similar fate awaits other European countries, with frightening implications for the economy.

Via Seth Dixon
Holly Hough's insight:

Germany is undergoing a population crisis. The population is plunging due to a high number of elderly people (the dependency ratio is 1:4) and the desire of women to be in the workforce. As a result, the women are not having children. There is a large number of young people who have obtained educations, but are unable to find work, which makes them less likely to want to have kids and start a family. This is a push factor for them to immigrate to another country where they can find work. This leaves Germany with higher dependency ratios and pushes them further towards economic crisis. Germany and many other European countries are offering incentives to women to have children, such as 24 hour child care, tax breaks, and money for married couples. Some fear fertility rates have fallen below replacement level. Just what will Germany do, “part of the solution lies in remaking values, customs and attitudes in a country that has a troubled history with accepting immigrants.” Germany will have to work to pull immigrants to their country to regenerate their population. Who knows where Germany will be 50 years from now?

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John Burik's comment, August 16, 2013 8:33 AM
Guess Tea Party will have to adjust!
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 17, 2013 8:55 PM

Yes, identity!

Sarah Ziolkowski's curator insight, December 31, 2013 11:05 AM

This article applies to how values and preferences impacts an area. For Germany, their low birth rates are being caused by highly valuing  single mothers and discouraging immigrants to stay in their country.  These  unfavorable birth rates may be a future for many other highly developed countries, or already are a part of many countries. This could happen to your home, so your values or preferences may be come a problem to the economy. Low birth rates and unwelcomed immigration are causing decreased work force and increased demand in Germany, that they can't fulfill. It also causes an uneven population between the young and old population. 

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Where St. Nicholas Has His Black Pete(s), Charges of Racism Follow

Where St. Nicholas Has His Black Pete(s), Charges of Racism Follow | AP HUG | Scoop.it
In Dutch tradition, Peter, portrayed by people in blackface makeup, sports outlandish Renaissance costumes, with thick red lips and frizzy hairdo wigs or fake dreadlocks.
Holly Hough's insight:

Christmas time is supposed to bring happiness, cheer, and lots of joy to those around you; however in the Netherlands and other Dutch countries, a St. Nicholas parade has caused quite the controversy. St. Nick strode into town on a horse accompanied by “Black Peters.” The Black Peters clad in afros and the traditional garb of the “high ranking slave,” gladly entertained the children, whom the festival was designed for. Their faces had been painted on, seeing as most of them were caucasian. Some of the adult spectators reacted with hostility towards the use of “Black Peters” in the parade. The display of the “Black Peters” represented the use of African Americans as slaves throughout history. It gave the notion that they were inferior seeing as they were the jesters and servants for St. Nick. This absolutely relates to culture and geography because obviously in the Netherlands the people did not think that this was racist. They didn’t know it would be met with negative reactions. On the flip side they could’ve purposely done this. If this was the case, it shows how the tolerance of other races has not yet diffused to some of the other countries. In their culture it could be socially acceptable to outcast someone in this way, where as in many other cultures, such as our own, this would not be socially acceptable. This then brings in a whole other battle of ethics and morals. What if African Americans were walking around with their faces painted like members of the Klan? If you were African American, how would you feel?

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Speak is a unique cultural treat - Martinsburg Journal

Speak is a unique cultural treat
Martinsburg Journal
He didn't simply "tell" us his story, he performed it, replete with sweeping hand gestures, engaging facial expressions and a constant change of geography, meaning he moved about the room.
Holly Hough's insight:
This is article is a prime example of how language and the use of language can connect people. Through this vivid performance and use of gestures, and facial expressions, the audience was able to understand the performers message. These people were brought together by the cultural aspect of story telling, which some cultures rely heavily upon. People were enthralled with the way he spoke. Language is an interesting diverse topic that attracts the attention of many people.
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Icona Pop carries on Sweden's knack for pop music success; the duo brings its EDM-infused sound to Portland this weekend

Icona Pop carries on Sweden's knack for pop music success; the duo brings its EDM-infused sound to Portland this weekend | AP HUG | Scoop.it
Icona Pop, the latest in a long line of Swede-pop sensations, plays Portland's Wonder Ballroom on Dec. 20.
Holly Hough's insight:

Pop-culture is always changing, especially here in America. The fads come and go. The newest trend in music, electric dance music, has officially diffused to America. This style of music originated in Europe and has since brought new talents to America including, Icona Pop, Avicii, and Swedish House Mafia. In fact, Icona pop is set to have a concert in Portland, Oregon. Music is an aspect of pop culture that is so exciting because it evolves almost overnight through hierarchical diffusion. Everday I hear a new song on the radio and then next week it is at number 1. I like different and I say keep the tunes coming. 

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Bristol Palin: Why she backs Duck Dynasty patriarch's views on homosexuality (+video)

Bristol Palin: Why she backs Duck Dynasty patriarch's views on homosexuality (+video) | AP HUG | Scoop.it
Bristol Palin backs Phil Robertson's criticism of homosexuality on the grounds of free speech.
Holly Hough's insight:

I could not have been more excited when I saw this article pertaining to the recent scandal revolving around the famous bearded family of Louisianna. The patriarch of the family Phil Robertson made a controversial remark regarding the LGBTQ community. His morals and values come from a deep rooted faith and God, which suggests his opinion on being lesbian or gay. As a result of the statement many people are wanting to kick him off of the family televsion show; however, I see this as more than just the discontinuation of America's favorite show. I see it as an aspect of our culture. These quotes from the article sum up my thoughts completely.

          “This moment definitely says something about where we are as Americans,” says Rob Weiner, a pop culture expert at Texas Tech University. “For so long … the more traditional sort of down-home Christian good ol’ boy, living off the land, hasn’t been seen. Now that he has, he’s touched a nerve. A lot of people find the show entertaining, but equal numbers of people find it offensive – the killing of animals and things like that.”

          The attempt by gay rights groups to have Phil Robertson kicked off the show “may be an attack on ‘unsophisticated’ country folks as much as it is an attack on orthodox Christianity,” writes Matt Lewis, a conservative columnist for the Daily Caller. “It has as much to do with class and geography and culture and attitude as it does with religion.”

I agree with Matt Lewis completely. It darkens that bold line between the old-fashioned God fearing people of America and the free thinking  21st century Americans. These two different types of people have different ethics and values thus shaping their views about certain things, which adds to cultural diversity. Personally, I feel that he has every right to say what he feels as long as it is in a respectful manner. It's hypocritical for someone to speak out for equal rights and then want for someone to be punished for disagreeing. 

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'We’re Not This Alien Group': Chinese Students on Fitting In at U.S. Colleges

'We’re Not This Alien Group': Chinese Students on Fitting In at U.S. Colleges | AP HUG | Scoop.it

"Four Chinese students have taken to YouTube to explain the social misunderstandings that block many foreign students—particularly those from Asia—from integrating with the slang-speaking, booze-guzzling Americans."


Via Seth Dixon
Holly Hough's insight:


Would you look at that? Wisconsin makes the news once again, but this time it’s about the Asian students who attend Madison University. Chinese enrollment has increased by 356 percent within the last decade. The cultural and social barriers have made it hard for the Asian students to assimilate into American culture. Here in America, our culture has adopted this idea that Asian people are geniuses and/or “nerds.” In Asian countries there is not a heavy emphasis on partying and drinking booze. As we all know Madison is known as one of the biggest party schools in the world. In China education is the utmost important. They aren’t here to party. This anti-party lifestyle leads to social isolationism. It doesn’t help that the foreign students aren’t accustomed to the version of slang in the english language. They often result to speaking mandarin with the other Chinese students. Aside from the education and language differences, the Chinese women often don’t fit the beauty standards set by the American boys. Coupled together, these cultural differences lead students to feel that they aren’t accepted by their peers. In fact, one in four of the Chinese students drop out of college.  As a result, a group of Chinese students at Madison, have set out on a mission to help their American peers better understand their lives. Hopefully, we will see the dropout rates decline as the Chinese students learn to assimilate and the American students learn to appreciate the Chinese culture.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 4, 2013 4:03 PM

This is a great cultural insight into the social struggles and cultural clashes that Chinese students studying in the United States face on a daily basis.  Adapting, adopting or simply dealing with new cultural norms can be quite difficult.  Especially watch the video linked at the end of the article.    

Hye-Hyun Kang's curator insight, December 8, 2013 11:06 PM

Chinese enrollment has increased by 365 percent but about one fourth of those students don't finish school and go back to China. Major reasons for leaving was not being able to interact and to adjust to American culture. When Americans see Chinese students talking to each other other in Mandarin, they make a comment, "You're in America. You should speak English." Many Chinese students chose to speak Mandarin rather than English because it is their native language. Also, many students that are coming from China learned how to get good grades in American schools not how to communicate in English. In the video, two students point out that yes international students should try their best to improve their language, but they shouldn't feel bad for speaking their own native language.