AP Government Class Readings
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Congress Vows To Step Up To Surveillance Policy Challenge - OPB News

Congress Vows To Step Up To Surveillance Policy Challenge - OPB News | AP Government Class Readings | Scoop.it
Congress Vows To Step Up To Surveillance Policy Challenge OPB News Whether from strong NSA supporters or agency critics, the reactions sounded similar: Congress intends to do much of the steering in the drive to overhaul the NSA's gathering of...
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Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty

Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty | AP Government Class Readings | Scoop.it

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:59 AM

See where the wealth and poverty are in America using this great map.

Chandrima Roy's curator insight, January 9, 2014 10:44 PM

wonderful

 

Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 2014 6:56 AM

This picture shows the cocentrations of poverty and affluence.  The areas hilighted in yellow show the areas which are wealthy and the dark blue showing the poor. This coincides with the amout of pay and the education levels in these countries. Areas such as Boston, New York and Washington show high cocentrations of affluence. These areas also have much higher education systems and more well -paid jobs. Countries which are highlighted in dark blue are countries with lesser education and lesser paid jobs. This shows the  extent at which poverty can affect a country.

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Study: Refusal to expand Medicaid is costing Texas billions - Dallas Morning News

Study: Refusal to expand Medicaid is costing Texas billions - Dallas Morning News | AP Government Class Readings | Scoop.it
Study: Refusal to expand Medicaid is costing Texas billions
Dallas Morning News
... it,” said Davidson, of the free market-oriented Texas Public Policy Foundation.
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Texas Conservative Steve Stockman to Challenge Senator John Cornyn

Texas Conservative Steve Stockman to Challenge Senator John Cornyn | AP Government Class Readings | Scoop.it
Steve Stockman’s challenge of John Cornyn, the second-ranking Senate Republican, offers the potential for yet another ideological showdown in the 2014 Republican Senate primaries.

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Pew Research on the Presidential Campaigns by Pew Research on Prezi

Using data from national public opinion surveys, Pew Research Center has tracked the shifts in public views on the issues, the makeup of the electorate and how the campaigns are engaging voters.
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Five lessons we can learn from George Washington’s Farewell Address

Five lessons we can learn from George Washington’s Farewell Address | AP Government Class Readings | Scoop.it

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Understanding Obamacare: A guide about the Affordable Care Act by POLITICO

Understanding Obamacare: A guide about the Affordable Care Act by POLITICO | AP Government Class Readings | Scoop.it
POLITICO's guide to Obamacare is an unbiased explainer of how the Affordable Care Act is supposed to work, and what's at stake for consumers, employers and physicians.

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President Obama Grants Pardons and Commutation | The White House

President Obama Grants Pardons and Commutation | The White House | AP Government Class Readings | Scoop.it

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Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth

Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth | AP Government Class Readings | Scoop.it

Nice visual on differences in income, with associated paper.  No stats needed here; a simple exploratory/observational curiosity is all you need.  A great starter for classroom discussions/lab activities. Start with this primer where you can see the distinct difference.


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Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 2014 7:28 PM

Well first of all I'd have to think on the bright side of life on the poor side. And on the other side, the rich side, I'd have to not take things for granted. On the poor side you'd have to use everything to it's limit and not waste a bit. While on the rich side it doesn't really matter that much.

Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 2014 8:16 PM
@Sherryn Kottoor made some excellent points about the pictures. In the diagram, it shows the poor vs. the rich. It clearly proves how there is a big difference between the two. The rich have more access to things, that the poor don't. The poor are also not as fortunate when it comes to living and education.
Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 4:47 AM

useful for Year 8 and Year 11 Geography units.

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Are You Smart Enough to Be a Citizen? Take Our Quiz

Are You Smart Enough to Be a Citizen? Take Our Quiz | AP Government Class Readings | Scoop.it
Ideas of the Year 2013

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The Catholic “Swing” Vote - Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life

The Catholic “Swing” Vote - Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life | AP Government Class Readings | Scoop.it
Read about historical trends in the Catholic vote broken down by demographics and political preference for the 2012 election.
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2012 Presidential Election Results - The Washington Post

2012 Presidential Election Results - The Washington Post | AP Government Class Readings | Scoop.it
Live results for the 2012 presidential election between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney.
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Nightly News: Gerrymandering: the recipe for dysfunctional government?

Nightly News: Gerrymandering: the recipe for dysfunctional government? | AP Government Class Readings | Scoop.it
Video on msnbc.com: The age-old practice of politicians re-drawing Congressional districts to find friendly voters, or, gerrymandering, has allowed members of the House of Representatives from both sides of the aisle to stay in power regardless of...

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Mason Paul Lyman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:41 PM

1. The House redraws the congressional districts every 10 years on the census in an attempr to make the districts lend their support to whoever the current party majority is.

2. Gerrymandering allows incumbents to get reelected multiple times. 

3. Have a computerized, neutral program that would create districts based on geography and demography. A program such as this would make it more difficult for incumbents to get reelected.

4. Yes, there are. One party could earn more votes than another but still lose the election.

5. No because it is an unhonorable way to earn the respective benefits.

Jessica Markle's curator insight, April 12, 2014 2:09 PM

gerymandering is the act of redrawing a district and its has gotten its name from Albridge Garry who redrew a district in the beginning of our country in order for him to win a vote. The redrawing of the districts almost guarantees a win in voting because it allows the politicians to choose their voters. In the video, suggested possible solutions to gerrymandering would be to redraw district lines according to geography, demographics, and population density but it would cause a disruption in the current system and would make it very difficult for a representative to be reelected to a district that doesn't have the same advantages. Gerrymandering can be compared to the electoral college because these systems don't work in the favor of the public, or the majority vote because with the representatives picking the districts containing people they know will vote for them along with the electoral college being able to override the public vote, it has caused question in the democratic system of the United States.

Lauren Sargent's curator insight, April 17, 2014 9:47 PM

The term gerrymandering comes from an 1810 law that was created by Elbridge Gerry, Governor of Massachusetts, which repositioned and defined congressional districts based on population changes. After the law was passed, newspaper articles came out with pictures of the re-drawn districts in concerning shapes, such as a salamander. They linked the two words “salamander” and “Gerry” and called it gerrymandering. As time has gone on, gerrymandering has been manipulated by both the Republican and Democratic parties by them re-drawing districts specifically to change the possible outcome of their “political cartoon” if you will. House seats are being re-apportioned every presidential election year. The video suggested that these means of politics have made it so that “the politicians are choosing their voters, rather than the voters choosing their politicians”. This is causing major distrust in candidates and decrease in voter participation. Gerrymandering has been beneficial to incumbents because they change their districts to work in favor of their election. Both the Electoral College and gerrymandering can be seen as unfair or corrupt government practices because they can sometimes both not accurately depict the peoples' votes by changing their districts. With the Electoral College, they could win a majority of the electoral votes, but not the majority vote. With gerrymandering, a politician would be elected just because of the re-drawn, manipulated districts, which is ridiculous.