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3 Handy Periodic Tables for Science Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

3 Handy Periodic Tables for Science Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Math & Science | Scoop.it

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Guide to Explanatory Writing in Science | The Biology Corner

Guide to Explanatory Writing in Science | The Biology Corner | Math & Science | Scoop.it
“ On August 6th, 2014, I had the opportunity to join a webseminar presented by the NSTA that discussed writing in science. A major theme of this seminar was SCAFFOLDING. The idea of scaffolding is that you break a task ...”
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Rethinking AP Biology - STEM Education (usnews.com)

Rethinking AP Biology - STEM Education (usnews.com) | Math & Science | Scoop.it
“ A new Advanced Placement biology curriculum makes students think like scientists.”
Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Scientists turn primitive artificial cells into complex biological materials

Scientists turn primitive artificial cells into complex biological materials | Math & Science | Scoop.it
It is a big dream in science: To start from scratch with simple artificial microskopic building blocks and end up with something much more complex: living systemts, novel computers or every-day materials. For decades scientists have pursied the dream of creating artificial building blocks that can self-assemble in large numbers and reassemble to take on new tasks or to remedy defects. Now researchers from University of Southern Denmark have taken a step forward to make this dream come true.
Via Integrated DNA Technologies
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Cancer cells ‘reversed’ back with engineered ipeps

Cancer cells ‘reversed’ back with engineered ipeps | Math & Science | Scoop.it
Synthetic peptides are showing promise in their ability to prevent out of control tumour growth—and according to researchers are fast becoming the core of new therapeutic opportunities for cancer treatment.
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Social or stinky? New study reveals how animal defenses evolve

Social or stinky? New study reveals how animal defenses evolve | Math & Science | Scoop.it
“ Some animals are "eww" while others are "aww." Why do some animals use stinking secretions for defense, while others are social? In a new study, researchers found that noxious spraying was favored by animals that were nocturnal and mostly at risk from other animals, while sociality was favored by animals that were active during the day and potentially vulnerable to birds of prey.”
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DNA Structure and Replication: Crash Course Biology #10

“Hank introduces us to that wondrous molecule deoxyribonucleic acid - also known as DNA - and explains how it replicates itself in our cells. Like CrashCourse...”
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Special glasses help surgeons 'see' cancer​​​​​​​​ tissue during the operation

Special glasses help surgeons 'see' cancer​​​​​​​​ tissue during the operation | Math & Science | Scoop.it
“High-tech glasses may help surgeons visualize cancer cells, which glow blue when viewed through the eyewear. The wearable technology, so new it's yet unnamed, was used during surgery for the first time today at Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine.”The wearable technology, so new it's yet unnamed, was used during surgery for the first time today at Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine.Cancer cells are notoriously difficult to see, even under high-powered magnification. The glasses are designed to make it easier for surgeons to distinguish cancer cells from healthy cells, helping to ensure that no stray tumor cells are left behind during surgery."We're in the early stages of this technology, and more development and testing will be done, but we're certainly encouraged by the potential benefits to patients," said breast surgeon Julie Margenthaler, MD, an associate professor of surgery at Washington University, who performed today's operation. "Imagine what it would mean if these glasses eliminated the need for follow-up surgery and the associated pain, inconvenience and anxiety."Current standard of care requires surgeons to remove the tumor and some neighboring tissue that may or may not include cancer cells. The samples are sent to a pathology lab and viewed under a microscope. If cancer cells are found in neighboring tissue, a second surgery often is recommended to remove additional tissue that also is checked for the presence of cancer.The glasses could reduce the need for additional surgical procedures and subsequent stress on patients, as well as time and expense.Margenthaler said about 20 to 25 percent of breast cancer patients who have lumps removed require a second surgery because current technology doesn't adequately show the extent of the disease during the first operation
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Scent Of Your Earwax May Yield Valuable Information

The Scent Of Your Earwax May Yield Valuable Information | Math & Science | Scoop.it
“ Warning: It doesn't get any less gross from here.”
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Teaching Math on an iPad

Teaching Math on an iPad | Math & Science | Scoop.it
. 1. HIGH SCHOOLS AS IT WAS... In my High school, one of the last departments to realise a use for iPads was the Math department. Note: As a UK born New Zealander, writing Math and not Maths is dif...

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John Pearce's curator insight, August 8, 2013 5:13 AM

Richard Wells introduces some non-traditional maths apps which offer the chance to re-think what constitutes maths teaching. Worth considering at least. 

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, October 20, 2014 1:56 AM

This list is very well thought out - definitely some good apps here. I liked how he linked to explain Everything as a good app to start with in the maths classroom. All students at Prendiville have this app, and can create a neat video just by taking a photo of an equation and then explaining how they would solve it. 

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Writing in Science | The Biology Corner

Writing in Science | The Biology Corner | Math & Science | Scoop.it
The common core standards include a writing component for all educators of all grades, which can cause some mild anxiety among teachers who do not generally include writing as part of their instruction.Though some science teachers may require a research paper for their class, many high school science teachers do not include this in their curriculum, and I do not think that it is the intent of the core standards to push for term papers in every course.
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Andrew Hessel: Biotechnology, Genetic Engineering and Future of Life Science

Andrew Hessel: Biotechnology, Genetic Engineering and Future of Life Science | Math & Science | Scoop.it
Andrew Hessel is the Distinguished Researcher with Autodesk and co-chair of Bioinformatics and Biotechnology at the Singularity University.
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New study examines thousands of brains to reveal differences between male and female brain structure

New study examines thousands of brains to reveal differences between male and female brain structure | Math & Science | Scoop.it
Reviewing over 20 years of neuroscience research into sex differences in brain structure, a Cambridge University team has conducted the first meta-analysis of the evidence, published this week in the prestigious journal Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. The team, led by doctoral candidate Amber Ruigrok and Professors John Suckling and Simon Baron-Cohen in the Department of Psychiatry, performed a quantitative review of the brain imaging literature testing overall sex differences in total and regional brain volumes. They searched all articles published between 1990 and 2013. A total of 126 articles were included in the study, covering brains from individuals as young as birth to 80 years old.They found that males on average have larger total brain volumes than women (by 8-13%). On average, males had larger absolute volumes than females in the intracranial space (12%; >14,000 brains), total brain (11%; 2,523 brains), cerebrum (10%; 1,851 brains), grey matter (9%; 7,934 brains), white matter (13%; 7,515 brains), regions filled with cerebrospinal fluid (11.5%; 4,484 brains), and cerebellum (9%; 1,842 brains). Looking more closely, differences in volume between the sexes were located in several regions. These included parts of the limbic system, and the language system.Specifically, males on average had larger volumes and higher tissue densities in the left amygdala, hippocampus, insular cortex, putamen; higher densities in the right VI lobe of the cerebellum and in the left claustrum; and larger volumes in the bilateral anterior parahippocampal gyri, posterior cingulate gyri, precuneus, temporal poles, and cerebellum, areas in the left posterior and anterior cingulate gyri, and in the right amygdala, hippocampus, and putamen.By contrast, females on average had higher density in the left frontal pole, and larger volumes in the right frontal pole, inferior and middle frontal gyri, pars triangularis, planum temporale/parietal operculum, anterior cingulate gyrus, insular cortex, and Heschl’s gyrus; bilateral thalami and precuneus; the left parahippocampal gyrus, and lateral occipital cortex.The results highlight an asymmetric effect of sex on the developing brain. Amber Ruigrok, who carried out the study as part of her PhD, said: “For the first time we can look across the vast literature and confirm that brain size and structure are different in males and females. We should no longer ignore sex in neuroscience research, especially when investigating psychiatric conditions that are more prevalent in either males or females.”
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Michelle
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Using photosynthesis to generate fresh water

Using photosynthesis to generate fresh water | Math & Science | Scoop.it
Water covers more than 70% of Earth’s surface but less than 2% of it is available as freshwater. Many of the driest regions of our planet are close to the sea but irrigating fields with seawater – even if diluted – leads to build-up of salt in the soil to levels toxic to all common food crops. Current desalination technologies, such as membrane-based reverse osmosis, are successfully used in large-scale desalination plants, but they are expensive and energy inefficient.
Via Integrated DNA Technologies
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Understanding the basic biology of bipolar disorder

Understanding the basic biology of bipolar disorder | Math & Science | Scoop.it
“(Medical Xpress)—Scientists know there is a strong genetic component to bipolar disorder, but they have had an extremely difficult time identifying the genes that cause it.”
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Why Do We Love Chocolate?

Why Do We Love Chocolate? | Math & Science | Scoop.it
“ Our love affair with chocolate is nothing new, but in recent years scientists have tried to uncover the source of our cocoa cravings. Scientific American editor Dina Fine Maron digs through the available evidence, looking for a morsel of truth.”
Via Kathy Bosiak
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New study examines thousands of brains to reveal differences between male and female brain structure

New study examines thousands of brains to reveal differences between male and female brain structure | Math & Science | Scoop.it
Reviewing over 20 years of neuroscience research into sex differences in brain structure, a Cambridge University team has conducted the first meta-analysis of the evidence, published this week in the prestigious journal Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. The team, led by doctoral candidate Amber Ruigrok and Professors John Suckling and Simon Baron-Cohen in the Department of Psychiatry, performed a quantitative review of the brain imaging literature testing overall sex differences in total and regional brain volumes. They searched all articles published between 1990 and 2013. A total of 126 articles were included in the study, covering brains from individuals as young as birth to 80 years old.They found that males on average have larger total brain volumes than women (by 8-13%). On average, males had larger absolute volumes than females in the intracranial space (12%; >14,000 brains), total brain (11%; 2,523 brains), cerebrum (10%; 1,851 brains), grey matter (9%; 7,934 brains), white matter (13%; 7,515 brains), regions filled with cerebrospinal fluid (11.5%; 4,484 brains), and cerebellum (9%; 1,842 brains). Looking more closely, differences in volume between the sexes were located in several regions. These included parts of the limbic system, and the language system.Specifically, males on average had larger volumes and higher tissue densities in the left amygdala, hippocampus, insular cortex, putamen; higher densities in the right VI lobe of the cerebellum and in the left claustrum; and larger volumes in the bilateral anterior parahippocampal gyri, posterior cingulate gyri, precuneus, temporal poles, and cerebellum, areas in the left posterior and anterior cingulate gyri, and in the right amygdala, hippocampus, and putamen.By contrast, females on average had higher density in the left frontal pole, and larger volumes in the right frontal pole, inferior and middle frontal gyri, pars triangularis, planum temporale/parietal operculum, anterior cingulate gyrus, insular cortex, and Heschl’s gyrus; bilateral thalami and precuneus; the left parahippocampal gyrus, and lateral occipital cortex.The results highlight an asymmetric effect of sex on the developing brain. Amber Ruigrok, who carried out the study as part of her PhD, said: “For the first time we can look across the vast literature and confirm that brain size and structure are different in males and females. We should no longer ignore sex in neuroscience research, especially when investigating psychiatric conditions that are more prevalent in either males or females.”
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.