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Adults at Higher Risk of Suicide Attempt if Parent Abused Alcohol, Research Finds

Adults at Higher Risk of Suicide Attempt if Parent Abused Alcohol, Research Finds | AOD Reseach | Scoop.it

Having divorced parents who also abused alcohol did not increase suicide risk, according to study

 

 People who grew up with a parent who abused alcohol may be 85 percent more likely to attempt suicide than people whose parents did not abuse alcohol, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

 

Furthermore, having divorced parents increased by 14 percent the risk that a person would try to take his or her own life when compared to people whose parents did not divorce, the study found. But putting those two factors together — parents who abuse alcohol and are divorced — did not increase suicide attempts, according to the study, coming out in the May issue of APA’s American Journal of Orthopsychiatry. 

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The non-medical use of tramadol in the UK: findings from a large community sample.

The non-medical use of tramadol in the UK: findings from a large community sample. | AOD Reseach | Scoop.it
AbstractBACKGROUND:

Prescription drug misuse has become a public health problem in several developed countries. In the UK, there has been no increase in people seeking treatment for prescription drug dependence, but there has been a progressive rise in fatal overdoses involving tramadol.

OBJECTIVES:

To explore the source, motivations for use and patterns of use of tramadol in the UK.

METHODS:

We conducted anonymous online survey of drug use and related behaviours as part of an ongoing drug trend monitoring initiative. We included questions assessing the patterns of use, source and function of tramadol.

RESULTS:

UK Survey respondents (n = 7360) were predominantly young (mean age 29), and 90% reported being employed or studying. Less than 1% reported past-year use of heroin or methadone, but about 1/3 reported past-year use of cocaine. 326 (5% of respondents) reported having used tramadol in the preceding year, usually obtained by prescription but in 1/3 of cases from a friend; rarely from a dealer or from the internet. Most used the drug for pain relief, but 163 respondents (44%) reported using tramadol for reasons other than pain relief - particularly, using it to relax, to sleep, to get high or to relieve boredom. Nineteen per cent took doses higher than prescribed, and 10% reported difficulty discontinuing. Twenty-eight per cent combined tramadol with alcohol or other drugs to enhance its effect.

CONCLUSION:

Misuse and sharing of tramadol, supplied by prescription, was common.

AbstractBACKGROUND:

Prescription drug misuse has become a public health problem in several developed countries. In the UK, there has been no increase in people seeking treatment for prescription drug dependence, but there has been a progressive rise in fatal overdoses involving tramadol.

OBJECTIVES:

To explore the source, motivations for use and patterns of use of tramadol in the UK.

METHODS:

We conducted anonymous online survey of drug use and related behaviours as part of an ongoing drug trend monitoring initiative. We included questions assessing the patterns of use, source and function of tramadol.

RESULTS:

UK Survey respondents (n = 7360) were predominantly young (mean age 29), and 90% reported being employed or studying. Less than 1% reported past-year use of heroin or methadone, but about 1/3 reported past-year use of cocaine. 326 (5% of respondents) reported having used tramadol in the preceding year, usually obtained by prescription but in 1/3 of cases from a friend; rarely from a dealer or from the internet. Most used the drug for pain relief, but 163 respondents (44%) reported using tramadol for reasons other than pain relief - particularly, using it to relax, to sleep, to get high or to relieve boredom. Nineteen per cent took doses higher than prescribed, and 10% reported difficulty discontinuing. Twenty-eight per cent combined tramadol with alcohol or other drugs to enhance its effect.

CONCLUSION:

Misuse and sharing of tramadol, supplied by prescription, was common.

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Tailoring a family-based alcohol intervention for Aboriginal Australians, and the experiences and perceptions of health care providers trained in its delivery

Aboriginal Australians experience a disproportionately high burden of alcohol-related harm compared to the general Australian population. Alcohol treatment approaches that simultaneously target individuals and families offer considerable potential to reduce these harms if they can be successfully tailored for routine delivery to Aboriginal Australians. The Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) and Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) are two related interventions that are consistent with Aboriginal Australians’ notions of health and wellbeing. This paper aims to describe the process of tailoring CRA and CRAFT for delivery to Aboriginal Australians, explore the perceptions of health care providers participating in the tailoring process, and their experiences of participating in CRA and CRAFT counsellor certification.
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Cape York cannabis project

Cape York cannabis project | AOD Reseach | Scoop.it

The Cape York cannabis project is facilitated by James Cook University (JCU), and aims to work with remote communities in Cape York, Queensland (Qld) to reduce the demand of cannabis. This project differs from the Weed it out project, run by the Qld Police Service, which focuses on cannabis supply reduction. The Cape York cannabis project focuses on community concerns for health, family, or work, rather than dealers or supply. This project is active in three communities - which will not be named in any media or academic publication - and has the potential to help other remote communities with similar issues around cannabis use.

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