CUS3.3 the influence of current events. Anzac Day.
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The First World War and the Anzac Legend

Ann Eagles's insight:

This is a great teaching resource as it is full of activities stage 3 students can use with scaffolding from the teacher. The resource gives information about Australia's link to Britain, why Australia went to war in 1914, what happened at Gallipoli, Ashmead Barlett's account of the Gallipoli war, the Anzac Legend, Western front, what is happening at the Australian Front and conscription.

 

Teaching activity: Students have already completed lessons on the First World War and the Anzac Legend. What was British involvement in creating an Australian identity? Students look at page 92. In pairs, students divide their paper into a "T-chart" (Hancock & Leaver, 2006, p. 63). They list the connections Australia had with Britain before 1914. Students then highlight and list the reasons why Australia started to break away from Britain on page 2 on  http://www.ictbin.com/aw/background/anzaclegends-museumvictoria-anzacw.pdf    on the opposite side of the T-chart. A T-chart is a "graphic organiser" (Hancock & Leaver, p. 63), which is used to help students organise their thoughts. The students are to present their findings to the rest of the class. They add their answers to one T-chart that is in front of the class. In groups, the students do a "think, pair, share"  (Hancock & Leaver, p. 67) activity, where they think what response they could give and then they discuss what they think the answer is to what the British involvement was in creating an Australian identity. They then share their answers to another pair in the class. The teacher sums up by asking one person from each group what response they had come up with.

 

Literacy strategy: Students scan the texts to find the information. Students think and locate vocabulary.

 

Reference: Hancock, J., & Leaver, C. (2006). Teaching Strategies for Literacy. Norwood, S. Aust.: Australian Literacy Educators Association.

 

Webb. (2008). The First World War and the Anzac Legend. Cambridge University Press. Retrieved fromhttp://www.ictbin.com/aw/spirit/cambridge-kenwebb-sample_1_730549.pdf

 

Willoughby, E. (n.d.). Our Federation Journey 1901-2001. Retrieved from http://www.ictbin.com/aw/background/anzaclegends-museumvictoria-anzacw.pdf

 

 

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Dean Dray's curator insight, August 13, 2014 9:02 AM

Excellent resource from a friend from Uni

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Gallipoli: The First Day - 3D Interactive Site | Australian Broadcasting Corporation

An ABC 3D documentary site about the WW1 ANZAC landing at Gallipoli, on 25 April 1915.

Via Louise Zarmati, Catherine Smyth
Ann Eagles's insight:

This resource is great for students to explore. The students are able to get a 3D animated version of what happened at Gallipoli. There is a section on the website where there are a selection of soldiers profiles from the different armies.

 

Teaching Activity: Students have watched the events of Gallipoli on a previous lesson. How did Ellis Ashmead-Barlett's involvement in Gallipoli help to contribute to Australia's identity? The class is split into 4 groups. Each group makes a mind map on each resource to answer the posed question. The groups then do the "gallery walk" (On the Cutting Edge, 2005) where they move around the room and contribute to the answers on each mind map. Each group then presents each mind map's answers to the rest of the class. The students focus on the interview of Les Carlyon, which is in the resource. They further explore Ashmead-Barlett by looking at the sources from Activity 2http://www.anzacday.org.au/education/activities/anzacday/images/anzacday.pdf and and http://www.awm.gov.au/exhibitions/dawn/legend/ashmead.asp. The students look at the account, written by Ashmead-Barlett about the Anzac landing, on page 100 on http://www.ictbin.com/aw/spirit/cambridge-kenwebb-sample_1_730549.pdf .The teacher scaffolds and helps students how to dissect and study the language used in the account. The gallery walk activity is used to encourage collaboration with peers, helps to construct knowledge as each student bring their own prior knowledge to each question, and promotes discussion and "team building" (NSDL, 2008). Literacy strategy: Dissect sentences and research what vocabulary was used to help romanticise the account.

 

Assessment activity: Students are to write a romanticised version account of a newspaper report, which informs readers of the Gallipoli landing. This is a formal "summative assessment" (Krause, Bochner & Duchesne, 2006, p. 407) as the teacher is checking that students have understood how to write a romanticised newspaper report and that they understand the events at Gallipoli. 

 

Reference: ABC (n.d.). Gallipoli The First Day. An ABC 3D documentary site about WW1 Anzac landing at Gallipoli, on 25 April 1915. Retrieved from http://www.abc.net.au/innovation/gallipoli/

 

Australian War Memorial. (n.d.). Dawn of the Legend: 25 April 1915. Ellis Ashmead-Barlett. Retrieved from http://www.awm.gov.au/exhibitions/dawn/legend/ashmead.asp

 

Krause, K., Bochner, S., & Duchesne, S. (2006). Educational psychology for learning and teaching (2nd ed.). South Melbourne: Thomson Learning.

 

 NSDL. (2008). Starting Point: Teaching Entry Level Geoscience. Why Use Gallery Walk? Retrieved from http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/gallerywalk/why.html

 

On the Cutting Edge. (2005). Designing Effective and Innovative Courses. Retrieved from http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/coursedesign/tutorial/strategies.html

 

Ryebuck Media and Australian Defence Force. (2003). Anzac Day What does it mean to you today? www.anzacday.org.au. Retrieved from http://www.anzacday.org.au/education/activities/anzacday/images/anzacday.pdf

 

 Webb. (2008). The First World War and the Anzac Legend. Cambridge University Press. Retrieved from http://www.ictbin.com/aw/spirit/cambridge-kenwebb-sample_1_730549.pdf

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Indigenous ANZACs

Indigenous ANZACs | CUS3.3 the influence of current events. Anzac Day. | Scoop.it
ANZAC day is a time when we remember the people who've fought for Australia in wars. For anyone, that takes a huge amount of courage and determination. But imagine fighting for a country that didn't even see you as a citizen. Sarah looks at the sacrifice of Indigenous soldiers and meets some young people making sure it's not forgotten. And a warning to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers; this story contains images of people who have died.
Ann Eagles's insight:

This is a news clip, which talks about the sacrifice of Indigenous soldiers in the First World War. The treatment of Indigenous soldiers in the war and back home in Australia is discussed. There is a focus of the Indigenous soldier Rufus Rigney, who had died in the war. This clip shows the viewpoint from soldier Rigney's ancestor. This is a great teaching resource as it links websites: Australian War Memorial, Australian Defence Force, Australian war Memorial, ABC and connecting spirits websites, giving students and teachers an easier accessibility to gain more information about Indigenous soldiers. 

 

From analysing this clip using the selection criteria for the evaluation of Aboriginal education K-12 resources, the clip is appropriate to use for a number of reasons. The clip is authentic as it was shown in 2013 and shows photos and named Aboriginal people and where they had come from. The material does show and talk about the name of a deceased person. It does not over-generalise Aboriginal people. There is a balance nature in the material. The material in the clip does discuss racism as it explains that Indigenous soldiers were treated differently in Australia to that when they were at war. The News clip warns the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders that there are people who have died in the clip this shows that they are respecting the beliefs of the Indigenous cultures. There is a section of the clip where an Aboriginal ancestor is performing a traditional dance to honour the fallen soldier. This is not stereotyping Aboriginal people, as it is a traditional dance.

 

Teaching Activity: Students are to go to their local cenotaph with a roll of honour and note down all the soldiers’ names. Students select names at random and research if these fallen soldiers were Aboriginal. Can students identify how many fallen soldiers there is on their local cenotaph and how many have these are Aboriginal? Students will write a personalised thankyou to the fallen soldier. The teacher needs to be respectful and consulate with the local community AECG (Aboriginal Education Consultive Group) to be able to go ahead with this activity. Before the students write the letter, an Aboriginal elder can come in and answer questions of what they think is appropriate to use in the letter. The teacher can scaffold with the class example words and sentences of what they think could go in the thankyou letter. Meyers and Nulty (2009) suggests maximising student learning, the experiences and tasks need to be "authentic, real-world and relevant." The visit to their local cenotaph and speaking to an Aboriginal elder helps make the task more authentic. The students using their local names of Aboriginal soldiers help personalise the war as the activity is localized and contributes to making an authentic task.

 

Literacy strategy: Students are learning appropriate vocabulary when relating to Aboriginal people. Numeracy strategy: counting.

 

Reference: 

ABC. (n.d.). Indigenous Anzacs. Behind the News [video]. Retrieved from http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s3744556.htm

 

Meyers, N, M., & Nulty, D, D. (2009). How to use (five) curriculum design principles to align authentic learning environments, assessment, students’ approaches to thinking and learning outcomes. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 34(5), 565-577. doi: 10.1080/02602930802226502

 

 

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Anzac Day Activities

Ann Eagles's insight:

This is a resource of teaching activities that are great to use with stage 3 students in the classroom when they are learning about Gallipoli and Anzac Day. The activities are set out in an "inquiry" (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 56) approach that students progress through. 

  

Teaching Activity: Students have previously learned about Ellis Ashmead-Barlett's and British involvement in contributing to the Australian identity. Students in groups, come up with vocabulary that they think sums up how the Anzacs have contributed to the Australian identity and shares with the class. Students are to focus on what they think an outsider from Australia would think about Anzac day and Australia's celebrations. In groups, they come up with ideas and share with the class. Students write their idea on the main white board. Students watch documentaries about past Anzac day celebrations and make notes of how they are celebrated and do they include people from different cultures? How are Anzac Day celebrations inclusive to different cultures? Some clips they can watch: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhGedIu8Kuw. They add these ideas to the main whiteboard. Schellens and Valcke (2005) explain that students are put in a collaborative group for individuals to be able to draw upon their "individual experience" to learn new information. Students exchange discourse to each other to "further cognitive processing" as they are helping each other with their learning. An extension to this activity would be that the students would prepare a survey and question 3 or 4 people at an Anzac Day parade using the information from question 38 on Activity 8. A further activity would be that students are to watch the clip http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s2551604.htm.

Students are to come up with an idea how to include all cultures in their school can celebrate Anzac Day. Students are to draw upon ideas from the teaching activity and the clip. 

 

Assessment: The teacher explains the assessment criteria prior to the activity. Students assess each other using a checklist to assess if students have contributed and can work together as a group (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p. 138).

 

Reference: ABC. (2014). Anzac Vigil. Behind the News. Retrieved from http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s2551604.htm

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. South Melbourne, Vic.: Cengage Learning.

 

Ryebuck Media and Australian Defence Force. (2003). Anzac Day What does it mean to you today? www.anzacday.org.au. Retrieved fromhttp://www.anzacday.org.au/education/activities/anzacday/images/anzacday.pdf

 

Schellens, T. & Valcke, M. (2005). Collaborative learning in asynchronous discussion groups: what about the impact on cognitive processing? Computers in Human Behaviour, 21, 957-975.

 

World News Australia. (2012). Anzac Day ceremonies held around the world [Youtube video]. SBS World News. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhGedIu8Kuw

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ANZAC Diversity | Australian War Memorial

ANZAC Diversity | Australian War Memorial | CUS3.3 the influence of current events. Anzac Day. | Scoop.it
Ann Eagles's insight:

This website has a diverse range of information about Anzac Day and other wars that Australia was involved in. The education section on this website has great activities and resources. The section on Anzac diversities looks at the different diversity of cultures in the First World War. The website is showing a global perspective as it informs the reader of the different soldiers who fought for the Australian army and what different nationalities the soldiers were that had made up the Australian army.

 

In pairs, the students are given a different soldier's name. They write a report concentrating on the questions: What nationality is he? What regiment is he in? What was his involvement in Gallipoli? Was he wounded? What type of soldier was he? Any other significant information? The students then become the role of their soldier. The class asks the student in the "hot seat" questions to find out information about the soldier. They can use the questions they already used to write the report and also can make up their own questions.

 

Literacy strategy: The hot seat activity helps students to understand the texts as they use the information from the report to answer the questions (Zweirs, 2004, as cited in Learning Point Associates, 2014).

 

Assessment: The teacher can use "formative assessment" (Krause, Bochner & Duchesne, 2006, p. 407) on the hot seat activity by giving informal feedback to the student during the activity. This helps the teacher to make any "corrective adjustments" (McInerney & McInerney, 2010, p. 361) to help their teaching to help the students learning. 

 

Further activity: The student's make their own wreath to honour their chosen soldier. These wreaths will be placed together to indicate that all soldiers are from different cultures but all make up the Australian identity as they fought in the same army and same war. This reinforces that everyone has come from different cultures but make up part of the same army that fights under the one flag. The student's also put a sum up of of their report with their chosen soldier's face.

 

Reference: Australian War Memorial. (n.d.). Anzac Day Case studies exploring multiculturism in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF). Retrieved from http://www.awm.gov.au/education/schools/resources/anzac-diversity/

 

Krause, K., Bochner, S., & Duchesne, S. (2006). Educational psychology for learning and teaching (2nd ed.). South Melbourne: Thomson Learning.

 

Learning Point Associates. (2014). Adolescent Literacy. Retrieved from http://www.learningpt.org/literacy/adolescent/strategies/hotseat.php

 

 McInerney, D. M., & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational psychology: constructing learning (5th ed.). Frenchs Forest, N.S.W.: Pearson Australia.

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