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Benjamin Zander - Work (How to give an A)

Teachers TV.Benjamin Zander talking on how simply you can motivate your students to win an A by giving them As right from the begining :)...

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Anytime Anywhere Learning
Thoughts on curiosity, creativity, innovation,technology, and design & their connection to learning & the reshaping of School.
Curated by Susan Einhorn
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8 Things to Look for in Today's Professional Learning (Part 1)

8 Things to Look for in Today's Professional Learning (Part 1) | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it

To be honest with you, professional learning in many cases needs an overhaul.  If the best thing that professional learning has to offer is lunch, we need to think different.  But how many educators are really excited about the types of professional learning opportunities that are offered in their school?  Like, “wake-up-in-the-morning-and-can’t-wait-to-get-to-work” excited? What is promising though, is that many schools are moving away from the traditional types of professional learning that weren’t working for staff, and trying some new ideas.


So where I thought I would start is taking each one of the elements shared in the “8 Things”, and try to share an idea that focuses on one of the elements specifically, but obviously, each idea can have multiple elements.

Here is each element with the corresponding letters to identify them in each activity.

Voice (V), Choice (C) , Connected Learning (CL), Problem-Finders/Solvers (PFS), Reflection (R) , Self-Assessment (SA), Critical Thinking (CT), Opportunities for Innovation (INNO)


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Learning to See Data - New York Times

Learning to See Data - New York Times | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it
Developing instinctual learning can help scientists see patterns in the digital universe.
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Telepresence Robots Bring Teachers into Classrooms

Telepresence Robots Bring Teachers into Classrooms | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it
More schools are experimenting with telepresence robots that carry a teacher's image and can move around the classroom.


These are not the only schools to be using robots in the classroom.  Researchers in Switzerland have created a CoWriterrobot, which helps students build confidence in their writing skills.  Students are asked to teach the 23-inch tall robot to write by placing magnetic letters on a table and asking the robot to write the word.  The robot will then purposely write the word poorly, at which point the student must write the word correctly underneath.


“We believe that after a few hours of being the teacher, their barriers may vanish and they may recover enough self-esteem to move forward,” says Séverin Lemaignan, a researcher at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, in Lausanne. “Often it’s a matter not that they’re bad at writing, but that they feel they are bad at writing.”


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Timothy McInnes's curator insight, March 22, 5:27 AM

An article about how robots are even beginning to  replace our teachers schools.

Geoff Ahloy-Martin's curator insight, March 27, 5:50 AM

Nobody denies that education is of paramount importance. The use of remote teaching tools such as the Telepresence Robot allows the teaching of lectures and classes without requiring the presence of teachers in the classroom. With new technologies that also aim to break language barriers, this is the beginning of a technology that could deliver education to very remote corners of the globe.

Brock Nicholls's curator insight, March 27, 9:32 AM

Decarr, K (19 March, 2015). Telepresence Robots Bring Teachers into Classrooms. Education News.

http://www.educationnews.org/technology/telepresence-robots-bring-teachers-into-classrooms/


This is about the use of robots as teachers in the classroom. The robots discussed in the article don’t seem very smart but if the technology is advanced then we could possibly see robots replacing teachers in numerous places. This source gives us a starting idea of what robots would be like in classes.

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Singapore's New “Learning Hub” Rethinks University Classroom Design in the ... - Slate Magazine (blog)

Singapore's New “Learning Hub” Rethinks University Classroom Design in the ... - Slate Magazine (blog) | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it

Heatherwick Studio’s first major new building in Asia, the Learning Hub, which opened Tuesday at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, is an answer to the question of how to build a 21st-century learning institution in an era when you can get higher education via smartphone and the college library is now accessible from virtually anywhere.

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How Steve Jobs Brought the Apple II to the Classroom

How Steve Jobs Brought the Apple II to the Classroom | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it

In September 1982, California Governor Jerry Brown signed a similar version of the Computer Equipment Contribution Act, AB 3194, which allowed a 25% tax credit against the state corporate income tax for computer equipment donated to schools. According to the California State Assembly Office of Research, “proponents of this bill feel that computer literacy for children is becoming a necessity in today’s world. They state that this bill will aid placing needed ‘hardware’ in schools unable to afford computers in any other way.


So in turn, under its Kids Can’t Wait program, Apple donated a computer to each of the roughly 9000 eligible elementary and secondary schools in California. 


"…The concern over training teachers to use these Apples is scaring some administrators. An administrator in the San Juan Unified School District near Sacramento, the state capital, is “frightened” of what the giveaway program could do to educational computing."

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A Personal Computer for Children of All Ages. Alan Kay 1972 @mprove

A Personal Computer for Children of All Ages. Alan Kay 1972 @mprove | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it

What we would like to do in this brief note is to discuss some aspects of the learning process which we feel can be augmented through technological media. Most of the notions have at their root a number of theories about the child. We feel that a child is a "verb" rather than a "noun", an actor rather than an object; he is not a scaled-up pigeon or rat; he is trying to acquire a model of his surrounding environment in order to deal with it; his theories are "practical" notions of how to get from idea A to idea B rather than "consistent" branches of formal logic, etc. We would like to hook into his current modes of thought in order to influence him rather than just trying to replace his model with one of our own.

 

We do not feel that technology is a necessary constituent for this process any more than is the book. It may, however, provide us with a better "book", one which is active (like the child) rather than passive. It may be something with the attention grabbing powers of TV, but controllable by the child rather than the networks. It can be like a piano: (a product of technology, yes), but one which can be a tool, a toy, a medium of expression, a source of unending pleasure and delight...and, as with most gadgets in unenlightened hands, a terrible drudge!!

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How the Photocopier Changed the Way We Worked—and Played

How the Photocopier Changed the Way We Worked—and Played | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it
Decades before 3-D printers brought manufacturing closer to home, copiers transformed offices, politics and art

 

For centuries, if you weren’t going to the trouble of publishing an entire book, copying a single document was a slow, arduous process, done mostly by hand. Inventors had long sought a device to automate the process, with limited success. Then in 1959, Xerox released the “914”—the first easy-to-use photocopier. The explosion of copying began. 


“It was a huge change in the amount of information moving around,” said David Owen, author of Copies in Seconds, a history of Xerox.

Indeed, it transformed the pathways through which knowledge flowed in a corporation.

 

Copying also infected everyday life. The bizarre welter of things being replicated ade even the folks at Xerox worry they had unleashed Promethean forces.

Susan Einhorn's insight:

Fascinating, especially if you thought this flood of info, junk, and other copied materials started with the internet.

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(25 Years Ago) The First School One-to-One Laptop Program

(25 Years Ago) The First School One-to-One Laptop Program | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it
The History of the Future of Education Technology

 

February 12 marks the 25th anniversary of the first school one-to-one laptop program. That is, one computing device for each student.

Contrary to a narrative that posits education technology is new and all education technology innovation originates in Cupertino, California (that is, Apple’s headquarters) or Redmond, Washington (Microsoft’s) or even Cambridge, Massachusetts (MIT and Harvard), this “first” occurred at the Methodist Ladies’ College, an independent girls’ school in Melbourne, Australia.

Susan Einhorn's insight:

A reminder for everyone. And another tribute to MLC's vision: http://www.aalf.org/blog.php/SusanEinhorn/view?PostID=

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The First Teaching Machines

The First Teaching Machines | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it
B. F. Skinner is often credited as the inventor of the “teaching machine.” While no doubt the phrase is often associated with his name and with his behaviorist theories, he was hardly the first person to design a machine for teaching.

 

In the 1960 book Teaching Machines and Programmed Learning: A Source Book, A. A. Lumsdaine argues that to count as teaching machines, devices must have the following properties:

"First, continuous active student response is required, providing explicit practice and testing of each step of what is to be learned.


Second, a basis is provided for informing the student with minimal delay whether each response he makes is correct, leading him directly or indirectly to correction of his errors.

Third, the student proceeds on an individual basis at his own rate — faster students romping through an instructional sequence very rapidly, slower students being tutored as slowly as necessary, with indefinite patience to meet their special needs."

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The Modern Virtual Classroom Is Global, Mobile, and Social

The virtual classroom has evolved, and expectations for quality are higher than ever. Some organizations have been teaching and learning this way for over a decade, and are ready to bring their virtual learning design and delivery to the next level to ensure virtual delivery is meeting, and potentially exceeding, the traditional classroom experience. 

After your organization has implemented specialized techniques in support of virtual instructional design and virtual facilitation, what do designers and facilitators need to become masters at their crafts? 


Via EDTC@UTB
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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, January 11, 5:01 PM

I can't and won't dispute these trends. As in anything, I think we have to be careful to assess what makes the most sense for the organization, for its employees, and for its customers/end users. Just as different learning approaches can work in K-20 classrooms, so can these learning approaches work elsewhere. The learning goals matter, regardless of the age or situation of the learner.

David W. Deeds's curator insight, January 12, 11:24 AM

Check this out! 

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A Beautiful Visual Explaining The Internet of Things ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

A Beautiful Visual Explaining The Internet of Things ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it
A Beautiful Visual Explaining The Internet of Things ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning http://t.co/1A6bCKiAdX
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elearn Magazine: The Significance of Educational Technology History and Research

What impacts learning are changes in instructional design and pedagogical practices supported by the introduction of new technologies, not the technology itself.

 

We still have a lot to learn about digital education. Rather than continuing to ask the same tired questions though, stakeholders need to search for answers to the questions for which we don't know much about: What is the nature of learning in digital learning environments? How do emerging technologies enable and support new approaches to teaching and education? How does our education system need to change to accommodate the learning needs of a global and networked society? And, how, and under which conditions, do emerging technologies foster the design of effective, powerful, and caring digital learning environments?


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7 Cyberlearning Technologies Transforming Education - Huffington Post

7 Cyberlearning Technologies Transforming Education - Huffington Post | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it

The year was 1984 and in addition to the chalkboards and alphabet posters, our 2nd grade classroom was equipped with an odd, beige box at a table in the back behind the students. It was an Apple II computer and over the course of the year we'd learn how to operate it - mainly to make a turtle-shaped cursor shuttle across the screen.

We would get dedicated time to interact with the computer and, through trial-and-error and with a few tips from our teachers, I and hundreds of thousands of other students across America learned how to turn a turtle into a rocket ship or fill the screen with colors using a computer programming language called Logo on a platform that had less computing power than today's microwaves.

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The Learning Zone: Stepping Away from the Comfort Zone

The Learning Zone: Stepping Away from the Comfort Zone | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it

Have you ever been "in the zone"? As an instructional designer have you ever considered your job to be getting people OUT of their comfort zone? This is, as they say, where the magic happens...in the Learning Zone! The Learning Zone rests between the Comfort Zone and the Chaos Zone 


Good game designers figured it out.  The ideal game puts the gamer into the learning zone continuously. The mechanics of game design automatically forces players into new, increasingly more difficult, tasks as a way of constantly keeping players in the learning zone.


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AnnRobinson Wright's curator insight, March 25, 8:11 AM

:)

David W. Deeds's curator insight, March 25, 8:20 AM

Interesting stuff! 

Kirsten Wilson's curator insight, March 25, 10:59 AM

Excellent and brief article on teachers and students moving out of their comfort zone.

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An Identity Crisis: When Students See Themselves As Digital

An Identity Crisis: When Students See Themselves As Digital | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it

Students that have more control than ever over their own identity have, unsurprisingly, lost control of that identity.


Before the normalization of technology-addiction and the fetishization of being “connected,” that identity was more of a novel function or complementary tool than living space. But for students that rabidly send and receive versions of themselves and others through facebook, Instagram, Vine, tumblr, snapchat, and other emerging social channels, they’re (unwittingly?) coding an identity that not only is not within their control, but never was by design. The images and words–the social templates–have had the power all long.


By the quantification and commodification of a student’s “identity,” that identity becomes other. Over there. Not self. It’s not an identity anyone from even 20 years ago would recognize.


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New Learning Times : Biophilia Educational Project

New Learning Times : Biophilia Educational Project | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it

A strong element of the Biophilia curriculum is music making. In fact, following a performance at the New York Hall of Science in Queens, Björk’s co-designed Biophilia curriculum inspired workshops for middle school students to make Biophilia themed music on iPads. The goal of the Biophlia Project is to inspire students to learn more about natural sciences. On the website it states, "pupils not only get introduced to the world of musical theory, but through it they explore the wonders of black holes, crystals, moons, lightening, continental drift, gravity, viruses, axial tilt and DNA. 

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Outside the Skinner Box

Outside the Skinner Box | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it

We live in a historic moment in which new technologies, with enormous potential for giving agency back to the learner. At the core, these technologies connect timeless craft traditions (learning-by-doing) and remarkable technological progress in a fashion accessible to learners of all ages and affordable for schools.

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Paul Herring's curator insight, March 9, 7:21 PM

A great article and argument from Gary Stager!
"Schools need a bolder concept of what computing can mean in the creative and intellectual development of young people. Such a vision must be consistent with the educational ­ideals of a school."

Paul Herring's comment, March 9, 7:22 PM
Thanks Susan!
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Students will dance, act and design with core arts standards

Students will dance, act and design with core arts standards | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it
You think math and English have high standards? Try the arts.

The National Core Arts Standards were released in October. They update the initial standards released in 1994, which included instructional guidelines for dance, music, theater and visual arts.

The new standards add media arts such as animation, film, gaming and computer design. They emphasize developing artistic ideas, refining them, and following projects through to completion. They also require students to analyze artworks, including by examining societal, cultural and historical contexts.

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Leading The Future Of Learning Through Four Key Trends

I recently had the opportunity to speak at an event dedicated to ‘The Talent Revolution’ and organized by the Google Digital Academy. Most of the other speakers and attendees were from industry and shared insights and practices of talent recruitment, development, and retention. They highlighted some of the extraordinary opportunities currently being pursued by organizations armed with new digital tools and resources. My remarks sought to offer historical, social and institutional context for – and pose a few fundamental questions around – these far-reaching changes.


Among today’s challenges to these models, many of them brought by or associated with digital technologies, we might identify four tendencies.

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The Monsters of Education Technology

The Monsters of Education Technology | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it

I spent much of 2014 on the road, traveling and speaking extensively about education technology’s histories, ideologies, and mythologies.The Monsters of Education Technology is a collection of fourteen of those talks on topics ranging from teaching machines to convivial tools, from ed-tech mansplaining to information justice.

Susan Einhorn's insight:

A very thought-provoking, worthwhile read for anyone involved, connected to, interested in education, technology, and their intersection.

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The Internet Applied To Things And The Third Industrial Revolution

The Internet Applied To Things And The Third Industrial Revolution | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it
 There’s a new vanguard creating the future of the U.S. manufacturing economy.

 

Companies like MakerBot, TechShop and Kickstarter are playing a large part in fixing the breakdown between historical industrialized employment and manufacturing models, which people still depend on for work, and the more flat and networked world in which we now live.

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Unexpected Tools That are Influencing the Future of Education

Unexpected Tools That are Influencing the Future of Education | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it

Teachers have long known that struggles in the classroom are often a reflection of society as much as of academic ability. And beyond the many challenges related to rising poverty rates, there is the uniquely confusing moment in which society finds itself. Around the globe, economies are shifting away from machine-focused industries and toward human-powered creative industries. Many adults are caught in the middle of this awkward shift, educated for the industrial age but trying to make a living in the information age. In an uncertain moment, they can be nervous about letting young people find their own way forward.

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Outlook on technology: Safety at high speed

Outlook on technology: Safety at high speed | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it
Computing devices embedded in jewelry and glasses. Microchips tattooed into skin and sewn into clothing.

Schools in 2015 will spend less time discussing whether technology has a role in instruction—Einhorn believes that question is mostly resolved by the intense push for using Common Core.

“Once you have devices available for assessment, there is a greater impetus to look at them for other uses in the classroom,” she says. “There is also a greater understanding that this (use of devices) is what our kids know. They don’t even have a ‘before tech’ landscape to compare it to.”

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Academics Fear Distance Learning Will Force Business Schools To Close

Academics Fear Distance Learning Will Force Business Schools To Close | Anytime Anywhere Learning | Scoop.it
A survey of business school professors, deans and directors reveals that academics think learning tech will force universities to shut their doors or merge.

 

But tech also offers an opportunity, according to CarringtonCrisp. More than 90% of respondents said that technology will promote the growth of new business models, while 70% agree or strongly agree that technological innovation will bring new entrants to the business education market.

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Cláudio De Musacchio's curator insight, December 2, 2014 2:27 PM

Sabemos que as novas tecnologias estão modificando o tecido educacional, promovendo novas fontes e novos modelos de negócios. Não devemos prender nossas crianças aos preceitos de trabalho da era industrial. A nova geração quer fazer de outro jeito, possui ferramentas e compreensão de mundo contemporâneo, não pensa como as gerações anteriores. É lógico que virão outras empresas e que as novas organizações farão as antigas sucumbirem diante do novo, criativo, inventivo mundo novo.


Como Empresas Atuais Que se cuidem e Que procurem Aprender Rápido, a se adaptarem, tornarem-se Flexíveis AOS Novos Tempos, OU MESMO Serao engolidas Pelos Novos modelos de Negócios.