anti-racism framework
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worldwide fallout from the alleged "failure" of multiculturalism
Curated by Cindy Sullivan
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The Rise of Britain’s Islamophobic Right

The Rise of Britain’s Islamophobic Right | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
Repudiating multiculturalism has lately become obligatory among European leaders. According to a survey commissioned by the German Marshall Fund of the U.S., anxiety about immigration is more acute in Britain than in any other European country surveyed. And, as in the rest of Europe, in Britain—where the Muslim population has increased by seventy-four per cent, from 1.6 million to an estimated 2.8 million since 2001—concern about immigration is often a euphemism for concern about Islam. Fifty-two per cent of respondents to a poll of five thousand believed that Muslims create problems in their country. In an unseemly coincidence, as Cameron spoke thousands of Britons were preparing to take to the streets in Luton, thirty miles north of London. The occasion was the latest in a series of marches organized by a two-year-old group called the English Defence League. The E.D.L. bills itself as “a human rights organization that exists to protect the inalienable rights of all people to protest against radical Islam’s encroachment into the lives of non-Muslims.” Labour M.P. Jon Cruddas has called the E.D.L. “a dangerous cocktail of football hooligans, far-right activists, and pub racists.” The E.D.L.’s twenty-four demonstrations, in cities across the country, have resulted in hundreds of arrests. The writer spoke with Tommy Robinson, the E.D.L.’s leader (his real name is Stephen Lennon), in a pub called Charlie Browns. “We are the voice of the English people,” Robinson said. The E.D.L. has attracted more than ninety thousand supporters on Facebook, but it does not keep formal rolls. Unlike the Tea Party in America, the E.D.L. does not want to overthrow the Establishment. Its ideology is paradoxical, advocating revolt as a means of preserving the status quo. For now, the E.D.L. revels in the adrenal romance of vigilantism.
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Migration Boom - Web Extra (Australia)

Earlier this year, Insight spoke with skilled migrants in Melbourne who can't find work in their chosen occupation. Some are unemployed and are living off their savings, while others are working in menial jobs -- cleaning or working in petrol stations. They say potential employers tell them they do not have local experience.
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Moscow loosens pursestrings to fight racism and inspire patriotism

Moscow loosens pursestrings to fight racism and inspire patriotism | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
Moscow is planning to promote patriotism and combat nationalism – all at the same time.
Two separate public education programs have been announced, one intended to ease inter-ethnic tensions while the other hopes to inspire a love of all things Russian. Racial tensions have been on the rise in the capital: just this Monday someone threw Molotov cocktails at a synagogue in Moscow, and last December the city saw some of its worst race riots on Manezhnaya. Now, as well as a 110 million ruble ($3.9 million) anti-racism campaign, there are also plans to invest heavily in national pride. In 2012 the City Hall plans to spend 52 million rubles ($1.84 million) on the old Slavic spring festival Maslenitsa, the “Mastera” city competition will cost 19 million rubles ($670,000) and a patriotic camp called Slavic Unity will cost 90 million rubles ($3.2 million) each year. These events are aimed at inspiring national pride and patriotism among the younger generations of Muscovites.
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Living with Toronto's multicultural reality - Toronto Star

Living with Toronto's multicultural reality - Toronto Star | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
What’s a modern multicultural democracy to do? This question has been raised by the cultural contretemps at Toronto’s Valley Park Middle School. Located in the northeast section of the city, the school draws significantly from Thorncliffe Park — a neighbourhood with the highest concentration of Muslims in Canada. The area surrounding the school is a living testament to Toronto’s internationally recognized multicultural matrix. More than two-thirds of the area’s residents have arrived in the past two decades, principally from Pakistan, India and, in recent years, Afghanistan. With Muslim students representing 80 per cent of this year’s graduating class at Valley Park, principal Nick Stefanoff has allowed a Muslim prayer service during school hours for the past several years, led by a junior imam, with separation of boys and girls. Following a complaint, however, that such services violated a policy prohibiting religious instruction in public schools, a swirl of editorials, columns, letters to editors and blog posts has ensued. These raise a host of questions, including: What is the appropriate separation of church and state in the Canadian context? What is the acceptability of gender segregation in a public school? And, ultimately, what are the upper limits of Canada’s multicultural ideals and identity? As an exasperated Stefanoff recently told the Globe and Mail, “We’re doing something that’s working. . . Of all the things we’ve accomplished, this is one I’m proudest of, and now I’m second-guessing myself. But it is right.” As Stefanoff’s frustrated comments reveal, multiculturalism in the world’s most multicultural city exists not only at the level of ideals and government policy, but in the day-to-day, lived reality of work, school, play and public interaction. And it is perhaps this “rubbing-of shoulders,” community-level dynamic that holds the greatest promise for our multicultural future.
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Why awareness of cultural conflict matters

Why awareness of cultural conflict matters | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
When University of British Columbia Fulbright scholar Rumana Manzur travelled to Bangladesh to see her family in May 2011, her husband refused her permission to return to Canada to complete her master's degree. He accused her of cheating; when she argued back, he attacked her viciously, gouging out her eyes in front of their young child — a daughter who will now bear her own emotional scars for a lifetime.This shocking assault on a promising female student highlights an aspect of the internationalisation of universities that rarely comes up in policy discussions and news coverage of higher education.Internationalisation is not simply a neutral exchange of ideas and people, a seamless movement of excellent ideas and scholars from one nation to another. The less examined, negative and contradictory side of internationalisation seems to flare up in conflicts that we don't know how to resolve, conflicts of culture that inevitably affect lives and raise serious ethical concerns.A recent example is that of Australia, where Indian students have suffered racially motivated attacks and consequently the number of Indian applications to Australian universities has dropped. This has a direct effect on the economy. Canadian universities are now courting students in India to take Australia's share of the market.Off shore higher education creates a different set of ethical dilemma with issues of socioeconomic class, gender, politics, and sexuality. At New York University's Abu Dhabi campus students are recruited from only the most elite high schools worldwide. They receive better aid packages than regular NYU students, but are not allowed political protest, or to engage in "homosexual acts" on campus. In a country where activists can be arrested for criticising the government, what are the implications for this elitist outpost? What kind of "world citizens" will be educated there?These examples highlight problems with the predominant idea of university education, one still based on a western, liberal model where the university is an "island" of tolerance and reason, a bastion of democratic values. What happens when the walls are breached by racism, sexism, and homophobia; when the island must stay afloat amid authoritarian politics? There is no reason behind the violence inflicted on Rumana Manzur, and such actions can't be tolerated.
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[Audio]Racism As A Zero-Sum Game - NPR

NPRHost Michel Martin continues the conversation about anti-white bias with the study's co-author Michael Norton and Color Blind author Tim Wise. MICHEL MARTIN, host: Now we're going to hear from the author of that study we just told you about. Michael Norton is a professor at Harvard Business School. He and his co-author Samuel Sommers, a professor at Tufts, published an article that says whites see racism as a zero-sum game that they are now losing. The study's authors report that 30 percent of whites surveyed believe they have been the recipient of some kind of discrimination against them. And a significant number of whites believe this problem is more prevalent than racism against blacks. Michael Norton is with us now. And we're also joined by Tim Wise. He's a lecturer and author whose last book "Color Blind" deals with the state of race relations and affirmative-action in the U.S. and I welcome you both to the program.
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Racism: tackling enemy within - The Australian

Racism: tackling enemy within - The Australian | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
HARRY O'Brien as a child would scratch himself until he turned white, so desperately did he want to fit in with his suburban Perth peers. Tiger Bachar Houli hid his early football ambitions from his parents and later shielded his need for prayer from teammates until he felt confident enough to speak out. Richmond now has a prayer room set aside strictly for him, a player of Muslim faith. These were anecdotes two AFL stars shared yesterday with an audience containing several club chief executives and leaders from various community leagues around Victoria at a breakfast celebrating the competition's multicultural round. In what has been a troubling season for the AFL given a spate of incidents involving racial vilification, the message -- that everyone should be proud of who they are and receive respect accordingly -- is something the league has stressed for years. While it is widely acknowledged the AFL has made massive progress in reducing the instances of racism, incidents in recent weeks have shaken the league. Bulldog Justin Sherman was banned from playing at senior level for four weeks for abusing the Gold Coast's Joel Wilkinson, while Kangaroos rookie Majak Daw was visibly shaken when abused by a fan during a match at VFL level this year. Hawthorn star Lance Franklin was also targeted in a match in Launceston, while Port Adelaide pair Daniel Motlop and Danyle Pearce were vilified by fans at SANFL level. The AFL's football operations manager Adrian Anderson yesterday defended the penalty handed down to Sherman, who was allowed to play at VFL level, after the suspension was criticised. But Anderson said the league's role in the suspension had been misrepresented publicly. "The way the process works with conciliation, the player who has been offended against is very much a key player in what the outcome is," he said. "If the victim is not satisfied, it would have gone to the tribunal and he would have faced a lot more than four weeks." A representative from one league said they had encountered seven racially motivated incidents in the past month, while others reported similar problems. Anderson, though, believes the recent increase is partially due to players feeling more willing to tackle racism and raise incidents to ensure offenders are dealt with.
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Stop Using Iranian Women as a Political Football - Huffington Post (blog)

Stop Using Iranian Women as a Political Football - Huffington Post (blog) | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
Gender apartheid in Iran is as damaging to that society as racial apartheid was to South Africa. Don't legitimize it. FIFA's decision to ban Iranian women footballers from a game against Jordan last Sunday because they wore headscarves and not the approved cap had soccer lovers in a fit of rage all week. They accuse FIFA for being "agents" of their repression and of "Western" discrimination against Muslims. Please. Alyssa Rosenberg of Think Progress compares the situation to the rejection of multiculturalism in Western Europe. She writes, "[I]f we're really concerned with how women are perceived and treated in Muslim communities, it seems hugely counterproductive to adopt policies that force women to choose between abiding by the tenets of their faith and participating in activities that let them demonstrate their physical prowess and strategic intelligence." Say what? How do we even know these women's faith? Iranian citizens have no right to choose their faith. Iranian women have no choice in dress. Some don't have a choice in husband, or to divorce. There is no religious freedom in Iran. There is no freedom of expression. We actually have no idea how many Iranians are actually Muslim, yet we certainly know that no Iranian women -- Muslim or not -- can choose not to wear the hijab even if they don't believe in it. Most of those footballers would take it off if they could, as would most Iranian women, but they would face lashing and jail. I wonder how Ms. Rosenberg would feel living in a country that forced her to think and dress a certain way against her will, or does she think that kind of life is the reserve of only some women. Would she want the world to push back against that treatment, or let her play soccer on unequal and potentially dangerous footing? David Zirin writes in Al Jazeera that the FIFA decision feeds "profound Western ignorance regarding the position of Iranian women since the Islamic revolution." He describes the improved literacy rate since 1979 (does he honestly expect a nation of 70 million to go backward over a span of three decades?). He also points out that one out of three Iranian doctors is a woman. Oh well, that settles it then! Things can't be that bad for women in Iran since they can be doctors! How is it then that most Iranian women I know desperately wish to leave their country today? That things are good for them is news to my cousin who last month snatched her 14-year-old daughter and left Iran for San Francisco after the regime started mandating different textbooks for girls than those used for boys to start rolling back hard-won progress in education.
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Society blamed for racism in sport (Australia)

Society blamed for racism in sport (Australia) | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
Racism is yet again an issue for the Australian Football League. In Melbourne over the weekend, a player of Sudanese heritage was racially abused by a fan during a VFL (Victorian Football League) match and a media sporting identity was filmed confronting a St Kilda fan who he says was abusing an Aboriginal player. The AFL has put considerable effort into trying to end racism in Aussie rules football. But a former footballer and federal politician says the game is not to blame. It was big news when Majak Daw was taken by North Melbourne in the 2009 rookie draft. He became the first Sudanese-born player to join an AFL club. It was hailed as a big step forward for a league which has had problems with racism in the past. But over the weekend, Majak Daw was in the news again for all the wrong reasons. He was racially abused by a fan while playing for Werribee against Port Melbourne in the VFL. Majak Daw says he was deeply hurt by the abuse.
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The United States v Canada on Immigration

The United States v Canada on Immigration | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
As a matter of national policy, Canada actively solicits immigrants and has done so for years. The public supports this and the default political assumption is in support of continued immigration.According to a recent poll, only a third of Canadians believe immigration is more of a problem than an opportunity, far fewer than any other country included in the survey. Rather, Canadians are concerned about "brain waste" and ensuring that foreign credentials are appropriately recognised and rewarded in the job market? Being an immigrant is also no barrier to being a proper Canadian; in parliamentary elections earlier this month, 11% of the people elected were not native. This warm embrace isn't just a liberal abstraction; 20% of Canadians are foreign-born. It's well-known that Canada is an outlier among immigrant nations, but it is nonetheless interesting to consider in reference to the ongoing and heated debate about immigration in the United States. Why is Canadian public opinion so different from views in United States? One explanation was that Canadians see multiculturalism as an important component of national identity. In one public opinion poll, Mr Reitz said, multiculturalism was deemed less important than national health care but more important than the flag, the Mounties, and hockey. Irene Bloemraad, a sociologist at the University of California at Berkeley, picked up this theme. There wasn't such a thing as a purely Canadian passport, she said, until 1947. Canada was, psychosocially, very much a part of the British commonwealth until quite recently. When it came time to create a distinctively Canadian identity, the country included a large and vocal Francophone minority (as well as a considerable number of first peoples). The necessity of bilingualism contributed to a broader public commitment to multiculturalism, which persists today. Other factors allow Canada to be more inviting. The country has little reason to worry about illegal immigration. Like the United States, it shares a long southern border with a country suffering from high levels of crime, unemployment and income inequality. But there aren't millions of Americans yearning to get into Canada. To put it another way, the United States's buffer zone from the eager masses is a shallow river. Canada's is the United States. That reduces unauthorised migration to Canada and eases public anxiety about it. Canada also has a smaller population and lower birth rate than the United States—it needs immigrants for population growth.

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[Video] Go Back To Where You Came From

Six ordinary Australians, of varying ages and backgrounds, agree to challenge their preconceived notions about refugees and asylum seekers by embarking on a confronting 25 day journey in this new SBS doco - Go Back To Where You Came From. Tracing in reverse the journeys that refugees have taken to reach Australia, the series features unprecedented access to some of the most dangerous and desperate corners of the world. Go Back To Where You Came From - the world-first, three day TV event - is coming to SBS on 19, 20 & 21 June.
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Individualism the key to West's values

Individualism the key to West's values | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
As with so many political and moral concepts, the notion of multiculturalism is what English philosopher WB Gallie termed "an essentially contested concept".That means people who use the term do not agree on what falls within its ambit. For instance, lots of people use the term democracy but often they mean different things by it. For some it refers only to how decisions are made, by letting the numbers count. Others build in a morally pregnant "was this a good decision" component, so that outcomes they consider too illiberal don't count as democratic. The same general point applies to debates about multiculturalism. Different people use the term in different ways. In a sense they talk past one another. So for some it's just about being open-minded about other cuisines. For others, though, multiculturalism as a concept involves a dollop of cultural relativism, of implicitly suggesting that all cultures are pretty much equal and who are we to think ours is better. Now, often people on each side of such disputes try to win a debate by capturing the word itself, so they get all the rhetorical benefits of being on the side of democracy or of multiculturalism. I mention this because, in the latter sense of thinking all cultures are more or less equal, I am not a multiculturalist. It is plain to me that the Western tradition and culture in Australia has done more in the past few centuries to advance science (think antibiotics), to advance the status of women, to separate church and state and hence further freedom of speech, and to establish the rule of law than others. Those are plain facts and I see no reason to be embarrassed about saying so. So I would distinguish between multi-ethnicism and multiculturalism. People who think one race is better than another are plain ignorant, about genetics and a whole lot more. But people who think some cultures are likelier to produce more learning, more wealth, more happiness than others are saying something wholly different, something factually correct. That's why British Prime Minister David Cameron says multiculturalism has failed. He says the West needs a "muscular liberalism" that defends our core values.
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Massacre exposes incendiary immigration issue | Reuters

Massacre exposes incendiary immigration issue | Reuters | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
Norwegian Anders Behring Breivik said he killed 93 people to spark a "revolution" against the multiculturalism he believed was sapping Europe's heritage, and experts say a frank debate about immigration may be the best way to prevent similar explosions of violence.In some Nordic countries, and elsewhere in Europe, political parties have fed on rising public concern over immigration as economic conditions worsen and a drip-feed of Islamist attacks stokes fear and suspicion of new arrivals. But experts argue overly aggressive political rhetoric and scare tactics have inflamed passions rather than address the many complex, underlying problems. Conflicting messages and political squeamishness in tackling immigration and multiculturalism have frustrated the public and given space for hardline ideologues, they say. "If the twin attacks in Norway fail to trigger an honest discussion of the issue, exposing often scare-mongering arguments used by the extreme right, this may marginalise the radical groups and worsen the situation, which in turn could bring more similar attacks in the future," said Lilit Gevorgyan, Europe analyst at the IHS Global Insight think-tank. "This is not just an issue in Norway. Across Scandinavia and also in Western and Eastern Europe, you have a lot of people who are very frustrated by the lack of open debate," she added. British Prime Minister David Cameron, Germany's Angela Merkel and France's Nicolas Sarkozy have all declared in recent months that multiculturalism has failed, in speeches that were otherwise careful to highlight the contribution of immigrants. But critics say such statements at best do little to offer solutions to tackle the economic and societal pressures that stem from increasing immigration and globalisation, and do even less to harness the benefits of a multi-ethnic society. Harald Stanghelle, political editor of Norway's Aftenposten conservative newspaper, said it was unfair to accuse Norway's anti-immigrant Progress Party of inflaming the passions of individuals such as Breivik, who was once a member. Stanghelle says Breivik left the party because it did not go far enough in representing his views, highlighting a dilemma for those who say parties that drive away those with fringe views on immigration risk creating militant underground groups. "It's totally wrong to hold the Progress Party responsible for extremists like this. A few smaller, anti-immigration groups, anti-multicultural groups, have broken from the party because they believe it is too polite, too mainstream," Stanghelle said. Stanghelle was careful to paint Breivik as a lone extremist with little link to the wider discourse on immigration in Norway.
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Woman Refugee of 2011: Hidden racists coming into the open

Woman Refugee of 2011: Hidden racists coming into the open | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
Hidden racists have become more vocal in Finland and racism has turned more public, says Refugee Woman of the Year Saido Mohamed, Finnish public broadcaster YLE reported. "It's really confusing, the way multiculturalism has advanced in society, but at the same time racism is more widespread," Mohamed says. She believes that the attitudes of the True Finns Party and media writings have contributed to the rise of racism. "Those racists who were hidden feel that now they're allowed to say what they want. For their part, the media have written some harsh things," Mohamed noted. She hopes that everyone will join in the eradication of racism. "I hope there would be talk in Finland of zero tolerance for racism. There's no need to accept those who are hateful, not in any sense," Mohamed stresses. "Work can begin with the neighbours of people with immigrant backgrounds, for example. If anyone has any prejudice, it's worth getting to know the people. The prejudices will then most likely change." Mohamed, a Finnish citizen, moved to Finland from Somalia in 1992. She was then a teenager who was forced to flee from the civil war. Now—a couple of decades later—she has built her life here. According to Finnish public broadcaster YLE "One should always remember that things are good in this country and it's good that immigrants can become part of the society. Each immigrant should also be proud to be Finnish."
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CELTIC JO's comment, July 23, 2011 6:57 PM
Very interesting article. Points made by Saido Mohamed re spread of multiculturalism and accompanying increase in racism also seem to apply in Australia, together with of course media inflammation.
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World Cup Final vs. Japan Brings Out the Racist, Ugly American

World Cup Final vs. Japan Brings Out the Racist, Ugly American | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
It's been nearly 70 years since Pearl Harbor but apparently the Women's World Cup Final has sparked racist hate-filled thoughts from Americans regarding the Japanese. As USA and Japan battle it out on the field to be the considered best women's soccer team in the world, Americans have taken to twitter to air some racist thoughts. The game has created numerous trending topics on Twitter including names of American players as well as "Japs" and "Pearl Harbor."Pearl Harbor is when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, killing thousands and spurring the American's entry into World War 2. It is considered one of the saddest days in American history. Japs is a racist term Americans and other allies used against the Japanese in WW2. People are using Twitter to express racist thoughts on the Japanese.
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Smoothing your accent to make yourself better understood

Smoothing your accent to make yourself better understood | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
But there’s no question that strong language skills are key to workplace success. A survey conducted in 2009 by Compas Research, for example, found that language skills were the biggest gulf between Canadian employers and highly skilled immigrants who were looking for a job. The survey found that 87 per cent of senior executives said inadequate language skills in English and French stopped them from hiring foreign-trained professionals – but few of those newcomers thought their language skills were inadequate. Phani Radhakrishnan, who teaches human resources and courses such as diversity in the workplace at the University of Toronto Scarborough campus, has mixed feelings about accent-reduction services. “When I first came here, I tried to make my Indian accent more Canadian, because I wanted to feel accepted,” she said. “Everyone talks about multiculturalism here, but what happens in the backyard is different. But it’s a personal thing, and I felt I was losing a part of my identity. So now I go with my original accent and it gives me more self-confidence.” Roland Sintos Coloma, a professor at the University of Toronto’s Centre for Integrative Anti-Racism Studies, finds the concept of reducing accents disturbing. “This speaks to a certain kind of linguistic racism,” Prof. Coloma said, adding that the idea of “making North American customers comfortable is silly, especially when you consider that there isn’t even a standard Canadian English accent. A person who lives in the Atlantic provinces will not sound the same as someone from the Prairies or Ontario,” he noted. But Randall Hansen, a Canada Research Chair in immigration and governance at the University of Toronto, said the tendency toward multiculturalism should be tempered with pragmatism. “It seems to me a kind of vacuous political correctness to suggest that acquiring a local accent won’t provide, in general terms, an advantage in the business world,” he said. “There is a lot of social-psychological research that has indicated when you speak the same language and have the same accent, that a person will assume … that you have a commonality.”
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Shahriyar Habib's curator insight, November 13, 2014 11:18 AM

Check this out, although it's right in some ways, I personally believe that you don't need to change your accent to feel accepted. You should not need to adapt to a new accent just to receive love from others."Should you really?," why are people being forced to change their accent, when people can't accept their 'voice.' In general you should not need to change the way you speak,  if someone questions something your saying,i reply in a such a manner that he/she won't question you ever again.

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Aggressive anti-racism campaigns can backfire

Aggressive anti-racism campaigns can backfire | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
Touting the benefits of tolerance, as opposed to trying to shame people for their prejudices, can be more effective in reducing racism, suggests a new study from researchers at the University of Toronto. Aggressive anti-racism campaigns might actually increase bias toward other groups, while messages emphasizing the personal stake one has in a more open-minded society can be most effective, says the paper, which will appear in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science. "Controlling prejudice reduction practices are tempting because they are quick and easy to implement," Lisa Legault, a researcher with the University of Toronto's psychology department, said in a statement. "They tell people how they should think and behave, and stress the negative consequences of failing to think and behave in desirable ways. "But people need to feel that they are freely choosing to be non-prejudiced rather than having it forced upon them." Legault said it would be more beneficial for anti-racism campaigns to emphasize the benefits of diversity and equality for all members of society with less focus on the negative aspects of prejudice. Ayman Al-Yassini, executive director of the Canadian Race Relations Foundation, said he is not surprised by the findings and said that his group tries to be positive in its messaging. "As much as we, as the Canadian Race Relations Foundation, feel there is a need to acknowledge the presence of racism when it exists, there's also a reality that we need to promote a better understanding of the issues related to discrimination, to racism and to promote these issues not through intimidation or creation of an atmosphere of fear or reprisal as much as the promotion of Canadian identity, a sense of belonging, commitment to Canadian values," he said. "These messages, I believe, are more powerful than communicating a message of retribution or having illegal implications."
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ready to confront your own racism? | Sarah Wilson

ready to confront your own racism? | Sarah Wilson | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
If you’re not born of a racial minority, are comfortably middle-class and you catch taxis then you might identify with this scenario. On Monday I climbed into a Melbourne taxi. “Airport please.” The Sudanese driver was playing Middle Eastern music and spoke basic English. He grunted in reply. Now, you might class me a small-L liberal (latte-sipping, bike-lane hogging, broadsheet-toting) multiculturalist. Which means I probably wouldn’t admit to having a particular “take” on this gentleman. Or his culture. Of course not.Which is why at the lights when he unwinds his window and yells excitedly in Arabic with his African mate in the next taxi I’m only mildly put out. I ask him what they were discussing. “Football!” he says with a massive grin. “I’m Western Bulldogs, my little sons Western Bulldogs fans. He’s Hawthorn.” He punches the air and cackles happily.Immediately my heart swelled. And I was flooded with all kinds of sappy jingoism – isn’t Australia incredible! He can barely speak English, but he’s adopted one of our passions. How wonderful! A reaction that served to blatantly expose the – ughhh! – prejudiced, threatened “take” I’d had when I first jumped in his taxi.Now, the interesting thing is only 45 minutes earlier I’d been speaking to Raye an Adelaide woman who lives opposite Inverbrackie detention centre. She’s just taken part in SBS’s timely documentary Go Back To Where You Came From (which screens THIS Tuesday – Thursday) that follows six Australians who challenge their particular “takes” on asylum seekers by personally tracing refugees’ journeys. Before setting out, Raye said the boatpeople who crashed at Christmas Island in December deserved their fate and that Middle Eastern people don’t deserve our help. “They’re ungrateful. And arrogant.”But then she set off to East Timor in a dodgy boat (that started to sink; they had to be rescued), spent time in a Malaysian refugee camp (where she witnessed Burmese asylum seekers being beaten with baseball bats) and lived in Kakuma camp in Kenya as a refugee with only refugee papers, a bowl and a mosquito net to her name. Raye says she could never imagine feeling such fear and hopelessness. Turns out it was the same camp where my taxi driver had spent seven years awaiting his freedom. I cried when he tells me this.
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Anti Racism Movement: HRW campaign: A good reminder

Anti Racism Movement: HRW campaign: A good reminder | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
Anti Racism Movement: ARM is a movement aiming at monitoring and documenting all forms of racism (sexism, classism, fatism, other isms) in Lebanon. The main focus of ARM is the slave-like conditions that most Migrant Domestic Workers (MDWs) in Lebanon are operating under and the racism they are exposed to endlessly, by law and people alike. MDWs are facing discrimination and oppression on daily basis, leading to an average of a weekly death case usually referred to as "suicide".
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Era of white privilege must end

Era of white privilege must end | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
Era of white privilege must endKansas City StarJust the other day, I was reading a column that used the phrase “white privilege.” The writer was interviewing couples who have experienced the positive and negative aspects of white privilege. I refuse to accept the premise that one race is far superior to any other. We need to judge people on an individual basis. Not because they belong to a particular racial group. Some of the things white people used to say about blacks (and vice versa) are being dispelled daily. When the races live together and grow together, we find people are people no matter what our color. We all are in pursuit of the American dream. White privilege, I still haven’t been able to get this phrase out of my mind. I can still see one of the three white women in the article using it at a checkout counter at a store. But hopefully this privilege is fading fast. In a few years from now, I don’t want a son of mine coming up to me and saying: “Daddy, why is it that when I’m with Mike (a white male) and we’re driving around everything’s cool? But when I’m by myself at night driving home from work, I’m frequently stopped by the cops?” I don’t wanna tell my boy, “In America you don’t have white privileges.”
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Majak Daw hailed for action against racist slur (Australia)

Majak Daw hailed for action against racist slur (Australia) | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
A RACIST fan has been banished from football as AFL stars launch their own fight against intolerance.A RACIST fan has been banished from football as AFL stars launch their own fight against intolerance. The Port Melbourne supporter will not be allowed back at a match unless he agrees to undergo a racial and religious vilification program following his ugly abuse of Kangaroo young gun Majak Daw. Daw's courage in standing against the abuse was last night hailed as heroic and has sparked a new campaign, to be launched within two weeks by the AFL Players Association.Chief executive Matt Finnis said a new message of tolerance was needed.
"We want to send a strong message that this is our players' workplace and the workplace of other officials and spectators who pay money and who should be able to play the game free of offensive behaviour." Premier Ted Baillieu last night vowed to join the fight to stamp out racism in sport.He said offenders deserved "the wrath of the community". Mr Baillieu said he wanted to meet Daw face-to-face and described the Sudanese-born 20-year-old as hero for standing up to the abusive tirade he copped while playing for North Melbourne's VFL feeder team Werribee. The Premier said he was horrified racism had again surfaced in football and had contacted Kangaroo chief executive Eugene Arocca to set up a meeting with Daw. "I despair for moments like that. I think Majak Daw is a hero and there are plenty of others heroes in similar situations," Mr Baillieu said. Melbourne coach Dean Bailey led calls for more to be done to win the war against intolerance. "They really should be naming and shaming them," Bailey said. "I think what happened to young Majak Daw is a disgrace. Here's a young man making his way in life and being a footballer and really representing his people and to have those slurs on him is just ridiculous." The rogue spectator who launched the ugly racist rant aimed at Daw has been ordered to send him a letter of apology. The man, who has not been identified, will also have to attend a racial and religious vilification program before he can attend a VFL match. The punishment was dished out in a combined crackdown between AFL Victoria and police.
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Majak Daw Racially Vilified At VFL Game

Majak Daw Racially Vilified At VFL Game | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
The condemnation that erupted after Sudanese footballer Majak Daw was racially vilified in a VFL game at the weekend makes it difficult to imagine that up until a decade ago, we tolerated racist abuse against indigenous AFL players. How disappointing that it took indigenous players such as Michael Long and Nicky Winmar, rather than their white fella teammates, to open the curtain on the racist minefield of AFL football. However, as the indignation rolls on and the calls to name and shame the offender are plastered across the tabloid press, a moment's reflection wouldn't go astray. Maybe this incident throws some light on the broader context of racist abuse at the football and the wider community. Only recently Australian soldiers in Afghanistan were accused of racist behaviour towards the Muslims they are supposed to be protecting from the Taliban. Racism has always been a factor in Australian history, from the taking of indigenous land and forced removal of Aboriginal children to the depiction of our enemies in various wars as sub-human and the demonising of asylum seekers. If we are to name the person responsible for the racist abuse at the football in Port Melbourne on Saturday, then why stop there? Why not name everyone we believe to be engaged in racism or the perpetration of myths upon which racism is built? Travel to Melbourne's northern suburbs and you'll find no shortage of Muslims who believe articles in the tabloid press regularly vilify them. And what are we to make of a program, funded by the federal government, directed at Muslim boys to stop them associating with supposed would-be terrorists? Hume Council, in Melbourne's northern suburbs, is launching a project under the charming banner, Hume Anti-Violent Extremist Youth. Has the federal government considered the potential implications of a program founded on the premise that Muslim teenagers are potential terrorist? Only two years ago, Lebanese Muslim boys in my under-16 West Coburg football team were vilified as "gorillas, smelly Arabs and terrorists". The Hume Council program could be held up as evidence that these views are acceptable. And more recently, I asked the AFL why a report into an incident at an Essendon District Football League under-16 game found that: "It is apparent to me that West Coburg has issues with some of its younger players and supporters . . . (and) . . . It is significant that almost all of the West Coburg players or supporters involved have a middle eastern background". Such racial profiling is totally inappropriate. To date, the AFL has not publicly commented on the appropriateness of the racial profiling in the EDFL report. This is in stark contrast with the organisation's immediate condemnation of the abuse of Majak Daw. Middle Eastern boys might not be as distinctive as the Sudanese Majak Daw, but they are discernible enough by colour and political context to be easily marginalised. Instead of individualising cases of racism, the AFL should be identifying its generalised characteristics, including the attitudes and myths that give comfort to it. As long as the AFL ignores racism at work in the broader social context, including at the grassroots level of the sport, it is open to the accusation that it's merely protecting its brand rather than genuinely trying to tackle the problem.
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Anti-racists shut down Australian Defence League (Melbourne)

Anti-racists shut down Australian Defence League (Melbourne) | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
Muslim groups are worried by a new nationalist organisation that claims Australia is in danger of being Islamicised. Australian Defence League supporters clashed with Left-wing protesters in the city yesterday as the group held its first local rally, sparking a warning from the Baillieu Government that bigotry would not be tolerated. A small team of police initially kept the groups apart, but ADL supporters were forced to end their protest early when activists encircled them and tore up placards. The ADL is an offshoot of the English Defence League, which has staged demonstrations in areas of high Muslim concentration in the UK. About 40 ADL members, including women dressed in mock hijabs, protested in Federation Square yesterday over issues such as the certification of halal meat and concern sharia law would be introduced. Protest organiser Martin Brennan claimed the group had 1400 members but denied it was anti-Muslim. "We are not racist whatsoever, we are against radical Islam infiltrating Australia," he said. Australian Federation of Islamic Councils president Ikebal Patel said the group was provocative and wrong to believe that most Australian Muslims wanted to bring in sharia law. "It's of great concern that anyone is out there trying to disrupt the peaceful social fabric of Australia," he said. Islamic Council of Victoria spokesman Nazeem Hussein said the ADL's views were uninformed and saddening. State Multicultural Affairs Minister Nick Kotsiras said the Government did not tolerate racism, bigotry or the incitement of hatred. "Activities which undermine the multicultural harmony of Victoria will be dealt with swiftly," he said. The ADL protest was swamped by the much bigger group of activists and unionists who shouted anti-racism slogans. Anti-racism protester Mick Armstrong, from Socialist Alternative, said the ADL was trying to copy the tactics of its British counterpart. "They have had their protest and we have ended it," he said.
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Rally to oppose far right racism (NZ)

Rally to oppose far right racism (NZ) | anti-racism framework | Scoop.it
Organisers of two anti-racism marches have agreed to come together next week for one "massive counter-rally" against a far-right group.Thousands have indicated on the organisers' Facebook site that they will take part in the rally in central Auckland on May 27, and the event is also fuelling a high level of interest on some Chinese online forums. The Right Wing Resistance is distributing flyers in Auckland, Christchurch and New Plymouth claiming an Asian invasion is taking place. Leader Kyle Chapman said the group was against Asian immigration because Asians "stole jobs" and "destroyed white New Zealand culture and heritage". Susan Zhu, a local Chinese community leader who is promoting the protest, said, "Our rally is to say that this city does not tolerate racism. "We just want people from different cultures to be celebrating New Zealand as one harmonious, multicultural country where diversity is welcomed." The rally at 11am on Friday week in Aotea Square would include speeches and Asian cultural performances, she said.The Right Wing Resistance has said on its website it will not be marching in Auckland, but is planning for "activism in Auckland and other cities for the [general] election". The group claims its "stop the Asian invasion" flyer campaign has been "the most successful right-wing campaign ever". "The plan to target high-income areas paid off. Man, them people love to moan and complain ... better to put a hundred flyers in rich letterboxes than 10,000 in the lower income." Meanwhile, the police will hold meetings in the coming weeks with various Asian communities in Auckland to reassure them that they do not have to fear the right-wing "radicals". "We shouldn't live in fear," said Superintendent Wally Haumaha, head of Maori, Pacific and ethnic services, "and we shouldn't sit back and think these people are going to inflict harm, because the moment they even consider stepping towards that, the police will take a hard line and ensure that any breaches of the law will be dealt with in an appropriate way. "It's well known that the Right Wing Resistance are a small group who do tend to make noises from time to time. "But I would think that most well-intentioned people in this country would not take too much notice or cognisance of what is being said by these radicals."
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