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How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today

How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it

 

 By Jim Taylor, Ph. D.

 

"There is...a growing body of research that technology can be both beneficial and harmful to different ways in which children think. Moreover, this influence isn’t just affecting children on the surface of their thinking. Rather, because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops. For example, as the technology writer Nicholas Carr has observed, the emergence of reading encouraged our brains to be focused and imaginative. In contrast, the rise of the Internet is strengthening our ability to scan information rapidly and efficiently.

 

"The effects of technology on children are complicated, with both benefits and costs. Whether technology helps or hurts in the development of your children’s thinking depends on what specific technology is used and how and what frequency it is used. At least early in their lives, the power to dictate your children’s relationship with technology and, as a result, its influence on them, from synaptic activity to conscious thought.

 

"Over the next several weeks, I’m going to focus on the areas in which the latest thinking and research has shown technology to have the greatest influence on how children think: attention, information overload, decision making, and memory/learning. Importantly, all of these areas are ones in which you can have a counteracting influence on how technology affects your children."


Via Deborah McNelis, Terry Doherty, Meryl Jaffe, PhD, Jim Lerman, Lynnette Van Dyke, Gust MEES, Tom Perran
Sue Tamani's insight:

I can feel online technology changing the way I think!


It must surely be doing something to developing brains.

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Linda Buckmaster's comment, December 17, 2012 2:44 PM
Thanks for the rescoop.
Jim Siders's curator insight, March 20, 2013 9:06 AM

to tech or not to tech........that is the question. Not just a casual question if this report is accurate.

sarah's curator insight, May 30, 2013 11:04 PM

Très intéressant.

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discoveries based on the scientific method
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Juan Enriquez: Will our kids be a different species? | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Throughout human evolution, multiple versions of humans co-existed. Could we be mid-upgrade now?
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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, July 1, 2012 11:39 PM
Thanks. Great video
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Researchers, Startups Hope One Drop of Blood Could Diagnose All Types of Cancer

Researchers, Startups Hope One Drop of Blood Could Diagnose All Types of Cancer | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it

As genetics reveals the incredible diversity among cancer cells, researchers have largely given up pursuing a silver bullet to cure all types of cancer. Instead, many have begun searching for the next-best thing: a silver bullet test to diagnose all cancers. The test would look for markers of cancer in the patient’s blood, where the process of tumor-making leaves a trail that can often be picked up before tumors are big enough to spot.

 

And early diagnosis makes a big difference in survival rates. When cancer is found in Stage 0, as it’s just getting started, or in Stage 1, it kills only 10 percent of patients, regardless of what type of cancer it is, for the most part. Many of the cancers we know as the deadliest are so known because they are rarely found in earlier stages.

 

 


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amazing research here

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6 Wild Quotes From Christopher Hitchens That Will Remind You Why You're An Atheist

6 Wild Quotes From Christopher Hitchens That Will Remind You Why You're An Atheist | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Hitch may have passed on, but his words still ring loud and clear.
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Tony Abbott incorrect on the history of marriage

Tony Abbott incorrect on the history of marriage | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Prime Minister Tony Abbott says marriage has always been between a man and a woman, but that's not the case.

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add your insight...

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Infographic: Article Summary Writing Tips

How and Why to add an Article Summary to each Post.Have a look next time you do a search. In addition to seeing the heading, you can also see a few sentences about what is next.This is where you can expand on the heading by giving reasons why people should read on, by enticing readers with some juicy anticipation of what is to come.Can
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Parkwood Golf Club

Parkwood Golf Club - revampedMy husband started playing golf in 2003 when we were living in Fiji for 12 months.When we returned to Australia in October 2004, he joined the Parkwood International Golf Club, not far from where we lived.Over an area of 26 km Gold Coast coastline, there are more than 50 golf clubs of varying length, standard
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A ‘universal smart window’ for instant control of lighting and heat | KurzweilAI

A ‘universal smart window’ for instant control of lighting and heat | KurzweilAI | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Smart-window glass that can be switched to block heat or light (credit: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Researchers at the U.S. Department of
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Researchers track facial expressions to improve teaching software | KurzweilAI

Researchers track facial expressions to improve teaching software | KurzweilAI | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Student workstation with depth camera, skin conductance bracelet, and computer with webcam (credit: Joseph F. Grafsgaard et al.) Research from North
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Potential new target to thwart antibiotic resistance: Viruses in gut confer antibiotic resistance to bacteria

Potential new target to thwart antibiotic resistance: Viruses in gut confer antibiotic resistance to bacteria | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Bacteria in the gut that are under attack by antibiotics have allies no one had anticipated, scientists have found.
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Islam and the Misuses of Ecstasy : Sam Harris

Islam and the Misuses of Ecstasy : Sam Harris | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Sam Harris, neuroscientist and author of the New York Times bestsellers, The End of Faith, Letter to a Christian Nation, and The Moral Landscape.
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Man gets 3D-printed face

Man gets 3D-printed face | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
When restaurant manager Eric Moger surprised his girlfriend by proposing over Christmas dinner, he could have no idea that less than a year later his life and appearance would be changed beyond recognition.
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Response to Controversy : Sam Harris

Response to Controversy : Sam Harris | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Sam Harris, neuroscientist and author of the New York Times bestsellers, The End of Faith, Letter to a Christian Nation, and The Moral Landscape.
Sue Tamani's insight:

He analyses with such clarity.

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Big Tobacco losing ground on plain packs but homing in on world's poor

Big Tobacco losing ground on plain packs but homing in on world's poor | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Plain packing has been a reality for Big Tobacco in Australia for three months now; New Zealand announced last week it will follow suit; and at least four other nations, including India, are also considering…...
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bastards

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Replacing a defective gene with a correct sequence to treat genetic disorders | KurzweilAI

Replacing a defective gene with a correct sequence to treat genetic disorders | KurzweilAI | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
(Credit: Christine Daniloff/MIT) Using a new gene-editing system based on bacterial proteins, MIT researchers have cured mice of a rare liver disorder
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Just amazing!

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Multivitamin and mineral use and breast cancer mortality in older women with invasive breast cancer in the women’s health initiative - Springer

Multivitamin and mineral use and breast cancer mortality in older women with invasive breast cancer in the women’s health initiative - Springer | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it

Postmenopausal women with invasive breast cancer using MVM (multi-vitamins with minerals) had lower breast cancer mortality than non-users. The results suggest a possible role for daily MVM use in attenuating breast cancer mortality in women with invasive breast cancer but the findings require confirmation.


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Sue Tamani's insight:

I love anything from Ray and Terry - they are in the forefront of anti aging research.

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Bees use 'biological autopilot' to land › News in Science (ABC Science)

Bees use 'biological autopilot' to land › News in Science (ABC Science) | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Bees get a perfect touchdown by detecting how fast their landing site 'zooms in' as they approach, new research has found.
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Rise and Shine: 5 Things Uber Successful People Do First Thing

Rise and Shine! Morning time simply became your new best buddy.Love it or despise it, making use of the morning hours prior to work may be the secret to a successful, and healthy, lifestyle. That's right, early rising is a typical quality discovered in numerous CEOs, government officials, and other influential individuals who have the rise and
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Content Marketing the New SEO – Infographic

Another great Content Marketing infographic from Berrie Pelser of Wordpress Hosting SEO.More and more today, business uses great content marketing to attract more readers, shares and likes.Makes sense really.Good content marketing works better in the long term, instead of unreliable black hat SEO which can often be affected by changes
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The Most Astounding Fact – Neil deGrasse Tyson

The Most Astounding Fact – Neil deGrasse Tyson | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it

Time magazine once asked astropysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson 10 questions.

One of those questions asked by a Time reader was “What is the most astounding fact you can share with us about the Universe?”

Neil’s response is very awe-inspiring, especially when brought to life in this video which is a compilation from various sources by Max Schlickenmeyer.

Our knowledge of the universe and where we come from is known more today than at any time in history.

Sue Tamani's insight:

I get goosebumps whenever I watch this video!

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Any Day Now, Malaria, TB and AIDS will be Dodos.

Any Day Now, Malaria, TB and AIDS will be Dodos.
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Watch the inspiring video and then contact your local member to spread the word.

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BigBrain: an ultra-high-resolution 3D roadmap of the human brain | KurzweilAI

BigBrain: an ultra-high-resolution 3D roadmap of the human brain | KurzweilAI | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
BigBrain (credit: Montreal Neurological Institute and Forschungszentrum Jülich) A landmark three-dimensional (3-D) digital reconstruction of a complete
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Unfrozen mystery: Water reveals a new secret

Unfrozen mystery: Water reveals a new secret | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Using revolutionary new techniques, a team led by Carnegie's Malcolm Guthrie has made a striking discovery about how ice behaves under pressure, changing ideas that date back almost 50 years.
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Using Thorium for Energy

Using Thorium for Energy

Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactors LFTRs were invented 50 years ago by an American named Alvin Weinberg.

LFTRs are revolutionary liquid reactors that run not on uranium, but thorium. These work and have been built before.

The main reason this technology is not in widespread use today is our irrational fear of nuclear energy, despite the fact that more people have died from fossil fuels and even hydroelectric power than nuclear power.

That plus the multinational companies and governments invested in fossil fuel use such as oil, coal and gas.

How much Thorium for Energy do we Have?

Latest research says we have at least 2.6 million tonnes of it on earth, distributed over all the continents.

For every kilogram of thorium, LFTRs can produce 3.5 million Kwh of energy.

This is 70 times greater than uranium and 10,000 times greater than oil.

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Huge online attack exposes internet's vulnerability - tech - 29 March 2013 - New Scientist

Huge online attack exposes internet's vulnerability - tech - 29 March 2013 - New Scientist | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
The largest online attack ever reported – which may have slowed down the internet itself – is over, but the next battleground is already
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China’s next-generation Internet is a world-beater | KurzweilAI

China’s next-generation Internet is a world-beater | KurzweilAI | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Artist rendering of city-sized cloud computing and office complex being built in China (IBM) An open-access report published in the Philosophical
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can't wait for it!

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The self: The one and only you - 20 February 2013 - New Scientist

The self: The one and only you - 20 February 2013 - New Scientist | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
The self: The one and only you20 February 2013 by Jan WesterhoffMagazine issue 2905. Subscribe and saveFor similar stories, visit the The Human Brain Topic Guide

Video: Flashing creates illusion of motion

There are flaws in our intuitive beliefs about what makes us who we are. Who are we really?

Read more: "The great illusion of the self"

THERE appear to be few things more certain to us than the existence of our selves. We might be sceptical about the existence of the worldaround us, but how could we be in doubt about the existence of us? Isn't doubt made impossible by the fact that there is somebody who is doubting something? Who, if not us, would this somebody be?

While it seems irrefutable that we must exist in some sense, things get a lot more puzzling once we try to get a better grip of what having a self actually amounts to.

Three beliefs about the self are absolutely fundamental for our belief of who we are. First, we regard ourselves as unchanging and continuous. This is not to say that we remain forever the same, but that among all this change there is something that remains constant and that makes the "me" today the same person I was five years ago and will be five years in the future.

Second, we see our self as the unifier that brings it all together. The world presents itself to us as a cacophony of sights, sounds, smells, mental images, recollections and so forth. In the self, these are all integrated and an image of a single, unified world emerges.

Finally, the self is an agent. It is the thinker of our thoughts and the doer of our deeds. It is where the representation of the world, unified into one coherent whole, is used so we can act on this world.

All of these beliefs appear to be blindingly obvious and as certain as can be. But as we look at them more closely, they become less and less self-evident.

It would seem obvious that we exist continuously from our first moments in our mother's womb up to our death. Yet during the time that our self exists, it undergoes substantial changes in beliefs, abilities, desires and moods. The happy self of yesterday cannot be exactly the same as the grief-stricken self of today, for example. But we surely still have the same self today that we had yesterday.

There are two different models of the self we can use to explore this issue: a string of pearls and a rope. According to the first model, our self is something constant that has all the changing properties but remains itself unchanged. Like a thread running through every pearl on a string, our self runs through every single moment of our lives, providing a core and a unity for them. The difficulty with this view of the self is that it cannot be most of the things we usually think define us. Being happy or sad, being able to speak Chinese, preferring cherries to strawberries, even being conscious – all these are changeable states, the disappearance of which should not affect the self, as a disappearance of individual pearls should not affect the thread. But it then becomes unclear why such a minimal self should have the central status in our lives that we usually accord to it.

The second model is based on the fact that a rope holds together even though there is no single fibre running through the entire rope, just a sequence of overlapping shorter fibres. Similarly, our self might just be the continuity of overlapping mental events. While this view has a certain plausibility, it has problems of its own. We usually assume that when we think of something or make a decision, it is the whole of us doing it, not just some specific part. Yet, according to the rope view, our self is never completely present at any point, just like a rope's threads do not run its entire length.

It seems then as if we are left with the unattractive choice between a continuous self so far removed from everything constituting us that its absence would scarcely be noticeable, and a self that actually consists of components of our mental life, but contains no constant part we could identify with. The empirical evidence we have so far points towards the rope view, but it is by no means settled.

Even more important, and just as troublesome, is our second core belief about the self: that it is where it all comes together.

It is easy to overlook the significance of this fact, but the brain accomplishes an extremely complex task in bringing about the appearance of a unified world. Consider, for example, that light travels much faster than sound yet visual stimuli take longer to process than noises. Putting together these different speeds means that sights and sounds from an event usually become available to our consciousness at different times (only sights and sounds from events about 10 metres away are available at the same time). That means the apparent simultaneity of hearing a voice and seeing the speaker's lips move, for example, has to be constructed by the brain.

Our intuitive view of the result of this process resembles a theatre. Like a spectator seated in front of a stage, the self perceives a unified world put together from a diverse range of sensory data. It would get confusing if these had not been unified in advance, just as a theatregoer would be confused if they heard an actor's lines before he was on stage. While this view is persuasive, it faces many difficulties.

Consider a simple case, the "beta phenomenon" (see diagram and video above). If a bright spot is flashed onto the corner of a screen and is immediately followed by a similar spot in the opposite corner, it can appear as if there was a dot moving diagonally across the screen. This is easily explained: the brain often fills in elements of a scene using guesswork. But a tweak to this experiment produces a curious effect.

If the spots are different colours – for example a red spot followed by a green spot – observers see a moving spot that changes colour abruptly around the mid-point of the diagonal (see "Spotted trick"). This is very peculiar. If the brain is filling in the missing positions along the diagonal for the benefit of the self in the theatre, how does it know before the green spot has been observed that the colour will switch?

One way of explaining the beta phenomenon is by assuming that our experience is played out in the theatre with a small time delay. The brain doesn't pass on the information about the spots as soon as it can, but holds it back for a little while. Once the green spot has been processed, both spots are put together into a perceptual narrative that involves one moving spot changing colour. This edited version is then screened in the theatre of consciousness.

Unfortunately, this explanation does not fit in well with evidence of how perception works. Conscious responses to visual stimuli can occur at a speed very close to the minimum time physically possible. If we add up the time it takes for information to reach the brain and then be processed, there is not enough time left for a delay of sufficient length to explain the beta phenomenon.

Perhaps there is something wrong with the notion of a self perceiving a unified stream of sensory information. Perhaps there are just various neurological processes taking place in the brain and various mental processes taking place in our mind, without some central agency where it all comes together at a particular moment, the perceptual "now" (see "The self: You think you live in the present?"). It is much easier to make sense of the beta phenomenon if there is no specific time when perceptual content appears in the theatre of the self – because there is no such theatre.

The perception of a red spot turning green arises in the brain only afterthe perception of the green spot. Our mistaken perception of the real flow of events is akin to the way we interpret the following sentence: "The man ran out of the house, after he had kissed his wife". The sequence in which the information comes in on the page is "running–kissing", but the sequence of events you construct and understand is "kissing–running". For us to experience events as happening in a specific order, it is not necessary that information about these events enters our brain in that same order.

The final core belief is that the self is the locus of control. Yet cognitive science has shown in numerous cases that our mind can conjure, post hoc, an intention for an action that was not brought about by us.

In one experiment, a volunteer was asked to move a cursor slowly around a screen on which 50 small objects were displayed, and asked to stop the cursor on an object every 30 seconds or so.

Self-delusion

The computer mouse controlling the cursor was shared, ouija-board style, with another volunteer. Via headphones, the first volunteer would hear words, some of which related to the objects on screen. What this volunteer did not know was that their partner was one of the researchers who would occasionally force the cursor towards a picture without the volunteer noticing.

If the cursor was forced to the image of a rose, and the volunteer had heard the word "rose" a few seconds before, they reported feeling that they had intentionally moved the mouse there. The reasons why these cues combined to produce this effect is not what is interesting here: more important is that it reveals one way that the brain does not always display its actual operations to us. Instead, it produces a post-hoc "I did this" narrative despite lacking any factual basis for it (American Psychologist, vol 54, p 480).

So, many of our core beliefs about ourselves do not withstand scrutiny. This presents a tremendous challenge for our everyday view of ourselves, as it suggests that in a very fundamental sense we are not real. Instead, our self is comparable to an illusion – but without anybody there that experiences the illusion.

Yet we may have no choice but to endorse these mistaken beliefs. Our whole way of living relies on the notion that we are unchanging, coherent and autonomous individuals. The self is not only a useful illusion, it may also be a necessary one.

This article appeared in print under the headline "What are you?"

I am the one and only

Think back to your earliest memory. Now project forward to the day of your death. It is impossible to know when this will come, but it will.

What you have just surveyed might be called your "self-span", or the time when this entity you call your self exists. Either side of that, zilch.

Which is very mysterious, and a little unsettling. Modern humans have existed for perhaps 100,000 years, and more than 100 billion have already lived and died. We assume that they all experienced a sense of self similar to yours. None of these selves has made a comeback, and as far as we know, neither will you.

What is it about a mere arrangement of matter and energy that gives rise to a subjective sense of self? It must be a collective property of the neurons in your brain, which have mostly stayed with you throughout life, and which will cease to exist after you die. But why a given bundle of neurons can give rise to a given sense of selfhood, and whether that subjective sense can ever reside in a different bundle of neurons, may forever remain a mystery.

Graham Lawton

Jan Westerhoff is a philosopher at the University of Durham, UK, and the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies, and author of Reality: A very short introduction (Oxford University Press, 2011)

Sue Tamani's insight:

Mind blowing, especially last paragraph.

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