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Google simulates brain networks to recognize speech and images | KurzweilAI

Google simulates brain networks to recognize speech and images | KurzweilAI | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it

We consider the problem of building high-level, class-specific feature detectors from only unlabeled data. For example, is it possible to learn a face detector using only unlabeled images? Credit: Google Research)

This summer Google set a new landmark in the field of artificial intelligence with software that learned how to recognize cats, people, and other things simply by watching YouTube videos (see “Self-Taught Software“).

That technology, modeled on how brain cells operate, is now being put to work making Google’s products smarter, with speech recognition being the first service to benefit, Technology Review reports.

Google’s learning software is based on simulating groups of connected brain cells that communicate and influence one another. When such a neural network, as it’s called, is exposed to data, the relationships between different neurons can change. That causes the network to develop the ability to react in certain ways to incoming data of a particular kind — and the network is said to have learned something.

Neural networks have been used for decades in areas where machine learning is applied, such as chess-playing software or face detection. Google’s engineers have found ways to put more computing power behind the approach than was previously possible, creating neural networks that can learn without human assistance and are robust enough to be used commercially, not just as research demonstrations.

The company’s neural networks decide for themselves which features of data to pay attention to, and which patterns matter, rather than having humans decide that, say, colors and particular shapes are of interest to software trying to identify objects.

Google is now using these neural networks to recognize speech more accurately, a technology increasingly important to Google’s smartphone operating system, Android, as well as the search app it makes available for Apple devices (see “Google’s Answer to Siri Thinks Ahead“). “We got between 20 and 25 percent improvement in terms of words that are wrong,” says Vincent Vanhoucke, a leader of Google’s speech-recognition efforts. “That means that many more people will have a perfect experience without errors.” The neural net is so far only working on U.S. English, and Vanhoucke says similar improvements should be possible when it is introduced for other dialects and languages.

Other Google products will likely improve over time with help from the new learning software. The company’s image search tools, for example, could become better able to understand what’s in a photo without relying on surrounding text. And Google’s self-driving cars (see “Look, No Hands“) and mobile computer built into a pair of glasses (see “You Will Want Google’s Goggles“) could benefit from software better able to make sense of more real-world data.

The new technology grabbed headlines back in June of this year, when Google engineers published results of an experiment that threw 10 million images grabbed from YouTube videos at their simulated brain cells, running 16,000 processors across a thousand computers for 10 days without pause.

“Most people keep their model in a single machine, but we wanted to experiment with very large neural networks,” says Jeff Dean, an engineer helping lead the research at Google. “If you scale up both the size of the model and the amount of data you train it with, you can learn finer distinctions or more complex features.”

The neural networks that come out of that process are more flexible. “These models can typically take a lot more context,” says Dean, giving an example from the world of speech recognition. If, for example, Google’s system thought it heard someone say “I’m going to eat a lychee,” but the last word was slightly muffled, it could confirm its hunch based on past experience of phrases because “lychee” is a fruit and is used in the same context as “apple” or “orange.”

Dean says his team is also testing models that understand both images and text together. “You give it ‘porpoise’ and it gives you pictures of porpoises,” he says. “If you give it a picture of a porpoise, it gives you ‘porpoise’ as a word.”

A next step could be to have the same model learn the sounds of words as well. Being able to relate different forms of data like that could lead to speech recognition that gathers extra clues from video, for example, and it could boost the capabilities of Google’s self-driving cars by helping them understand their surroundings by combining the many streams of data they collect, from laser scans of nearby obstacles to information from the car’s engine.

Google’s work on making neural networks brings us a small step closer to one of the ultimate goals of AI — creating software that can match animal or perhaps even human intelligence, says Yoshua Bengio, a professor at the University of Montreal who works on similar machine-learning techniques. “This is the route toward making more general artificial intelligence — there’s no way you will get an intelligent machine if it can’t take in a large volume of knowledge about the world,” he says.

In fact, the workings of Google’s neural networks operate in similar ways to what neuroscientists know about the visual cortex in mammals, the part of the brain that processes visual information, says Bengio. “It turns out that the feature learning networks being used [by Google] are similar to the methods used by the brain that are able to discover objects that exist.”

However, he is quick to add that even Google’s neural networks are much smaller than the brain, and that they can’t perform many things necessary to intelligence, such as reasoning with information collected from the outside world.

Dean is also careful not to imply that the limited intelligences he’s building are close to matching any biological brain. But he can’t resist pointing out that if you pick the right contest, Google’s neural networks have humans beat.

“We are seeing better than human-level performance in some visual tasks,” he says, giving the example of labeling, where house numbers appear in photos taken by Google’s Street View car, a job that used to be farmed out to many humans.

“They’re starting to use neural nets to decide whether a patch [in an image] is a house number or not,” says Dean, and they turn out to perform better than humans. It’s a small victory — but one that highlights how far artificial neural nets are behind the ones in your head. “It’s probably that it’s not very exciting, and a computer never gets tired,” says Dean. It takes real intelligence to get bored.

RELATED:
Using large-scale brain simulations for machine learning and AI
Google’s answer to Siri thinks ahead
Topics: AI/Robotics | Innovation/Entrepreneurship | Internet/Telecom

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Juan Enriquez: Will our kids be a different species? | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Throughout human evolution, multiple versions of humans co-existed. Could we be mid-upgrade now?
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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, July 2, 2012 2:39 AM
Thanks. Great video
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Homepage

National Science Week is an annual celebration of science in Australia, an opportunity to join together to enjoy and explore the wonders and benefits of science.
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So much to see and do!

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‘Hyperbolic metamaterials’ closer to reality | KurzweilAI

‘Hyperbolic metamaterials’ closer to reality | KurzweilAI | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Hyperbolic metamaterials could bring optical advances including powerful microscopes, quantum computers and high-performance solar cells. The graphic at left
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Means so much - we will be able to "see" more.

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Researchers, Startups Hope One Drop of Blood Could Diagnose All Types of Cancer

Researchers, Startups Hope One Drop of Blood Could Diagnose All Types of Cancer | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it

As genetics reveals the incredible diversity among cancer cells, researchers have largely given up pursuing a silver bullet to cure all types of cancer. Instead, many have begun searching for the next-best thing: a silver bullet test to diagnose all cancers. The test would look for markers of cancer in the patient’s blood, where the process of tumor-making leaves a trail that can often be picked up before tumors are big enough to spot.

 

And early diagnosis makes a big difference in survival rates. When cancer is found in Stage 0, as it’s just getting started, or in Stage 1, it kills only 10 percent of patients, regardless of what type of cancer it is, for the most part. Many of the cancers we know as the deadliest are so known because they are rarely found in earlier stages.

 

 


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amazing research here

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6 Wild Quotes From Christopher Hitchens That Will Remind You Why You're An Atheist

6 Wild Quotes From Christopher Hitchens That Will Remind You Why You're An Atheist | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Hitch may have passed on, but his words still ring loud and clear.
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Tony Abbott incorrect on the history of marriage

Tony Abbott incorrect on the history of marriage | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Prime Minister Tony Abbott says marriage has always been between a man and a woman, but that's not the case.

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add your insight...

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Infographic: Article Summary Writing Tips

How and Why to add an Article Summary to each Post.Have a look next time you do a search. In addition to seeing the heading, you can also see a few sentences about what is next.This is where you can expand on the heading by giving reasons why people should read on, by enticing readers with some juicy anticipation of what is to come.Can
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Parkwood Golf Club

Parkwood Golf Club - revampedMy husband started playing golf in 2003 when we were living in Fiji for 12 months.When we returned to Australia in October 2004, he joined the Parkwood International Golf Club, not far from where we lived.Over an area of 26 km Gold Coast coastline, there are more than 50 golf clubs of varying length, standard
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A ‘universal smart window’ for instant control of lighting and heat | KurzweilAI

A ‘universal smart window’ for instant control of lighting and heat | KurzweilAI | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Smart-window glass that can be switched to block heat or light (credit: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Researchers at the U.S. Department of
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Researchers track facial expressions to improve teaching software | KurzweilAI

Researchers track facial expressions to improve teaching software | KurzweilAI | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Student workstation with depth camera, skin conductance bracelet, and computer with webcam (credit: Joseph F. Grafsgaard et al.) Research from North
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Potential new target to thwart antibiotic resistance: Viruses in gut confer antibiotic resistance to bacteria

Potential new target to thwart antibiotic resistance: Viruses in gut confer antibiotic resistance to bacteria | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Bacteria in the gut that are under attack by antibiotics have allies no one had anticipated, scientists have found.
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Islam and the Misuses of Ecstasy : Sam Harris

Islam and the Misuses of Ecstasy : Sam Harris | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Sam Harris, neuroscientist and author of the New York Times bestsellers, The End of Faith, Letter to a Christian Nation, and The Moral Landscape.
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Man gets 3D-printed face

Man gets 3D-printed face | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
When restaurant manager Eric Moger surprised his girlfriend by proposing over Christmas dinner, he could have no idea that less than a year later his life and appearance would be changed beyond recognition.
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G20: Australians bury heads in sand to mock government climate stance - The Guardian

G20: Australians bury heads in sand to mock government climate stance - The Guardian | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Bondi Beach protest highlights Abbott administration’s perceived failure to put climate change on G20 summit agenda
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Those protesters wearing red swimmers are mocking our climate change denier PM Tony Abbott who often wears such 'budgie smugglers' when swimming or riding bikes in public.

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Who is Narendra Modi - India's New Prime Minister?

Who is Narendra Modi - India's New Prime Minister? | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Who is Narendra Modi?

India's election, which was won convincingly by the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), revolved around only one male: India's next head of sta
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An interesting man

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Replacing a defective gene with a correct sequence to treat genetic disorders | KurzweilAI

Replacing a defective gene with a correct sequence to treat genetic disorders | KurzweilAI | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
(Credit: Christine Daniloff/MIT) Using a new gene-editing system based on bacterial proteins, MIT researchers have cured mice of a rare liver disorder
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Just amazing!

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Multivitamin and mineral use and breast cancer mortality in older women with invasive breast cancer in the women’s health initiative - Springer

Multivitamin and mineral use and breast cancer mortality in older women with invasive breast cancer in the women’s health initiative - Springer | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it

Postmenopausal women with invasive breast cancer using MVM (multi-vitamins with minerals) had lower breast cancer mortality than non-users. The results suggest a possible role for daily MVM use in attenuating breast cancer mortality in women with invasive breast cancer but the findings require confirmation.


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I love anything from Ray and Terry - they are in the forefront of anti aging research.

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Bees use 'biological autopilot' to land › News in Science (ABC Science)

Bees use 'biological autopilot' to land › News in Science (ABC Science) | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Bees get a perfect touchdown by detecting how fast their landing site 'zooms in' as they approach, new research has found.
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Rise and Shine: 5 Things Uber Successful People Do First Thing

Rise and Shine! Morning time simply became your new best buddy.Love it or despise it, making use of the morning hours prior to work may be the secret to a successful, and healthy, lifestyle. That's right, early rising is a typical quality discovered in numerous CEOs, government officials, and other influential individuals who have the rise and
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Content Marketing the New SEO – Infographic

Another great Content Marketing infographic from Berrie Pelser of Wordpress Hosting SEO.More and more today, business uses great content marketing to attract more readers, shares and likes.Makes sense really.Good content marketing works better in the long term, instead of unreliable black hat SEO which can often be affected by changes
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The Most Astounding Fact – Neil deGrasse Tyson

The Most Astounding Fact – Neil deGrasse Tyson | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it

Time magazine once asked astropysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson 10 questions.

One of those questions asked by a Time reader was “What is the most astounding fact you can share with us about the Universe?”

Neil’s response is very awe-inspiring, especially when brought to life in this video which is a compilation from various sources by Max Schlickenmeyer.

Our knowledge of the universe and where we come from is known more today than at any time in history.

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I get goosebumps whenever I watch this video!

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Any Day Now, Malaria, TB and AIDS will be Dodos.

Any Day Now, Malaria, TB and AIDS will be Dodos.
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Watch the inspiring video and then contact your local member to spread the word.

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BigBrain: an ultra-high-resolution 3D roadmap of the human brain | KurzweilAI

BigBrain: an ultra-high-resolution 3D roadmap of the human brain | KurzweilAI | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
BigBrain (credit: Montreal Neurological Institute and Forschungszentrum Jülich) A landmark three-dimensional (3-D) digital reconstruction of a complete
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Unfrozen mystery: Water reveals a new secret

Unfrozen mystery: Water reveals a new secret | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
Using revolutionary new techniques, a team led by Carnegie's Malcolm Guthrie has made a striking discovery about how ice behaves under pressure, changing ideas that date back almost 50 years.
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Using Thorium for Energy

Using Thorium for Energy

Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactors LFTRs were invented 50 years ago by an American named Alvin Weinberg.

LFTRs are revolutionary liquid reactors that run not on uranium, but thorium. These work and have been built before.

The main reason this technology is not in widespread use today is our irrational fear of nuclear energy, despite the fact that more people have died from fossil fuels and even hydroelectric power than nuclear power.

That plus the multinational companies and governments invested in fossil fuel use such as oil, coal and gas.

How much Thorium for Energy do we Have?

Latest research says we have at least 2.6 million tonnes of it on earth, distributed over all the continents.

For every kilogram of thorium, LFTRs can produce 3.5 million Kwh of energy.

This is 70 times greater than uranium and 10,000 times greater than oil.

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Huge online attack exposes internet's vulnerability - tech - 29 March 2013 - New Scientist

Huge online attack exposes internet's vulnerability - tech - 29 March 2013 - New Scientist | anti dogmanti | Scoop.it
The largest online attack ever reported – which may have slowed down the internet itself – is over, but the next battleground is already
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