Anthropology: Critical Thinking
23 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Gabby G from Anthropology, communication & technology
Scoop.it!

Adult learning across cultures - Neuroanthropology

Adult learning across cultures - Neuroanthropology | Anthropology: Critical Thinking | Scoop.it
By Ariane Tulloch Who is educated, rich, and used to make sweeping generalizations about human behavior? Any guesses? The college aged students who make up

Via Andrea Naranjo
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gabby G
Scoop.it!

US Proposes Changes to Tribal Recognition Rules - ABC News

US Proposes Changes to Tribal Recognition Rules - ABC News | Anthropology: Critical Thinking | Scoop.it
US Proposes Changes to Tribal Recognition Rules
ABC News
"For a lot of the Plains tribes, and Indians in the country as a whole, there's oral history but not a lot of written history," Gray said.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gabby G
Scoop.it!

The first US indigenous video-game company explains how their game Never ... - Financial Post

The first US indigenous video-game company explains how their game Never ... - Financial Post | Anthropology: Critical Thinking | Scoop.it
Financial Post
The first US indigenous video-game company explains how their game Never ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gabby G
Scoop.it!

13 Mexican Indigenous Words You Didn't Know You Were Using - Huffington Post

13 Mexican Indigenous Words You Didn't Know You Were Using - Huffington Post | Anthropology: Critical Thinking | Scoop.it
13 Mexican Indigenous Words You Didn't Know You Were Using
Huffington Post
Many Americans mistakenly view Mexicans as foreign.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gabby G
Scoop.it!

Announcement of a New Journal: Medicine Anthropology Theory

Announcement of a New Journal: Medicine Anthropology Theory | Anthropology: Critical Thinking | Scoop.it
Official announcement of new OA journal "Medicine Anthropology Theory" coming on Monday. For now, check out: http://t.co/B2YXZSappz
Gabby G's insight:

Promising #openaccess medical anthropology journal, MAT, launches this summer.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gabby G
Scoop.it!

Beekeeping: Indigenous Knowledge Lost and Found — Entomology (Penn State University)

Beekeeping: Indigenous Knowledge Lost and Found — Entomology (Penn State University) | Anthropology: Critical Thinking | Scoop.it
By Elliud Muli and Maryann Frazier -- Beekeeping has been an important cultural and economic activity in Sub-Saharan Africa since time immemorial.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gabby G from Anthropology, communication & technology
Scoop.it!

anthropologyworks » Anthro in the news 3/3/14: Mapping indigenous heritage sites for human survival

anthropologyworks » Anthro in the news 3/3/14: Mapping indigenous heritage sites for human survival | Anthropology: Critical Thinking | Scoop.it

Environmental authorities have conducted heritage mapping on Gunbower Island in Australia, according to an article in The Northern Times. Cultural heritage sites located on traditionalBarapa Barapa land have been identified in a partnership involving The North Central Catchment Management Authority, Murray-Darling Basin Authority, 19 traditional land owners, an archaeologist, and an ecologist. The three week program funded by an Indigenous heritage grant included groups from Kerang, Deniliquin and Mildura. NCCMA project officer, Robyn McKay, said the purpose of the program was to gain information on watering priorities for the forest: “We need to have a knowledge of cultural and spiritual values…We want a holistic approach to environmental water and incorporate those values into water plans.” She said the program provides skills, training employment and a connection with the country: “It is great to have indigenous evolvement in water plans.”

Archaeologist Colin Pardoe is interested in the population distribution in the region: “We will update the survey records and research earth mound distributions, family to village size along the lagoons…People consider aboriginals and traditional owners to be nomads but in reality people are fairly stable and lived in villages for months at a time. From 1850, within five years they had all disappeared. We will document the reliance on recourses, nets, bags, string and bulrush which was a major food source.”


Via Andrea Naranjo
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gabby G from Anthropology, communication & technology
Scoop.it!

The Emerging Science of Computational #Anthropology | #DH #dataviz

The Emerging Science of Computational #Anthropology | #DH #dataviz | Anthropology: Critical Thinking | Scoop.it

The increasing availability of big data from mobile phones and location-based apps has triggered a revolution in the understanding of human mobility patterns. This data shows the ebb and flow of the daily commute in and out of cities, the pattern of travel around the world and even how disease can spread through cities via their transport systems.

 

So there is considerable interest in looking more closely at human mobility patterns to see just how well it can be predicted and how these predictions might be used in everything from disease control and city planning to traffic forecasting and location-based advertising.

Today we get an insight into the kind of detailed that is possible thanks to the work of Zimo Yang at Microsoft research in Beijing and a few pals. These guys start with the hypothesis that people who live in a city have a pattern of mobility that is significantly different from those who are merely visiting. By dividing travellers into locals and non-locals, their ability to predict where people are likely to visit dramatically improves.


Via Ashish Umre, luiy, Andrea Naranjo
more...
luiy's curator insight, June 10, 2014 1:49 PM

The question that Zimo and co want to answer is the following: given a particular user and their current location, where are they most likely to visit in the near future? In practice, that means analysing the user’s data, such as their hometown and the locations recently visited, and coming up with a list of other locations that they are likely to visit based on the type of people who visited these locations in the past.

Zimo and co used their training dataset to learn the mobility pattern of locals and non-locals and the popularity of the locations they visited. The team then applied this to the test dataset to see whether their algorithm was able to predict where locals and non-locals were likely to visit.

 

They found that their best results came from analysing the pattern of behaviour of a particular individual and estimating the extent to which this person behaves like a local. That produced a weighting called the indigenization coefficient that the researchers could then use to determine the mobility patterns this person was likely to follow in future.

Scooped by Gabby G
Scoop.it!

Literature Still Urgently Needs More Non-White, Non-Male Heroes - The Atlantic

Literature Still Urgently Needs More Non-White, Non-Male Heroes - The Atlantic | Anthropology: Critical Thinking | Scoop.it
Literature Still Urgently Needs More Non-White, Non-Male Heroes The Atlantic When recounting her years as a teenage hitchhiker, Veselka writes, “my survival depended on other people's ability to envision a possible future for me…[but] there was no...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gabby G
Scoop.it!

White Face review: dance exploration of Indigenous identity - The Guardian (blog)

White Face review: dance exploration of Indigenous identity - The Guardian (blog) | Anthropology: Critical Thinking | Scoop.it
The Guardian (blog) White Face review: dance exploration of Indigenous identity The Guardian (blog) Slowly, Sheppard's text shifts and this parody of perceptions of entitlement, and of choosing to identify as an Indigenous person for personal gain,...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gabby G from Peer2Politics
Scoop.it!

Indigenous Economy & Ethical Work in Ecuador - Dissertation Reviews

Indigenous Economy & Ethical Work in Ecuador - Dissertation Reviews | Anthropology: Critical Thinking | Scoop.it

Drawing on a range of personal experiences and ethnographic fieldwork conducted over a number of years, Kristine Latta’s Merchant Moralities is a detailed and sympathetic account of the moral predicaments faced by Otavalo’s indigenous comerciantes/merchants. Working with Otavaleño communities, indigenous leaders, family members and friends, Latta explores life as it unfolds in and around the town itself, in family homes in the community of Peguche, and also on travels within the United States. Through careful descriptions, we learn of the particular transformations and vulnerabilities that these entrepreneurs face, as they engage in the decidedly transnational textile and tourism industries. These transformations coincide with actions elsewhere associated with a revalorization of indigeneity – both in localised spaces and particular cultural practices, and also more broadly on the national political stage. What can the distinct moral experiences of Otavalo’s merchants tell us more broadly about the dynamics of cultural change, the recalibration of tradition, and the complexities of contemporary indigenous experience? Focusing on people’s responses to shifts in priorities and contested commitments, we see how merchants articulate their own entrepreneurial values as personalised expressions of indigeneity, and do so amidst the novel opportunities and conspicuous disparities that their livelihoods create.


Via jean lievens
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gabby G
Scoop.it!

Games can preserve indigenous stories and oral histories

Games can preserve indigenous stories and oral histories | Anthropology: Critical Thinking | Scoop.it
One way to pass along a culture's oral history is to transform them into games. Building quest-like tasks based on cultural content also gives players not native to these traditions the chance to...
Gabby G's insight:

From Polygon, by Alexa Ray Corriea (@AlexaRayC)

"....reflect on them, according to independent game designer Elizabeth LaPensee.

 

LaPensee makes "indigenously-determined games," which are developed in collaboration with cultural groups and designed to have a social impact. LaPensee has worked on board games and other non-digital space games as well as touch screen titles that cope with historical trauma.

 

Speaking in a panel at GDC today, LaPensee discussed Survivance, a game she made alongside Oregon-based non-profit company Wisdom of the Elders. Wisdom of the Elders is an organization dedicated to preserving arts, environmental science and other pieces of oral history in the west coast Native American tradition. In Survivance, players "listen to, reflect on, and create stories in any medium" based on indigenous stories within their cultural tradition. The game sets players on quests that ask them to reflect on the stories they are working through, which are non-linear affairs inspired by tales from Native American elders and storytellers.

In indigenous storytelling, there is a reciprocal relationship between the storyteller and the listeners at all times, LaPensee said.

 

Storytellers guide listeners through the experience. Players, through engagement, also build out the experience by completing it. In Survivance, storytellers and elders guide the player with quests built on their stories. Indigenous stories are also non-linear. Survivance players complete and continuously revisit these "stories with stories," digging deeper into the game and learning different lessons at each stage.

 

Through this questing, players eventually become storytellers themselves. As new storytellers, at the end of the quests players create an "act of survivance," a moment of reflection that can take any artistic form — short stories, animations and other forms of art.

"Indigenous storytelling is sometimes misconstrued to have morals — this comes out of adjustments that come out of western storytelling over time," LaPensee said. "Traditionally, all stories are ongoing. They can last a few minutes, hours, a whole night, days, months, years — there is revisiting that happens.

 

"As you grow you are given access by storytellers to more layers — 'add-on content' if you will — as you go along," she added. "As we grow as human beings and as we experience our own life lessons, our eyes are closed but our ears are open to more teachings that reveal themselves. The storyteller is always telling the same story, we're just able to access more teachings from it."

 

Image SourceWisdom of the Elders
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gabby G
Scoop.it!

DIGITAL ANTHROPOLOGY/ HEATHER HORST AND DANIEL MILLER

Review of Digital Anthropology, ed. Horst and Miller. Reviewed by Mona Abdel-Fadil.

"(...)this is not a handbook of digital anthropology, i.e. it is not a guide on how to do digital anthropology. Instead, the various chapters provide somewhat of an epistemological exploration of the concept of ‘digital anthropology’, with reference to a handful of digital ethnographies from around the globe. I am quite certain that aspiring digital anthropologists would benefit from attempting to engage with Horst and Miller’s six principles. I believe these six principles can be further developed, empirically studied and theorized in future anthropological studies."

more...
No comment yet.