Anthro of the Bod...
Follow
Find
1.3K views | +0 today
Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo
An inclusive and post-consumer view on the Body+Mind+Spirit paradigm
Curated by eloisa
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

The 21st Century Body Symposium (UCL, 18 May 2012)

The 21st Century Body Symposium (UCL, 18 May 2012) | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it

What does it mean to be human in the 21st Century? In what ways is this question affected by new forms of technologies, such as biometrics or the evolution of genetic and neuroscience technologies?

 

Are our perceptions of human identity being recast in the light of these new scientific and technological developments? Are there, or should there be limits in what we can or should do to ourselves and our bodies? How and what does it mean to grow old now that the health and capacity of humans has been stretched for the over 50 population?

 

This symposium will seek to offer answers to some of these questions and in so doing contribute to the conversation on modern conceptions of human identity and perspectives on the human body.

 

Drawing from insights and ideas from across the disciplines, the aim will be to chart challenges to, and changes in perceptions of identity and the human body in the 21st century in the face of new advances in emerging technologies...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

Bodies of Vital Matter | Notions of Life Force and Transcendence in Traditional Southern Italy

Bodies of Vital Matter | Notions of Life Force and Transcendence in Traditional Southern Italy | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it

Free downloadable book:

 

"Bodies of Vital Matter presents an innovative study that explores folk beliefs relating to the vital force of the human body and to the transcendence of the corporal. The time frame is the period from the unification of Italy to the Second World War.There are three principal themes of investigation. A first theme is loss of vital force believed to result from the influence of other persons and beings. Topics discussed in this context are folk medicine and ideas concerning the humours of the human body, as well as beliefs relating to ‘thefts’ of mother’s milk, the evil eye, blood-sucking witches and the harmful influences of menstruating women.

A second theme is imageries of how life energy can be replenished from external sources. Here the focus is on popular cults of grace-giving martyrs and saints, on rural sanctuaries that connect with creative natural forces, and on the celebration of Easter and the Eucharistic Sacrifice in the Roman Catholic Mass.

The third principal theme is the denial of death as expressed in practices of entombment and by ideas about regeneration of new life from death; among the topics discussed are death and burial practices, the celebration of All Souls Day, and natural symbols of renewal and rebirth."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

Belief in Anthropology | Psychology Today

Belief in Anthropology | Psychology Today | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it
New ways of relating religion and science emerge. By Rosemary Joyce, Ph.D....

 

"... The anthropological study of religion is as old as the field, and has been a rich source of insight into how human life has been organized. Indeed, some anthropologists would argue that religiosity is a core part of what makes us human.S... But there is definitely something new about how anthropologists are approaching this sensitive topic.

Take Stanford University anthropologist Tanya Luhrmann as one example. In her recently released book, When God Talks Back, Luhrmann explores how prayer allows believers in an American evangelical church to hear the voice of god. While she disclaims a position on whether or not God exists, Luhrmann is clear that

"people did hear what they described as God's voice, and they sometimes heard that voice audibly."

Luhrmann, in ethnographic work, explored how believers cultivated the capacity to hear what others could not. Her work combined traditional ethnography with experiments that demonstrate real distinctions between those who used prayer to cultivate inner awareness, and others who did not:"I found that the prayer practice did sharpen people's mental imagery.... It also increased the chance they would report an unusual sensory experience....Some of them reported feeling God touch their shoulder or speak with them or interact with them in a way they actually experienced with their senses..."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

Fast Track to Health, Well-being and Happiness | The Emerging Profession of Health Coaches

Although health coaches may be the newest actors among health care professional groups, they are burdened with the most significant task–helping people change and grow. But having entered their camp for ethnographic study, I find it is a task they accept with relentless enthusiasm. As one coach trainer told me, “We’re just products of our product, facilitating the attainment of optimal health and happiness. Health coaching is not a job—it’s a way of life. You’ve got to walk the talk.”...

 

A central tenet of health coaches is that happiness and wellness are inextricably linked. As one coach from the UK said, “Our unhealthy lifestyles are responsible for mounting fatigue, physical toxicity, depression, and spiritual malaise. Coaching establishes a supportive alliance in which the client can tap into inner strengths and external resources to achieve health and vitality, and ultimately, happiness and fulfillment.”

 

While the pragmatic side of health coaching may highlight improvements in diet, exercise and stress reduction, there are integrative models that include numerous skill development exercises to increase the ratio of positive to negative emotions, enhanced social connection and belonging, along with fruitful engagement with a sense of purpose and meaning. The Authentic Happiness Coaching model (Seligman et al 2005) draws from scientific studies that reveal greater life satisfaction is largely a learned art. Process-oriented coaches hold conversations in which clients identify their strengths and values and learn to anchor them in their imaginations, remembering them when challenges and difficulties arise.

 

Many coach training programs emphasize the building of a safe and trusting relationship, similar to psychotherapy, whereby the client is willing to acknowledge undesirable habits or entrenched behavioral patterns which have derailed well-intentioned efforts in the past. “We come to coaching because we haven’t been able to achieve something on our own, and recognize that we need the perspective of someone who can see beyond the box we find ourselves in.”...

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

Download A Companion to the Anthropology of the Body and Embodiment - Free Ebooks Download

Download A Companion to the Anthropology of the Body and Embodiment - Free Ebooks Download | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it

FREE Download of the academic book "A Companion to the Anthropology of the Body and Embodiment"  featuring original essays that examine historical and contemporary approaches to conceptualizations of the body.

In this ground-breaking work on the body and embodiment, the latest scholarship from anthropology and related social science fields is presented, providing new insights on body politics and the experience of the bodyOriginal chapters cover historical and contemporary approaches and highlight new research frameworksReflects the increasing importance of embodiment and its ethnographic contexts within anthropologyHighlights the increasing emphasis on examining the production of scientific, technological, and medical expertise in studying bodies and embodiment.

more...
Nur Rosyid's curator insight, February 1, 10:20 AM

this book is awesome

Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

CultureLab: Forget fittest, it's survival of the most cultured

CultureLab: Forget fittest, it's survival of the most cultured | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it

Evolutionary biologist Mark Pagel enters tricky terrain to argue that social structures are key to human evolution in Wired for Culture

FOR decades, proponents of the power of culture in human development have been tribal enemies of those who champion the power of evolution. The former have been vilified for portraying humans as blank slates; the latter scorned for embracing genetic determinism. The middle ground was no-man's-land....

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by eloisa from My Favorite TED Talks
Scoop.it!

Jill Bolte Taylor's stroke of insight

 Jill Bolte Taylor got a research opportunity few brain scientists would wish for: She had a massive stroke, and watched as her brain functions -- motion, speech, self-awareness -- shut down one by one.


Via axelletess
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by eloisa from Augmented Collective Intelligence
Scoop.it!

Collective Intelligence 2012

"Collective intelligence has existed at least as long as humans have, because families, armies, countries, and companies have all--at least sometimes--acted collectively in ways that seem intelligent. But in the last decade or so a new kind of collective intelligence has emerged: groups of people and computers, connected by the Internet, collectively doing intelligent things. For example, Google technology harvests knowledge generated by millions of people creating and linking web pages and then uses this knowledge to answer queries in ways that often seem amazingly intelligent. Or in Wikipedia, thousands of people around the world have collectively created a very large and high quality intellectual product with almost no centralized control, and almost all as volunteers!

 

These early examples of Internet-enabled collective intelligence are not the end of the story but just the beginning. And in order to understand the possibilities and constraints of these new kinds of intelligence, we need a new interdisciplinary field. Forming such a field is one of the goals of this conference.

 

We seek papers about behavior that is both collective and intelligent. By collective, we mean groups of individual actors, including, for example, people, computational agents, and organizations. By intelligent, we mean that the collective behavior of the group exhibits characteristics such as, for example, perception, learning, judgment, or problem solving."


Via Howard Rheingold
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

Sprofondare nella disabilità

Sprofondare nella disabilità | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it

(di Matteo Schianchi*)

 

Anche quando si parla di disabilità in modo interessante e ricco - come in una recente recensione del quotidiano «il manifesto» - la disabilità stessa continua ad essere vista come una realtà "su cui intervenire", "per la quale fare qualcosa", "attraverso cui dire qualcos'altro". «C'è sempre - scrive Matteo Schianchi, in questa sua profonda riflessione - quel guardarla da un piedistallo, come qualcosa che è estraneo, anche quando si afferma di esserne coinvolti. Possibile che anche sul piano del pensiero si debba continuare a "fuggire dalla disabilità"?»

Mark Rothko, Untitled [Multiform], 1948È stata pubblicata su «il manifesto» del 21 febbraio scorso [Corpi disabili, resistenti al «normale», di Martino Doni, disponibile cliccando qui, N.d.R.] una recensione del testo di Julia Kristeva e Jean Vanier Il loro sguardo buca le nostre ombre (Roma, Donzelli, 2010) e questa è già una notizia, poiché la disabilità viene affrontata dalla stampa nazionale sotto un'altra luce rispetto ai soliti criteri e ad alcuni temi (spiace solo che ciò non avvenga più spesso).
Ora, non si tratta di chiosare nuovamente né su quel testo - di cui da queste stesse pagine non avevo sottaciuto né i pregi né i limiti [si legga nel nostro sito: M. Schianchi, Aleggiare sulla disabilità, cliccando qui, N.d.R.] -, né di avviare un dialogo a distanza con il recensore, Martino Doni. Da quella recensione emerge una visione della disabilità che forse vale la pena discutere, giacché simili temi non sono particolarmente consueti, né nella stampa, né in altre sedi.

Quella recensione è interessante e ricca. Il problema, però, è la frase conclusiva: «Il punto è proprio questo: di fronte al "grado zero" della fragilità, all'umanità nel suo stato puramente affidabile, non prestare fede è forse l'atto più colpevolmente empio che la civiltà dei consumi può perpetrare. Prendersi cura dello storpio, del cieco, del povero in spirito, invece, è forse l'unico vero atto di fede possibile per ripensare il senso dell'umanità, oggi e domani, nella dimensione penultima delle ore mortali».
Non ho dubbi sul fatto che culturalmente, politicamente e socialmente (in fatto di disabilità e molto altro), siamo «nella dimensione penultima delle ore mortali», né voglio spostare la questione sui diritti, sulle politiche e sulle cose più urgenti che circondano il mondo della disabilità. Resto sul piano culturale.
Il fatto che la disabilità torni ad essere - ora per carità, ora per eresia - qualcosa di cui "prendersi cura" è nuovamente inquietante. È mai possibile che non si riesca davvero mai a fare i conti con la dimensione articolata della disabilità, senza guardarla dall'alto al basso o senza considerarla uno strumento - qui - «per ripensare il senso dell’umanità»…?
Ovunque ci si giri, la disabilità è una realtà "su cui intervenire", "per la quale fare qualcosa", "attraverso cui dire qualcos'altro". C'è sempre quel guardarla da un piedistallo, come qualcosa che è estraneo anche quando si afferma di esserne coinvolti. È sempre metafora, segno, simbolo che rimanda ad altro (dalla precarietà dell'esistenza al castigo divino, dai misteri della vita alla dimensione della morte).
Io non nego l'esistenza di tutte queste percezioni per cui la disabilità è sempre un tramite per altro. Questa dimensione strumentale, infatti, è operante nelle culture, nelle pratiche, nelle credenze, nelle società, nelle psicologie individuali e collettive. Mi rammarico, invece, della persistente impossibilità di riuscire a pensare, foss'anche in un solo scritto o in un discorso, la disabilità in altro modo: il suo essere "una cosa in sé", pur nella sua infinita strumentalità.

La recensione di Doni si concentra sui temi della differenza e della profezia. Anche qui, differenza da qualcosa, profezia di qualcosa. Vien da pensare che anche queste sono delle fughe dalla disabilità in quanto tale. La disabilità "è". Si riesce - sul piano del pensiero almeno - a fare i conti con questa "essenza ontologica", oppure dobbiamo rassegnarci a pensarla sempre come il "simbolico Caronte" dell'essenza umana?
Caronte, appunto. Nel testo di Kristeva e Vanier, la «disabilità è allora integrazione della morte, che non vuol dire quieta e rassegnata accettazione», scrive il recensore. Di sicuro, il richiamo tra disabilità e morte è uno dei temi più operanti sul fronte simbolico, esistenziale, psicologico (ma attenzione a non ridurre tutto a queste dimensioni). In questo complesso binomio morte-disabilità, alla seconda si applicano automaticamente tutte le rimozioni di cui è oggetto anche la prima, sotto la forma del suo "essere strumento", giacché la disabilità è comunque vitale e non è definitiva come la morte. Entrambe, tuttavia, sottostanno - se non alla rassegnazione - alla volontà, al desiderio di abolirle, eliminarle, ridurne la fastidiosa portata, dando loro un rassicurante valore strumentale, incanalandole nel "già noto", per quanto inammissibile e inaccettabile.

In uno dei saggi che meglio descrive il rapporto con la morte, Lo scambio simbolico e la morte (Milano, Feltrinelli, 1984), Jean Baudrillard scriveva che siamo incapaci di fare i conti con la morte, come parte di noi: «[...] è la paranoia della ragione, i cui assiomi fanno sorgere ovunque l'inintelligibile assoluto, la Morte come inaccettabile e insolubile, l'Accidente come persecuzione, come resistenza assurda e malvagia d'una materia, d'una natura che non vuole mettersi in ordine sotto le leggi "oggettive" in cui è stata cacciata (p. 178)». Lo stesso accade con la disabilità, che deve sempre essere ricondotta ad altro, a "problematiche armonie" che vanno oltre, ancor prima di averci guardato seriamente dentro, talmente è un problema inconcepibile.

*Storico. Autore del libro La terza nazione del mondo. I disabili tra pregiudizio e realtà (Milano, Feltrinelli, 2009).

Fonte: superando.eosservice.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

On Forming a Digital Anthropology Group | Neuroanthropology

"We encourage the Executive Board to consider how to support anthropologists working online, and to encourage further online collaboration and dissemination among AAA members. This will strengthen the discipline, and also permit more timely discussion and engagement among AAA members…

We view our online role as anthropologists as contributing a valuable service to the discipline we love. We are hopeful that this episode in our shared history will prove to catalyze important and inclusive dialogue regarding who we are as anthropologists as well as the channels we use to communicate with one another. We encourage the EB and the AAA membership as a whole to participate in this online community, to hear and join with the voices that are coming from within our discipline. This is an opportunity to move past marginalization and work together toward rebuilding a truly interdisciplinary anthropology based on mutual respect."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

Interstress: intervista ad Andrea Gaggioli

Interstress: intervista ad Andrea Gaggioli | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it
Una nuova categoria di psicologi sta avanzando nell’approccio alle problematiche psichiche dei nostri tempi. Sono gli psicologi digitali. Hanno messo da parte lettini e seggiole degli analisti cl...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

Depression Is Linked to Hyperconnectivity of Brain Regions, a New Study Shows

Depression Is Linked to Hyperconnectivity of Brain Regions, a New Study Shows | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it
A depressed brain, says a new study, may be an organ whose regions are too inter-connected.

A new study reveals that people suffering from depression are characterized by an extreme synchronicity of brain regions that could indicate stymied, inflexible brains.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by eloisa from Anthrofutures
Scoop.it!

How We Became Posthuman: N Katherine Hayles

How We Became Posthuman: N Katherine Hayles | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it

Patterns of information are more essential to the state of being than any "material instantiation, so that embodiment in a biological substrate is seen as an accident of history rather than an inevitability of life" - "seamlessly articulated with intelligent machines. In the posthuman, there are no essential differences or absolute demarcations between bodily existence and computer simulation, cybernetic mechanism and biological organism, robot technology and human goals".


Via Richard Thomas
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

Ian Tattersall's 'Masters of the Planet' looks to pinpoint what made us human

Ian Tattersall's 'Masters of the Planet' looks to pinpoint what made us human | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it
Ian Tattersall illuminates the challenges to define what makes us human in "Masters of the Planet," an efficient survey of 7 million years of evolutionary development and two centuries of evolutionary thought.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

Changes in monkeys' social status affect their genes

Changes in monkeys' social status affect their genes | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it
A female's social status affects how her genes turn on and off, and those who rank higher tend to be healthier -- so long as their social status doesn't decline, according to a study of rhesus macaques.

 

"We're seeing that there are a lot of effects of social status on genes, including our own, but we are also seeing that many of the changes aren't permanent and that leads to more questions about how you regulate stress," Tung said. This study is "just the tip of the iceberg" when it comes to understanding the relationship between genomics and social environments said Jenny Tung, the study's lead author.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by eloisa from Healthcare Innovation
Scoop.it!

Lucy McRae: How can technology transform the human body?

TED Fellow Lucy McRae is a body architect. She imagines ways to merge biology and technology in our own bodies. In this visually stunning talk, she shows her work, from clothes that recreate the body's insides for a music video with pop-star Robyn, to a pill that, when swallowed, lets you sweat perfume.


Via Substance Active
more...
eloisa's comment, April 11, 2012 9:34 AM
tnx for sharing
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

Elusive Maladies | Finding Hope with Integrative Medicine in North America

Elusive Maladies | Finding Hope with Integrative Medicine in North America | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in 21st century North America has undergone a shift from margin to center, from a radical health movement resisting biomedical dominance in the 1970s to a merger with the medical mainstream in the 1990s. This narrative of a surprise-rebirth of CAM suggests a remarkable and rapid renaissance of heterodox medicine that was believed to have died by the 1920s as “regular” medicine established authoritative position as the sole form of legitimate healing practice. Historians of alternative medicine, however, suggest that such an assumption is short-sighted; that a more accurate history of the changes in the relationship between alternative therapies and conventional medicine expresses an interplay between individual choice (not necessarily or exclusively determined by degree of satisfaction with conventional care), professional competition and political will. Indeed, research conducted in North America by the authors flies in the face of the idea that a current resurgence of CAM is an indicator of radical cultural change and extreme dissatisfaction with conventional medicine. Based on ethnographic research in Toronto, Ontario and Portland, Oregon, the authors explore relationships between chronic pain experienced by individuals living with multi-symptom illnesses such as fibromyalgia, efforts by conventional doctors, nurse practitioners and CAM providers (naturopaths, acupuncturists, chiropractors) to integrate their services, and patient-reported outcomes of combining therapies....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

Incomplete Nature: How Mind Emerged From Matter « Wonderfest – Bay Area Beacon of Science

Incomplete Nature: How Mind Emerged From Matter « Wonderfest – Bay Area Beacon of Science | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it

Book presentation by Terrence Deacon, Prof. of Biological Anthropology & Neuroscience, UC Berkeley.

 

"Prof. Deacon’s presentation will focus on the central idea of his new book, “Incomplete Nature,” namely that key elements of consciousness (values, feelings, meanings, etc.) emerge from specific CONSTRAINTS on the physical processes of a nervous system....

 

Incomplete Nature begins by accepting what other theories try to deny: that, although mental contents do indeed lack these material-energetic properties, they are still entirely products of physical processes and have an unprecedented kind of causal power that is unlike anything that physics and chemistry alone have so far explained. Paradoxically, it is the intrinsic incompleteness of these semiotic and teleological phenomena that is the source of their unique form of physical influence in the world. Incomplete Nature meticulously traces the emergence of this special causal capacity from simple thermodynamics to self-organizing dynamics to living and mental dynamics, and it demonstrates how specific absences (or constraints) play the critical causal role in the organization of physical processes that generate these properties.

 

The book’s radically challenging conclusion is that we are made of these specific absences—such stuff as dreams are made on—and that what is not immediately present can be as physically potent as that which is...."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

The Master and His Emissary: Are Two Brains Better than One?

The Master and His Emissary: Are Two Brains Better than One? | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it

This review of Iain's McGilchrist's important book originally appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books.

For millennia it’s been known that the human brain is divided into two hemispheres, the left and the right, yet exactly why has never been clear. What purpose this division served once seemed so obscure that the idea that one hemisphere was a “spare,” in case something went wrong with the other, was taken quite seriously. Yet the idea that the brain’s hemispheres, though linked, worked independently has a long history. As early as the third century B.C., Greek physicians speculated that the brain’s right hemisphere was geared toward “perception,” while the left was specialized in “understanding,” a rough and ready characterization that carries into our own time. In the 1970s and 1980s, the “split brain” became a hot topic in neuroscience, and soon popular wisdom produced a flood of books explaining how the left brain was a “scientist” and the right an “artist.”

Much insight into human psychology can be gleaned from these popular accounts, but “hard” science soon recognized that this simple dichotomy could not accommodate the wealth of data that ongoing research into hemispheric function produced. And as no “real” scientist wants to be associated with popular misconceptions — for fear of peer disapproval — the fact that ongoing research revealed no appreciable functional differences between the hemispheres — they both seemed to “do” the same things, after all — made it justifiable for neuroscientists to put the split-brain question on the back burner, where it has pretty much stayed. Until now...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by eloisa from My Favorite TED Talks
Scoop.it!

Wade Davis: The worldwide web of belief and ritual

TED Talks Anthropologist Wade Davis muses on the worldwide web of belief and ritual that makes us human.

Via axelletess
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

Killing the Doctors When They Refused to Cry Uncle » Counterpunch: Tells the Facts, Names the Names

Killing the Doctors When They Refused to Cry Uncle » Counterpunch: Tells the Facts, Names the Names | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it
Killing the Doctors When They Refused to Cry Uncle...

An interview with War Correspondent turned anthropologist Sandy Smith-Nonini who in 2010 published the book "Healing the Body Politic: El Salvador's Popular Struggle for Health Rights from Civil War to Neoliberal Peace".

 

"BMcK: Why did you decide to go to graduate school in anthropology after a decade working as a war correspondent and a health activist?

SSN: To understand what just happened.

BMcK: You mean over the previous decade?

SSN: Yes, I knew politically what happened, but I wanted to delve into the deeper cultural issues. I needed to understand how something like health care for poor peasants could so threaten military authorities that they would actually target clinics and kill health workers.

BMcK: That must have been a culture shock, going from the front lines to the seminar room.

SSN: Definitely. My experience in graduate school was excruciating. I had the bad luck to re-enter the academy right after the fall of the Berlin Wall, at the height of Postmodernism and the “culture wars.” Here I was fresh out of a civil war in a place where class struggle held great resonance, and I was being told by professors that the notion of solidarity was out of date. For years anyone who studied political economy was stigmatized. Then around 1998 many academics discovered that some training in political economy is actually pretty helpful if you want to understand neoliberal economics.

BMcK: Tell me about your first experiences as an activist.

SSN: It was an inauspicious beginning. After taking up running in high school in the 1970s, I began my freshman year at Duke in 1974, only to learn that there was no women’s track team. Title IX, a law which required women’s parity in college athletics, was new on the books. It seemed straight-forward. I went to the head of the athletic department and asked them to start a team.

He said no, that first there needed to be evidence of women’s interest in a sport. So I acquired a list of all freshman girls who had run track in high school, wrote them letters and organized a voluntary club. We got permission for them to train with the men’s team under Coach Al Buehler, a former coach of the US Olympic cross-country team. Our “Duke Track Club” began independently competing against official college women’s teams . . . and winning. Each year I’d go back to the officials and ask, but they kept stalling on hiring a women’s coach. Then I graduated, but less than two years later Coach Buehler, who was now promoted to athletic director, asked the men’s team to give up funds to establish a women’s track team...."

 

Click on this link to continue: http://www.counterpunch.org/2012/02/27/killing-the-doctors-when-they-refused-to-cry-uncle/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

RSA Animate - The Divided Brain

In this new RSAnimate, renowned psychiatrist and writer Iain McGilchrist explains how our 'divided brain' has profoundly altered human behaviour, culture and...
more...
eloisa's comment, March 1, 2012 3:14 AM
Read also Iain McGilchrist's book review by Gary Lachman here: http://dailygrail.com/blogs/Gary-Lachman/2012/2/The-Master-and-His-Emissary-Are-Two-Brains-Better-One
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

Origins Of Us Episode 1 Bones (BBC)

This is a 3-part biological anthropology documentary that explores how our species, homo sapiens sapiens, came to being.

Each episode is about 47 minutes long and in high-definition.

Enjoy!

 

BBC | ORIGINS OF US: "Dr Alice Roberts reveals how your body tells the story of human evolution. The way you look, think and behave is a product of a 6 million year struggle for survival. We have uncovered the secrets of the atom and travelled to the moon. But how did humans come to be so successful? This series explores the anatomical changes that have given us, and our ancestors, the edge. Everything from the way that we walk, to the shape of our jaw and even the way our thumbs move connects us intimately to the struggles and triumphs of our ancestors. Yet many of those changes have come at a surprising cost and the problems we face now are a direct consequence of our evolutionary journey. As much about our bodies today as about our bodies 6 million years ago, Origins of Us will change the way you see yourself."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eloisa
Scoop.it!

Once dismissed as pretentious but now brain scans prove Eastern philosophies can be effective in treating mental illness

Once dismissed as pretentious but now brain scans prove Eastern philosophies can be effective in treating mental illness | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it
A sceptical Erica Crompton tried the new 'mindfulness' therapy and was astonished by the results. Britain's medical experts are starting to believe that meditation might just help.

 

‘Meditation helps to reduce the activity of part of the brain called the amygdala, which governs feelings of stress. Those who are more stressed and anxious have an amygdala that is overactive. Meditating reduces this.

‘And there is an effect on the insula, the part of the brain involved in deep emotions...Normally activity in this area is closely linked to the part of the brain involved in analytical thought...

In those with mental illness, this loop becomes overactive – the thinking feeds the emotions, which feeds more thinking until it becomes overwhelming...

'It doesn’t stop a person from feeling or thinking but it uncouples these two parts of the brain, giving the patient more control."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by eloisa from Anthrofutures
Scoop.it!

New in Books: Anthropological Futures

New in Books: Anthropological Futures | Anthro of the Body | Appunti sparsi di Antropologia del Corpo | Scoop.it
Duke University Press...

In Anthropological Futures, Michael M. J. Fischer explores the uses of anthropology as a mode of philosophical inquiry, an evolving academic discipline, and a means for explicating the complex and shifting interweaving of human bonds and social interactions on a global level. Through linked essays, which are both speculative and experimental, Fischer seeks to break new ground for anthropology by illuminating the field’s broad analytical capacity and its attentiveness to emergent cultural systems.


Via Richard Thomas
more...
No comment yet.