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Black Death - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, killing an estimated 75 to 200 million people and peaking in Europe in the years 1348–50 CE.[1][2][3] Although there were several competing theories as to the etiology of the Black Death, recent analysis of DNA from victims in northern and southern Europe indicates that the pathogen responsible was the Yersinia pestis bacterium, probably causing several forms of plague.[4][5]

The Black Death is thought to have started in China or central Asia.[6] It then travelled along the Silk Road and reached the Crimea by 1346. From there, it was most likely carried by Oriental rat fleas living on the black rats that were regular passengers on merchant ships. Spreading throughout the Mediterranean and Europe, the Black Death is estimated to have killed 30–60% of Europe's total population.[7] All in all, the plague reduced the world population from an estimated 450 million down to 350–375 million in the 14th century.

The aftermath of the plague created a series of religious, social, and economic upheavals, which had profound effects on the course of European history. It took 150 years for Europe's population to recover. The plague reoccurred occasionally in Europe until the 19th century.


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Anthony Ernst's curator insight, August 19, 2013 7:37 AM

A good start for your Plague knowledge... Check it out!

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Avignon the City of the Popes

Avignon the City of the Popes | Anna | Scoop.it

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Anthony Ernst's curator insight, August 21, 2013 10:05 AM

A webiste for information on Avignon and its history

Daniel Dolan's comment, August 22, 2013 10:38 AM
Woohoo I follow you
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Avignon papacy (Roman Catholicism)

Avignon papacy (Roman Catholicism) | Anna | Scoop.it
Roman Catholic papacy during the period 1309–77, when the popes took up residence at Avignon instead of at Rome, primarily because of the current political conditions. Distressed by factionalism in Rome...

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Anthony Ernst's curator insight, August 20, 2013 1:05 PM

A general reference to what the Avigno Papacy was all about.