animals and prosocial capacities
4.5K views | +0 today
Follow
 
animals and prosocial capacities
Prosocial capacities shared by humans and other species: empathy, reciprocity, altruism, bonding, play, tool use, communication
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Farming, Forests, Water, Fishing and Environment
Scoop.it!

The 1 Percent Versus a Tiny Endangered Seabird

The 1 Percent Versus a Tiny Endangered Seabird | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Visiting Nantucket a few years ago, I was dismayed to hear some of the island’s wealthy retirees complaining that the damned piping plovers were keeping them from their chosen fishing spots. The plovers, small beach-nesting birds, are a threatened species along the Atlantic coast and endangered in the Midwest. And I had naively assumed that people with the money to summer in one of the world’s priciest destinations might have a little sympathy for birds that barely manage to survive at all on the open beach.

Not so. The recreational anglers were determined to drive their off-road vehicles out the sandy spit of land called Great Point to their favorite surfcasting spots, and they were enraged that designated protected areas and buffer zones around plover nests blocked certain areas in breeding season. 

Via pdeppisch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and Animals
Scoop.it!

When hurt, rodents may console each other: neural mechanisms underlying empathetic responses

When hurt, rodents may console each other:  neural mechanisms underlying empathetic responses | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Young said his research points to a potential role for oxytocin in the treatment of autism spectrum disorder, though more work is needed. “

We now have the opportunity to explore in detail the neural mechanisms underlying empathetic responses in a laboratory rodent with clear implications for humans.”

According to study co-author Frans de Waal, who first discovered animal consolation behavior in chimpanzees in 1979, the findings also shed new light on the range of animals that feel empathy, and how empathy is separate from complex cognition.


Scientists have been reluctant to attribute empathy to animals, often assuming selfish motives,” he said.


 TODD AHERN / EMORY UNIVERSITY


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and HealthCare
Scoop.it!

Dogs are experts at reading human EMOTIONS: how dogs seem able to show empathy.

Dogs are experts at reading human EMOTIONS:  how dogs seem able to show empathy. | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Dogs can read human emotions: Canines recognise when people are feeling happy or sad, even if they've never met them 


  • Scientists tested dogs' ability to read the emotions of human strangers 
  • They were able to combine facial expressions with the tone of voice
  • Dogs were also highly attuned to detecting emotions in other canines
  • Results prove dogs recognise emotions in all humans not just their owners



Scientists believe they have unravelled just how dogs seem able to show empathy.


It is because they are able to rapidly mimic or 'catch' emotions, research suggests.
 

In humans, it has been shown that when experiencing empathy, humans tend to mirror or mimic the emotional expression of the person they are engaging with.
 

Now researchers led by Elisabetta Palagi, of the University of Pisa have found that dogs possess a key 'building-block of empathy' - being able to mimic emotional behaviour in other dogs.
 


By FIONA MACRAE  


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
recherche Info - MH's curator insight, January 13, 4:51 PM

By Fiona Macrae, Science Editor For The Daily Mail, 13.01.2016


Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, January 15, 11:52 PM

LOS PERROS SON EXPERTOS EN LEER LAS EMOCIONES HUMANAS - LOS CIENTÍFICOS CREEN HABER DESENTRAÑADO CÓMO LOS PERROS PARECEN SER CAPACES DE MOSTRAR EMPATÍA .ELLOS RECONOCEN CUÁNDO UNA PERSONA SE SIENTE TRISTE O FELIZ AUNQUE NUNCA LA HAYAN VISTO ANTES.

Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Human Rights & Civil Rights & Animal Rights & Global Rights
Scoop.it!

Help Keep The Puppy Love Project From Drowning

Help Keep The Puppy Love Project From Drowning | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Starting 2016 in debt was not the vision that I had, but it's my reality. The pack needed to be fed, the chained dogs needed their housing winterized, the medical fosters needed follow up vet appointments..... And the hits just keep coming. Tomorrow is Friday. I will need to feed roughly 50 souls...

Via Dana Hoffman
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Biological 'clock' discovered in sea turtle shells

Biological 'clock' discovered in sea turtle shells | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

Radiocarbon dating of atomic bomb fallout found in sea turtle shells can be used to reliably estimate the ages, growth rates and reproductive maturity of sea turtle populations in the wild, a new study led by Duke University ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Using robots to understand animal cognition - The Lincoln Repository

Using robots to understand animal cognition - The Lincoln Repository | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

The easy way to access online services at the University of Lincoln.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and Animals
Scoop.it!

New study pinpoints why dogs are good at sensing emotions: show basic signs of empathy.

New study pinpoints why dogs are good at sensing emotions:  show basic signs of empathy. | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

New research has found that dogs can mimic the expressions of people and other dogs, and show basic signs of empathy.


They are known as 'man’s best friend', and new research from Italy is attempting to prove that statement has more scientific evidence to support it than we might think.

According to a study by the Royal Society Open Science, dogs can instantly mimic each other’s facial expressions, as well as that of their owners and other humans they interact with.

As part of the research, 49 dogs were filmed playing in a dog park - with their playful behaviour noted in various forms: such as when a dog keeps its mouth open and relaxed, or when it crouches on its front legs and wags its tail.


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

How can technology help humans and animals communicate? Speech vests for service dogs, of course

How can technology help humans and animals communicate? Speech vests for service dogs, of course | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

The new field of animal-computer interaction is developing tech to help service dogs and other animals communicate more effectively with humans.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from De Natura Rerum
Scoop.it!

When and where did wolves become dogs?

When and where did wolves become dogs? | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
New research has mapped the history of man’s best friend, as told through their DNA.

Via Mariaschnee, Christian Allié
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Help Critical Whale Research & Education: SatTags & STEM

Advancing Research & STEM: Engaging students, educators, and scientists around the world in real-time marine mammal "Citizen Science"

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

The first fish seen leaping out of water to attack prey from air

The first fish seen leaping out of water to attack prey from air | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

That’s one small jump for a fish, but a big leap for fish kind. Needlefish have been seen shooting out of the water before smashing into schools of unsuspecting prey in the waters near Heron Island and North Stradbroke Island in Queensland, Australia. “This is, as far as we know, the first time anyone has described a fish jumping out of the water to attack submerged prey,” says Ryan Day of the University of Tasmania in Hobart, Australia.


Needlefish live and feed close to the surface in tropical and temperate coastal waters. They are noted for tail walking on the water’s surface, and leaping out at speeds of up to 65 kilometres an hour to escape predators such as dolphins. It’s not unheard of for these projectile fish to injure unfortunate humans in their path. Now it seems they can employ their leaping aptitude to hunt smaller fish, which they usually stalk at a distance of about 1 to 2 meters. The initial approach is easy, but it’s the last meter or so that really counts. Day suspects the strategy allows them to extend their attack range four-fold by disappearing just before they strike. “Once it leaps out of the water, it is essentially invisible, pretty much until it crashes through the water,” he says.


When needlefish try to attack prey without jumping, their attack range is about 50 centimetres. With the leap, this extends to about 2 metres, making it tougher for the prey to escape, Day says. Needlefish are not the only ones that can leap above the water’s surface. Their relatives from the Beloniformesfamily, such as flying fish and halfbeaks, do it too, but for them the manoeuvre is a way to evade predators rather than attack prey. Stalking less aquatic prey, African tigerfish have been spotted leaping to grab flying birds.


Reference: Journal of Fish Biology, DOI: 10.1111/jfb.12799



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Dogs may ease a child's fears

Dogs may ease a child's fears | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
(HealthDay)—The companionship of a dog may lower a child's anxiety levels, a new study suggests.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

New Technique Enables Long-Term Brain Imaging In Primates

New Technique Enables Long-Term Brain Imaging In Primates | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Researchers have developed a system to reversibly light up selected neurons in the brains of marmosets over several months.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Removing senescent cells makes mice live longer and prosper

Removing senescent cells makes mice live longer and prosper | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

Killing worn-out cells helps middle-aged mice live longer, healthier lives, a new study suggests. Removing those worn-out or “senescent” cells increased the median life span of mice from 24 to 27 percent over that of rodents in which senescent cells built up normally with age, Mayo Clinic researchers report online February 3 in Nature. Clearing senescent cells also improved heart and kidney function, the researchers found.


If the results hold up in people, they could lead to an entirely new way to treat aging, says gerontology and cancer researcher Norman Sharpless at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill. Most prospective antiaging treatments would require people to take a drug for decades. Periodically zapping senescent cells might temporarily turn back the clock and improve health for people who are already aging, he says. “If this paper is right, I believe it will be one of the most important aging papers ever,” Sharpless says.


Senescent cells are ones that have ceased to divide and do their usual jobs. Instead, they hunker down and pump out inflammatory chemicals that may damage surrounding tissues and promote further aging. “They’re zombie cells,” says Steven Austad, a biogerontologist at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. ”They’ve outlived their usefulness. They’re bad.”


Cancer biologist Jan van Deursen of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues devised the strategy for eliminating senescent cells by making the cells commit suicide. A protein called p16 builds up in senescent cells, the researchers had previously discovered. The team hooked up a gene for a protein that causes cells to kill themselves to DNA that helps turn on p16 production, so that whenever p16 was made the suicide protein was also made.


The suicide protein needs a partner chemical to actually kill cells, though. Once mice were a year old — 40 to 60 years old in human terms — the researchers started injecting them with the partner chemical. Mice got injections about every three days for six months. Mice that got the cell-suicide cocktail were compared with genetically engineered mice that were injected with a placebo mix.


Senescent cells were easier to kill in some organs than others, the researchers found. Colon and liver senescent cells weren’t killed, for instance. But age-related declines in the function of organs in which the treatment worked — eyes, fat, heart and kidney —were slowed.


Genetic engineering and regular shots would not be feasible for use in people, but several companies are developing drugs that might clear the zombie cells from humans, Austad says. Some side effects to the treatment in mice also would be important to consider if those drugs are ever used in people. Senescent cells have previously been shown to be needed for wound healing, and mice that got the killing cocktail couldn’t repair wounds as well as those that didn’t get the treatment. Once treatment stopped, the mice were able to heal normally again. That result suggests that people undergoing senescent-cell therapy might need to stop temporarily to heal wounds from surgery or accidents.



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and Animals
Scoop.it!

Prairie Voles Show Empathy Just Like Humans

Prairie Voles Show Empathy Just Like Humans | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Until now, consolation has only been observed in relatively large brained animals—apes, elephants, dogs, and some large birds.


This study shows for the first time, however, that animals as small as rodents are capable of empathetic behaviors that extend beyond just ensuring their offspring survive, to actually helping others around them that are in need.


“Consolation might be present in many more animal species than was previously thought,” says James Burkett, a neuroscientist at Emory University and lead author of the study...


“This does not mean animals experience empathy in the same way we do, but the basic foundation for empathy and consolation may be present in many more species than once thought.”


By Grennan Milliken P


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Cities, urban management and ecosystem services
Scoop.it!

Urban Bat Ecology

Urban Bat Ecology | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

Urban Growth The rapid global urban population growth seen in the last 65 years, from 746 million to 3.9 billion in 2014, has had significant impacts on bat species richness and abundance (WUP 2014, Kunz et al 2007), due to habitat loss, fragmentation,...


Via Mário Carmo
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Team reprograms social behavior in carpenter ants using epigenetic drugs

Team reprograms social behavior in carpenter ants using epigenetic drugs | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

In Florida carpenter ant colonies, distinct worker castes called minors and majors exhibit pronounced differences in social behavior throughout their lives. In a new study published today in Science, a multi-institution team ...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Open Letter to Organizations that Research and Promote Empathy and Compassion

Open Letter to Organizations that Research and Promote Empathy and Compassion | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Empathy and Compassion

Research, such as that reported in Kate Stewart and Matthew Cole’s book, Our Children and Other Animals: The Cultural Construction of Human-Animal Relations in Childhood, shows how children have a great capacity for empathy for and desire to protect nonhuman animals and how we, as a society teach our children a separate morality for animals used for food. 


This is evidenced by children’s affinity for many nonhuman animals. Our social norms often pressure children and adults to disconnect from their empathy and compassion for other animals. And that is shown by our media and food traditions.




Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Crows caught on camera fashioning special hook tools

Crows caught on camera fashioning special hook tools | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

Dr Jolyon Troscianko, from the University of Exeter, and Dr Christian Rutz, from the University of St Andrews, have captured first video recordings documenting how these tropical corvids fashion these particularly complex ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

This Coffee Shop Lets Stray Dogs Sleep Inside Every Night When The Customers Leave

This Coffee Shop Lets Stray Dogs Sleep Inside Every Night When The Customers Leave | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

In Greece, people abandon their beloved pets because they can’t afford to keep them anymore; luckily, there’re places like Hott Spott, a cafe in Mytilene, Lesbos, which opens its doors to stray dogs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Dogs Help Teens Recover From Mental Health Disorders

Dogs Help Teens Recover From Mental Health Disorders | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

New research suggests animal-assisted therapy is effective in improving social and psychological functioning in adolescents with mental disorders.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Study shows you get better sleep if your cat or dog is in the bed

Study shows you get better sleep if your cat or dog is in the bed | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

Researchers from the Center for Sleep Medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona released a new study showed 41% of participants said they sleep better with pets.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from De Natura Rerum
Scoop.it!

Asteroid impact helped create the birds we know today

Asteroid impact helped create the birds we know today | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

"The ancestors of all modern birds, from the hummingbird to the majestic bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus, seen here as a young adult), lived on a supercontinent in the Southern Hemisphere about 95 million years ago, a new study suggests."


Via Mariaschnee, Christian Allié
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Limitless learning Universe
Scoop.it!

#Elephants can hear the sound of approaching clouds #biology #science

#Elephants can hear the sound of approaching clouds #biology #science | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

They can sense low-frequency rumbles that human ears can't sense, allowing them to pick up when a storm is coming...


Via David McConville, CineversityTV
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jocelyn Stoller
Scoop.it!

Many smaller animals clean themselves to survive, study finds

Many smaller animals clean themselves to survive, study finds | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Going without a shower for a few days might make you feel gross, but for small animals like bees and houseflies, keeping clean is a matter of life or death.
more...
No comment yet.