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Ducklings Climbing Stairs And Battling Their Fears In Adorable Video - Huffington Post

Ducklings Climbing Stairs And Battling Their Fears In Adorable Video - Huffington Post | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Ducklings Climbing Stairs And Battling Their Fears In Adorable Video
Huffington Post
... many with bite wounds. He has been banned from keeping animals and faces a court case for animal cruelty. ...
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animals and prosocial capacities
Prosocial capacities shared by humans and other species: empathy, reciprocity, altruism, bonding, play, tool use, communication
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from DNA & RNA Research
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Ancient wolf genome pushes back dawn of the dog

Ancient wolf genome pushes back dawn of the dog | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

DNA from 35,000-year-old Siberian wolf suggests that domesticated dogs emerged thousands of years earlier than previously thought.


Via Integrated DNA Technologies
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Brains, Genes, and Primates: The future of higher research on the planet of the apes

Brains, Genes, and Primates: The future of higher research on the planet of the apes | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
(Phys.org)—'Brains, Genes, and Primates' is the title of a curious perspective article recently published in the journal Neuron.
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When Birds Squawk, Other Species Seem to Listen

When Birds Squawk, Other Species Seem to Listen | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
MISSOULA, Mont. — In the backyard of a woodsy home outside this college town, small birds — black-capped chickadees, mountain chickadees, red-breasted nuthatches — flitted to and from the yard’s feeder. They were oblivious to a curious stand nearby, topped by a curtain that was painted to resemble bark.

Erick Greene, a professor of biology at the University of Montana, stepped away from the stand and stood by the home’s backdoor. He pressed the fob of a modified garage-door opener. The curtain dropped, unveiling a taxidermied northern pygmy owl. Its robotic head moved from side to side, as if scanning for its next meal.

The yard hushed, then erupted in sound. Soon birds arrived from throughout the neighborhood to ornament the branches of a hawthorn above the mobbed owl and call out yank-yank and chick-a-dee.

As a recorder captured the ruckus, its instigator grinned with delight. “For birds, this is like a riot,” Dr. Greene said afterward, adding that he heard “a whole set of acoustic stuff going on that’s just associated with predators.” The distinctions are subtle — “even good naturalists and birders can miss this stuff,” he added.
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Seeing humanity in farm animals

Seeing humanity in farm animals | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Photographer Ronan Yver spent several years with farm animals, getting to know their personalities through his wide-angle lens.
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Rats forsake chocolate to save a drowning companion: the rodents feel empathy.

Rats forsake chocolate to save a drowning companion:  the rodents feel empathy. | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

We’ve all heard how rats will abandon a sinking ship. But will the rodents attempt to save their companions in the process? A new study shows that rats will, indeed, rescue their distressed pals from the drink—even when they’re offered chocolate instead.


They’re also more likely to help when they’ve had an unpleasant swimming experience of their own, adding to growing evidence that the rodents feel empathy.


By Emily Underwood 



Via Edwin Rutsch
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Brenda Robinson's curator insight, May 13, 9:54 PM

Hon. Liz Sandals: Introduce a new course called "COMPASSION" for Grade 1 and Grade 12. https://www.change.org/p/hon-liz-sandals-introduce-a-new-course-called-compassion-for-grade-1-and-grade-12

Larry Glover's curator insight, May 15, 11:31 AM

Our empathy, like our resilience, is part of a deep tap root of the Tree of Life itself. And in the case of this research, demonstrating our belonging, with all our other than human relations, to this very Tree.

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A helping paw for a sinking rat

A helping paw for a sinking rat | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Rats have more heart than you might think. When one is drowning, another will put out a helping paw to rescue its mate. This is especially true for rats that previously had a watery near-death experience, says Nobuya Sato and colleagues of the Kwansei Gakuin University in Japan. Their findings are published in Springer's journal Animal Cognition.

Recent research has shown that a rat will help members of its own species to escape from a tubelike cage. The helping rat will show such prosocial behavior even if it does not gain any advantage from it. To see whether these rodents will also help when one of their own is about to drown, Sato's team conducted three sets of experiments involving a pool of water. One rat was made to swim for its life in the pool, with another being in a cage adjacent to it. The soaked rat could only gain access to a dry and safe area in the cage if its cagemate opened a door for it.
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Why Do Cats Purr? It’s Not Just Because They’re Happy

Why Do Cats Purr? It’s Not Just Because They’re Happy | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Why is your cat purring? He might be happy to see you, or hungry, or hurt...or he might just be trying to regenerate his bones.
The post Why Do Cats Purr? It’s Not Just Because They’re Happy appeared first on WIRED.
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Video of jaguar swimming underwater goes viral

Video of jaguar swimming underwater goes viral | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Amazing footage shows how jaguars are accustomed to water as well as the jungle

Via TheNaturalist
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Keen sense of touch guides nimble bat flight

Keen sense of touch guides nimble bat flight | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Bats fly with breathtaking precision because their wings are equipped with highly sensitive touch sensors, cells that respond to even slight changes in airflow, researchers have demonstrated for the first time.
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High-pitched sounds cause seizures in old cats: Certain breeds more susceptible

High-pitched sounds cause seizures in old cats: Certain breeds more susceptible | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Sharp high-pitched sounds have been found to cause seizures in older cats.
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Why do animals fight members of other species?

Why do animals fight members of other species? | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Why do animals fight with members of other species? A nine-year study by UCLA biologists says the reason often has to do with "obtaining priority access to females" in the area.
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Chimpanzee ‘personhood’ case sows confusion

Chimpanzee ‘personhood’ case sows confusion | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
New York judge amends an order that animal rights group said granted a writ of habeas corpus to two research animals.
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Inside the Wonderful World of Bee Cognition – Where We’re at Now | Not bad science, Scientific American Blog Network

Inside the Wonderful World of Bee Cognition – Where We’re at Now | Not bad science, Scientific American Blog Network | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
As I wrote about in my last post, bees are capable of learning which flowers offer good nectar rewards based on floral features such as colour, smell, shape, texture, pattern, temperature and electric charge. They do this through associative learning: learning that a ‘conditioned stimulus’ (for example, the colour yellow) is associated with an ‘unconditioned stimulus’ (nectar). Learning simple associations like these is the basis of all learning – pretty much all animals do it, from humans to the sea slug which doesn’t even have a brain.
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Male Java sparrows may 'drum' to their songs

Male Java sparrows may 'drum' to their songs | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Male Java sparrows may coordinate their bill-clicking sounds with the notes of their song, according to a study published May 20, 2015 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Masayo Soma and Chihiro Mori from Hokkaido University, Japan.
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Service dogs that sniff out seizures improve kids' lives

Service dogs that sniff out seizures improve kids' lives | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
When Alyssa Howes was 4, she lost her sight and started having seizures—up to 20 a day.
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Spotting pain in donkeys – learning the language

Spotting pain in donkeys – learning the language | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Vets in Pakistan working for global equine welfare charity the Brooke have collaborated with the University of Bristol on a newly published paper to discover whether a donkey is in pain by just being observed.
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Play behaviour, positive emotions and the assessment of animal welfare - Jeff Rushen

 

"The CCSAW 8th Annual Animal Welfare Research Symposium is THIS WEEK ! The program is now online - The Symposium covers a range of topics related to animal welfare, animal ethics and the role of animals in society. This event has something for everyone - our program features animal welfare research on dairy cows, horses, pigs, laying hens, turkeys,
tigers, cats, dogs, and mice."


Via For The Voiceless
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How Showing Compassion for Animals Can Improve Your Health

How Showing Compassion for Animals Can Improve Your Health | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

The effects of compassion are far reaching and have been shown to have benefits for physical as well as psychological health. A wealth of evidence demonstrates that social support, when humans connect in a meaningful way with other people or animals, helps in the recovery from illness as well as promoting increased levels of mental and physical well-being.

Evidence from studies mentioned in the previous blog suggests that interventions can lead to reduced depressive symptoms and feelings of isolation, improvements in positive emotions, psychological well-being, hopefulness, optimism, social connection, life satisfaction, and, of specific interest to this paper –  compassion....

Cultivating compassion for all living beings and practicing a compassionate lifestyle can, therefore, help boost social connection and also improve physical and mental health. 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Bat research by Israeli scientist alters concepts on mammal hibernation - Jerusalem Post Israel News

Bat research by Israeli scientist alters concepts on mammal hibernation - Jerusalem Post Israel News | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Hibernation was believed to occur only in low temperatures, as mammals sleep through three to nine months of cold and hazardous winter with a very low heart rate and body temperature.
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Apes under pressure show their ingenuity – and hint at our own evolutionary past

Apes under pressure show their ingenuity – and hint at our own evolutionary past | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
In the mid 20th century, when paleoanthropologist Louis Leakey sent three pioneering women to study great apes in their natural habitats, the Earth's wilderness was still untouched in many places.
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Photographers explore relationship between dogs, owners

Photographers explore relationship between dogs, owners | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Photographers Will Robson-Scott and Ollie Grove's photo book "In Dogs We Trust" explores the special relationship that exists between dogs and their owners.
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NASA contributes to first global review of Arctic marine mammals

NASA contributes to first global review of Arctic marine mammals | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Many human communities want answers about the current status and future of Arctic marine mammals, including scientists who dedicate their lives to study them and indigenous people whose traditional ways of subsistence are intertwined with the fate...
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Dolphins use extra energy to communicate in noisy waters

Dolphins use extra energy to communicate in noisy waters | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
Dolphins that raise their voices to be heard in noisy environments expend extra energy in doing so, according to new research that for the first time measures the biological costs to marine mammals of trying to communicate over the sounds of ship traffic or other sources.
While dolphins expend only slightly more energy on louder whistles or other vocalizations, the metabolic cost may add up over time when the animals must compensate for chronic background noise, according to the research by scientists at NOAA Fisheries' Northwest Fisheries Science Center and the University of California Santa Cruz.
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Backyard birds enhance life in urban neighborhoods

Backyard birds enhance life in urban neighborhoods | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it
How aware are you of the birds that live in your neighborhood? Do you know how many different species there are? Do enjoy your local birds, or find them annoying? J. Amy Belaire of St. Edward's University, Lynne Westphal of the U.S.
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Water Automatically Leaps Off A Gecko’s Self-Cleaning Skin

Water Automatically Leaps Off A Gecko’s Self-Cleaning Skin | animals and prosocial capacities | Scoop.it

It started when Jolanta Watson put a frozen box-patterned gecko on a glass slide. The lizard’s skin is adorned with beautiful auburn and tan blotches, and Watson wanted to study it under a microscope. But as she reached for a scalpel, she noticed that tiny water droplets had formed on the slide. The longer she looked, the more droplets there were. Where were they coming from? The microscope revealed the answer. Through its lens, Watson saw that droplets would condense on the gecko’s skin, roll into each other, and jump off under their own power. That’s why the slide was wet. The box-patterned gecko’s skin can actively repel water even if it’s dead and immobile. And when it’s alive, it can use this phenomenon, which Watson calls “geckovescence”, to clean itself with no effort.


There are some 1,500 species of geckos, which are best known for their stickyfeet. Their toes are covered in thousands of microscopic hairs that allow them to cling to seemingly flat surfaces—including the walls of Watson’s Australian home. As she and her husband Gregory watched these lizards, they realised that scientists had largely ignored the rest of the gecko’s body. Their toes were cool, but what about the rest of their skin? In particular, how does it deal with water?


The box-patterned gecko lives in the Australian desert, where rainfall is rare and water is scarce. Still, chilly nights and humid mornings can produce a lot of dew, some of which condenses on the gecko’s skin. That’s a problem: water-logged skin is a breeding ground for microbes and fungi, which could potentially cause diseases. Fortunately, as the Watsons found, the gecko can automatically dry itself. When they looked at the lizard’s skin under the microscope, they saw that its scales are like rounded domes. Each of these is covered in miniscule hairs, just a few millionths of a metre long, about the size of a small bacterium. They’re densely packed too: thousands of them would fit in the cross-section of a single human hair.


Many natural structures, including springtailsleafhopperslotus leaves, andguillemot eggs, use similar microscopic textures to waterproof themselves. The principles are always the same: there are raised sections, like the gecko’s hairs, that trap pockets of air and stop water from seeping into the spaces between them. When droplets form, they sit on top of the raised bits as nigh-perfect spheres, rather than flattening out as they would do on a tabletop or on your skin.


The Watsons saw exactly this when they cooled gecko skin to the point when dew started to condense. Spherical droplets appeared, and grew. When they touched each other, they merged. And when they merged, they would occasionally fly off. Why? Because when two droplets unite, their volume stays the same but their combined surface area—and thus, their surface energy—goes down. They convert some of that surface energy into kinetic energy, and if the trade-off is substantial enough, they can launch themselves into the air.


All of this happens without help from any external forces, but external forcescan help. In fog, water droplets in the air collide with those on the gecko’s skin, increasing the odds that they will jump off. Here’s a series of images showing one such jump. Wind helps too; it blows droplets into each other, and carries the airborne drops away from the lizard.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 23, 8:44 AM

Water is amazing, and geckos, too.