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Something to read before your gap year project. | Worldwide Experience

Something to read before your gap year project. | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
If you’re off to Africa to work on a gap year project on animal conservation project here are a couple of books that will whet your appetite.
WorldWideExperience's insight:

So you have made you choice,everything is in place  and you are ready to go.How do you fill in the time before you leave? Catch up on some reading of course!

Nov 12, 1 day agoSomething to read before your gap year project.

So you have made your decision and taken the plunge! You’re off on a gap year to Africa to work with us on animal conservation project. It’s been something you have been looking forward to for years: you’ve chosen your gap year project; you’ve had your inoculations, bought your backpack and booked your seat. But you still have a couple of weeks before you leave and the excitement is really getting to you! What can you

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/something-to-read-before-your-gap-year-project/#sthash.QHiK3Y1U.dpuf
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Elephant Gap Year - You'll Never Forget | Worldwide Experience

Elephant Gap Year - You'll Never Forget | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
African elephants are the largest land animals on Earth and working with them on a gap year project is an unforgettable experience.
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African elephants are the largest land animals on Earth. They can live for up to 70 years and form close-knit groups that are dominated by a matriarch. They are larger than their Asian cousins and can be identified by bigger ears. These ears radiate heat to help keep the huge animals cool. In the 1970s and 1980s, the ivory trade began to devastate elephant populations in Africa as the giant mammals were killed for their tusks. After the trade in ivory was banned in 1989, depleted populations began to recover and now they are competing in some areas with humans for food and land.

African elephants in zoos have reportedly shown symptoms of depression. The first African elephant to be taken to London Zoo, in the 1860s, was called Jumbo, and he posed problems for his keepers, who tried to keep him happy and amused.

Elephants get post traumatic stress too: Calves orphaned by the killing of their parents are haunted by grief decades later; when sounds of elephants, both familiar and unfamiliar, were played to a particular herd the elephants who had no experience of mass culls heard the unfamiliar call and bunched together defensively as expected, however, the elephants who had experienced grief didn’t know what to do.

Members of one of our gap year projects are discovering, during their work, that the old adage that “Elephants never forget” is true. Particularly so when it comes to death. These impressive creatures grieve like humans, shedding tears and taking part in rituals to ‘bury’ bodies.  And the damaging effects of grief from death – especially of a parent – stay with them for decades

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/elephant-gap-year-youll-never-forget/#sthash.GkZUCSlT.dpuf

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Gap Year Projects Involving Animals. | Worldwide Experience

Gap Year Projects Involving Animals. | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
If you want to enhance your CV then gap year projects involving volunteering with animals make an excellent choice.
WorldWideExperience's insight:

Not only will it look good on your CV but it will change your life!

Often, an added bonus to taking part in one of our many gap year projects is how good it will look on your C.V, especially if you choose to go down the volunteering route. Many employers are looking for something that will set you apart from other candidates and being able to chat about your time spent volunteering with animals on the other side of the world will make for great interview conversation.

One of the reasons that a volunteering gap year looks so good on a C.V. is the associated skills that go along with it. You’ll get the chance to build, teach and coach on a daily basis acquiring skills that will benefit you in any walk of life. Having a volunteer project on a university application is equally useful and can make you stand out to get the place you want.

Others take years out from their established careers, some looking for a change of direction in life and some simply taking a break. These volunteers can add a huge amount to any volunteering program with their extra experiences in the world of work and at WWE welcome this particular kind of volunteer.

Whatever your choice we know that you will return to your home after a gap year spent with us in Africa, helping with one of our many projects, a different person. We look forward to seeing you! You will be astonished, during your time with us, just how much you will have learnt about both the work we do and about yourself.

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/gap-year-projects-involving-animals/#sthash.4t0qfcGP.dpuf
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How to organise your gap year. | Worldwide Experience

How to organise your gap year. | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
Making sure that you are properly equipped before you start your gap year project is vital if you are volunteering with animals.
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The African continent is an extremely popular option when it comes to choosing a gap year. There is a good deal to do in Africa, with many conservation projects like ours to keep you occupied. When it comes to selecting a gap year project people always seem to be inclined to select a destination by activities based on their interests at home. For instance, if they have an interest in animals, there is a wide range of activities in South Africa and Namibia, from Wildlife conservation, to volunteering with animals projects. - See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/how-to-organise-your-gap-year/#sthash.gZiOLMjU.dpuf

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A gap year mystery solved? | Worldwide Experience

A gap year mystery solved? | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
How the zebra got its stripes is no longer a mystery to those who have taken part in a gap year project on the Kariega Game Reserve.
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So is the mystery really solved....read more to find out!

The theory, in the press, comes from U.S. researchers who looked for evidence to back up the various explanations for how the zebra got its stripes.

The idea that they act as camouflage by making the animals harder to spot in constantly changing woodland light was quickly discounted because zebras spend much of their time out in the open. Another popular theory is that the stripes dazzle predators and so make it more difficult for them to judge their prey’s size and speed.

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/a-gap-year-mystery-solved/#sthash.f1Dqw35C.dpuf

The theory, in the press, comes from U.S. researchers who looked for evidence to back up the various explanations for how the zebra got its stripes.

The idea that they act as camouflage by making the animals harder to spot in constantly changing woodland light was quickly discounted because zebras spend much of their time out in the open. Another popular theory is that the stripes dazzle predators and so make it more difficult for them to judge their prey’s size and speed.

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/a-gap-year-mystery-solved/#sthash.f1Dqw35C.dpuf

The theory, in the press, comes from U.S. researchers who looked for evidence to back up the various explanations for how the zebra got its stripes.

The idea that they act as camouflage by making the animals harder to spot in constantly changing woodland light was quickly discounted because zebras spend much of their time out in the open. Another popular theory is that the stripes dazzle predators and so make it more difficult for them to judge their prey’s size and speed.

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/a-gap-year-mystery-solved/#sthash.f1Dqw35C.dpuf
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How To Book Your Next Plane Ticket To Get The Best Deal

How To Book Your Next Plane Ticket To Get The Best Deal | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it

You already know that you should be booking your plane ticket 54 days before take-off (if all else fails, you should usually book between 104 to 29 days pre-trip).

 

And while that's all fine and good, there are various nitty-gritty details you should be paying attention to when buying that ticket -- like day of flight and where to book. Luckily, the experts seem to agree on a few key points.


Via Wendy Forbes
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Great tips.

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A gap year to make your mark with the Masai Mara. | Worldwide Experience

A gap year to make your mark with the Masai Mara. | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
Volunteering with animals is a great way to make your mark in a gap year especially in the Masai Mara Big Cat Monitoring & Wildlife Conservation project.
WorldWideExperience's insight:

This is one of the most unusual and rewarding gap year projects.

Situated on the equator on Africa’s east coast, Kenya offers beautiful landscapes, amazing wildlife, with an ethnic diversity that has produced a vibrant culture; this makes it an exciting and life-changing place to take part in any one of a number of gap year projects. This particular project is situated in the newly established Mara Naboisho Conservancy, in the heart of the Masai Mara eco system and just north of the National Reserve. This conservancy area is geographically linked with a number of conservancies as well as the Masai Mara National Reserve, encouraging wildlife to move freely over huge areas.

You will be able to take part in Lion research and monitoring and diverse data collection guided by experienced field staff; this is particularly exciting during the months of July-October during the Great Migration. You will learn from experienced Masai guides about life in the African bush and work alongside local Masai expert instructors in training and educating students from the surrounding Masai community to be safari guides. So assisting in efforts to empower the local Masai communities to value their environment, through conservation education. What more can you ask from a gap year?

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/a-gap-year-to-make-your-mark-with-the-masai-mara/#sthash.Gr2x5Ga7.dpuf

Situated on the equator on Africa’s east coast, Kenya offers beautiful landscapes, amazing wildlife, with an ethnic diversity that has produced a vibrant culture; this makes it an exciting and life-changing place to take part in any one of a number of gap year projects. This particular project is situated in the newly established Mara Naboisho Conservancy, in the heart of the Masai Mara eco system and just north of the National Reserve. This conservancy area is geographically linked with a number of conservancies as well as the Masai Mara National Reserve, encouraging wildlife to move freely over huge areas.

You will be able to take part in Lion research and monitoring and diverse data collection guided by experienced field staff; this is particularly exciting during the months of July-October during the Great Migration. You will learn from experienced Masai guides about life in the African bush and work alongside local Masai expert instructors in training and educating students from the surrounding Masai community to be safari guides. So assisting in efforts to empower the local Masai communities to value their environment, through conservation education. What more can you ask from a gap year?

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/a-gap-year-to-make-your-mark-with-the-masai-mara/#sthash.Gr2x5Ga7.dpuf
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Gap year projects with cheetahs | Worldwide Experience

Gap year projects with cheetahs | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
If you are looking for a Gap Year Project that involves volunteering with animals then this project with cheetahs is ideal.
WorldWideExperience's insight:

Cheetahs are not the first animal that springs to mind for a gap year experience but if you are looking for a very different gap year volunteering with animals this is the one for you.

If you are planning a gap year and have always had a passion for the fastest cat in the world and you want to get close to them then the Hoedspruit cheetah project is the one for you! You will be able to get involved in various aspects of animal rehabilitation at both the Endangered Species Sanctuary and the Big Five Game Reserve. The Hoedspruit cheetah project at the Endangered Species Centre deals with sick, orphaned and breeding cheetah as well as the endangered king cheetah. All of our gap year projects volunteers will have the chance to get involved with the animals rehabilitation, which also entails feeding the animals at least twice a week.

The Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre is situated in the heart of the Limpopo Province in South Africa, and the centre itself is surrounded by one of South Africa’s premier Big Five Game Reserves, which makes the Hoedspruit cheetah project one of our most wide-ranging conservation volunteering experiences. The closest town is Hoedspruit, which is approximately 25km from the reserve.

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/gap-year-projects-with-cheetahs/#sthash.DxIYA5xm.dpuf

If you are planning a gap year and have always had a passion for the fastest cat in the world and you want to get close to them then the Hoedspruit cheetah project is the one for you! You will be able to get involved in various aspects of animal rehabilitation at both the Endangered Species Sanctuary and the Big Five Game Reserve. The Hoedspruit cheetah project at the Endangered Species Centre deals with sick, orphaned and breeding cheetah as well as the endangered king cheetah. All of our gap year projects volunteers will have the chance to get involved with the animals rehabilitation, which also entails feeding the animals at least twice a week.

The Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre is situated in the heart of the Limpopo Province in South Africa, and the centre itself is surrounded by one of South Africa’s premier Big Five Game Reserves, which makes the Hoedspruit cheetah project one of our most wide-ranging conservation volunteering experiences. The closest town is Hoedspruit, which is approximately 25km from the reserve.

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/gap-year-projects-with-cheetahs/#sthash.DxIYA5xm.dpuf
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Gap year volunteer work with animals in Croatia. | Worldwide Experience

Gap year volunteer work with animals in Croatia. | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
Rewilding Europe is an exciting new activity in the field of animal conservation. If you are interested in volunteer work with animals then this is for you.
WorldWideExperience's insight:

This is one of the most unusual gap year projects...

Linden Tree Retreat & Ranch (LT) is the only genuine working guest ranch in Croatia, surrounded by 2 million acres of UNESCO protected pristine wilderness. Intimate and very private, the guest ranch offers a huge range of the very best eco-adventures.

All areas of conservation are covered during your experience. As a conservation volunteer you will assist in the ongoing conservation projects that take place in the area and your research will be used in making important conservation decisions for the area of Velebit.

During your volunteer work with animals you may have the opportunity to experience;

Wildlife watching for species including brown bear, Eurasian lynx, Balkan chamois, red and roe deer and if lucky Grey wolfBird watching for iconic species such as Golden eagle, capercaillie, Griffon vulture and a various types of owl and woodpeckerWolf howling at nightWildlife tracking, monitoring and spoor identificationOutdoor survival skills including foraging for foodStar gazing / AstronomyWildlife watching hide construction

Bozidar Yerkovich founded Linden Tree in 2008. The ranch was born from a dream to build a sustainable wilderness retreat that demonstrates and respects the land, people and wildlife of Velebit. The Yerkovich family now live in, own and manage Linden Tree from where they primarily operate horseback riding and nature tourism activities.

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/gap-year-volunteeer-work-with-animals-in-croatia/#sthash.1Aj8btwa.dpuf

Linden Tree Retreat & Ranch (LT) is the only genuine working guest ranch in Croatia, surrounded by 2 million acres of UNESCO protected pristine wilderness. Intimate and very private, the guest ranch offers a huge range of the very best eco-adventures.

All areas of conservation are covered during your experience. As a conservation volunteer you will assist in the ongoing conservation projects that take place in the area and your research will be used in making important conservation decisions for the area of Velebit.

During your volunteer work with animals you may have the opportunity to experience;

Wildlife watching for species including brown bear, Eurasian lynx, Balkan chamois, red and roe deer and if lucky Grey wolfBird watching for iconic species such as Golden eagle, capercaillie, Griffon vulture and a various types of owl and woodpeckerWolf howling at nightWildlife tracking, monitoring and spoor identificationOutdoor survival skills including foraging for foodStar gazing / AstronomyWildlife watching hide construction

Bozidar Yerkovich founded Linden Tree in 2008. The ranch was born from a dream to build a sustainable wilderness retreat that demonstrates and respects the land, people and wildlife of Velebit. The Yerkovich family now live in, own and manage Linden Tree from where they primarily operate horseback riding and nature tourism activities.

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/gap-year-volunteeer-work-with-animals-in-croatia/#sthash.1Aj8btwa.dpuf
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Elephants care about each other. | Worldwide Experience

Elephants care about each other. | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
On the Kariega Game Reserve gap year volunteers have learned a great deal about the social life of elephants.
WorldWideExperience's insight:

Did you know that elephants "talk" to each other with little chirping sounds? No?  Me neither..but now I do.

Elephants care about each other and here on the Kariega Game Reserve we care about elephants. Recent research has shown that elephants comfort distressed members of their group with reassuring trunk touches and sounds that could be the equivalent of a human soothing a baby, scientists have revealed. It is the first clear evidence of elephants displaying ‘consolation’ behaviour, previously only demonstrated in great apes, dogs and some crow species. Researchers recorded instances when one of the animals was distressed or frightened, for example by a snake rustling in the grass, a passing dog, or an unfriendly elephant. Typically, when this happened a nearby elephant would walk over and gently touch its upset colleague with its trunk, or put its trunk in the other animal’s mouth. - See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/elephants-care-about-each-other/#sthash.NsszA1AA.dpuf eleElephants care about each other and here on the Kariega Game Reserve we care about elephants. Recent research has shown that elephants comfort distressed members of their group with reassuring trunk touches and sounds that could be the equivalent of a human soothing a baby, scientists have revealed. It is the first clear evidence of elephants displaying ‘consolation’ behaviour, previously only demonstrated in great apes, dogs and some crow species. Researchers recorded instances when one of the animals was distressed or frightened, for example by a snake rustling in the grass, a passing dog, or an unfriendly elephant. Typically, when this happened a nearby elephant would walk over and gently touch its upset colleague with its trunk, or put its trunk in the other animal’s mouth. - See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/elephants-care-about-each-other/#sthash.NsszA1AA.dpufel

Elephants care about each other and here on the Kariega Game Reserve we care about elephants. Recent research has shown that elephants comfort distressed members of their group with reassuring trunk touches and sounds that could be the equivalent of a human soothing a baby, scientists have revealed. It is the first clear evidence of elephants displaying ‘consolation’ behaviour, previously only demonstrated in great apes, dogs and some crow species. Researchers recorded instances when one of the animals was distressed or frightened, for example by a snake rustling in the grass, a passing dog, or an unfriendly elephant. Typically, when this happened a nearby elephant would walk over and gently touch its upset colleague with its trunk, or put its trunk in the other animal’s mouth.

The ‘trunk in the mouth’ gesture is the elephant equivalent of a handshake or hug. It may be sending a signal of ‘I’m here to help you, not hurt you’.

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/elephants-care-about-each-other/#sthash.NsszA1AA.dpuf

Elephants care about each other and here on the Kariega Game Reserve we care about elephants. Recent research has shown that elephants comfort distressed members of their group with reassuring trunk touches and sounds that could be the equivalent of a human soothing a baby, scientists have revealed. It is the first clear evidence of elephants displaying ‘consolation’ behaviour, previously only demonstrated in great apes, dogs and some crow species. Researchers recorded instances when one of the animals was distressed or frightened, for example by a snake rustling in the grass, a passing dog, or an unfriendly elephant. Typically, when this happened a nearby elephant would walk over and gently touch its upset colleague with its trunk, or put its trunk in the other animal’s mouth.

The ‘trunk in the mouth’ gesture is the elephant equivalent of a handshake or hug. It may be sending a signal of ‘I’m here to help you, not hurt you’.

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/elephants-care-about-each-other/#sthash.NsszA1AA.dpuf
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Mobile Apps for Cancer Patients

Mobile Apps for Cancer Patients | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
I did some research, asked some patients, and read a lot of reviews to get an idea of which mobile apps were helpful for chronic cancer patients.

Via Alex Butler
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Can only be good.

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How zebras use their stripes. | Worldwide Experience

How zebras use their stripes. | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
Zebras and their stripes are often discussed at our Kariega Game Reserve by students spending a gap year in Africa.
WorldWideExperience's insight:
Last year researchers from Lund University in Sweden argued that the characteristic markings on zebras are there to keep horse flies at bay. They said that the stripes, which are unique to each animal, are unappetising to the hungry pests, which have a nasty bite and spread lethal blood diseases. The reason they find the stripes so unattractive is because they reflect light in a certain way. Horse flies, it turns out, prefer the ‘flat’ light produced by darker coats. - See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/how-zebras-use-their-stripes/#sthash.pLUBjDDG.dpuf

Last year researchers from Lund University in Sweden argued that the characteristic markings on zebras are there to keep horse flies at bay. They said that the stripes, which are unique to each animal, are unappetising to the hungry pests, which have a nasty bite and spread lethal blood diseases. The reason they find the stripes so unattractive is because they reflect light in a certain way. Horse flies, it turns out, prefer the ‘flat’ light produced by darker coats.

Last year researchers from Lund University in Sweden argued that the characteristic markings on zebras are there to keep horse flies at bay. They said that the stripes, which are unique to each animal, are unappetising to the hungry pests, which have a nasty bite and spread lethal blood diseases. The reason they find the stripes so unattractive is because they reflect light in a certain way. Horse flies, it turns out, prefer the ‘flat’ light produced by darker coats. - See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/how-zebras-use-their-stripes/#sthash.pLUBjDDG.dpuf

The mystery which baffled Charles Darwin as to why zebras have black-and-white stripes  has finally been solved – its to scare away hungry predators and insects. Scientists from Royal Holloway, University of London and the University of Queensland used computer models in an attempt to test their theory. The stripes don’t just confuse big predators like lions – pests and flies are affected too. The highly visible oriented stripes on a zebra’s flank and the narrower vertical stripes on its back and neck give unexpected motion signals that confuse viewers, particularly in a herd of zebras.

Humans and many animals have something known as a ‘motion detection mechanisms’ which processes the direction in which something is moving. The markings work as an optical illusion that conceals a zebra’s movements and protects it from being attacked.

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/how-zebras-use-their-stripes/#sthash.pLUBjDDG.dpuf
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Apple reportedly hires sleep expert for iWatch team

Apple reportedly hires sleep expert for iWatch team | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
It’s looking more and more as if the iWatch will be geared towards activity tracking, with a new report that Apple has hired an expert on sleep research to work on the project.

Via Alex Butler
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Sounds like a great trial!

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Denise Silber's curator insight, February 6, 3:16 AM

Is Apple too secretive or is this just normal business practice?.

 
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So much to do to help. | Worldwide Experience

So much to do to help. | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
Gap year projects in Africa are an opportunity to provide comfortable living conditions for others or to help in volunteer work with animals.
WorldWideExperience's insight:

You can take part in volunteering with animals or working with the local community,whatever you choose it will make a real difference.

You can choose your levels of involvement depending on your skills and personality. If you do not mind working outside you can take part in volunteer work with animals or plant crops alongside other villagers - See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/so-much-to-do-to-help/#sthash.2Co3KcSx.dpufGap year projects in Africa are an opportunity to provide comfortable living conditions for others. Your volunteer work in Africa can be a two weeks experience or as long as six months. You can choose your levels of involvement depending on your skills and personality. If you do not mind working outside you can take part in volunteer work with animals or plant crops alongside other villagers - See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/so-much-to-do-to-help/#sthash.2Co3KcSx.dpufGap year projects in Africa are an opportunity to provide comfortable living conditions for others. Your volunteer work in Africa can be a two weeks experience or as long as six months. You can choose your levels of involvement depending on your skills and personality. If you do not mind working outside you can take part in volunteer work with animals or plant crops alongside other villagers - See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/so-much-to-do-to-help/#sthash.2Co3KcSx.dpuf
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How wildlife tourism and zoos can protect animals in the wild

How wildlife tourism and zoos can protect animals in the wild | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it

"Fewer than 2,000 orangutans are left living in the wild in the Malaysian state of Sarawak, with nearly all truly wild ones confined to a remote site on the Indonesian border. It’s why thousands of tourists and local Sarawak people come to places like this – the popular Semenggoh Nature Reserve – to see orangutans semi-wild in a reserve or captive in a rehabilitation centre.

 

Our new research has found that some 40% of the tourists to Semenggoh said they had come to Sarawak primarily to see orangutans. We also discovered something more surprising: that international tourists visiting Semenggoh said they would be happy not to see these wild orangutans, just so long as the orangutans were being conserved.


This finding – published in the latest edition of the journal Conservation & Society – is significant for global conservation efforts, because it suggests that the wildlife experience can be separated from the wild life. And that could benefit both tourists and animals still living in the wild."


Via Tourism Australia Global Insights
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Animal conservation at it's best...working for both tourism and animal welfare.

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Video: Tigers Draw Tourists and Support for India’s Parks

Video: Tigers Draw Tourists and Support for India’s Parks | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it

Tiger tourism in India helps visitors find a personal connection with the big cats while raising money for tiger conservation. There's hope that responsible practices can keep the cats safe and un-stressed during tours.


Via Wendy Forbes
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I completely agree.

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Volunteering with animals on Kariega | Worldwide Experience

Volunteering with animals on Kariega | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
Kudu antelopes are great survivors on the Kariega Game Reserve where they are part of our volunteering with animals projects.
WorldWideExperience's insight:
This is the story of how a quick thinking Kudu antelope tricked his way out of a hyena ambush by loosing himself in a herd of zebra!This is the story of how a quick-thinking kudu tricked his way out of a hyena ambush by losing himself in a herd of zebra. The lone bull greater kudu – which is a large species of antelope – had been drinking at a waterhole when he was surrounded by 14 hyenas who had been hunting nearby. After a three hour standoff and with his chances of survival looking slim, the kudu noticed a herd of zebra swimming across the waterhole in his direction, giving him the perfect opportunity to lose himself in the crowd. - See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/volunteering-with-animals-on-kariega/#sthash.21ZkI422.dpufThis is the story of how a quick-thinking kudu tricked his way out of a hyena ambush by losing himself in a herd of zebra. The lone bull greater kudu – which is a large species of antelope – had been drinking at a waterhole when he was surrounded by 14 hyenas who had been hunting nearby. After a three hour standoff and with his chances of survival looking slim, the kudu noticed a herd of zebra swimming across the waterhole in his direction, giving him the perfect opportunity to lose himself in the crowd. - See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/volunteering-with-animals-on-kariega/#sthash.21ZkI422.dpuf
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A Colobus Monkey and a Gap Year. - Worldwide Experience | Worldwide Experience

A Colobus Monkey and a Gap Year. - Worldwide Experience | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
Thinking about a gap year project? Kenya’s Colobus Conservation Monkey Sanctuary could be ideal.
WorldWideExperience's insight:

Colobus Monkey sanctuary is a wonderful place to take part in the conservation work with these beautiful little animals.


Gap year projects are, of course, available worldwide, offering a huge range of opportunities. Here at Worldwide Experiences we are proud to say that our projects are very definitely very different!

Take for example, Kenya’s Colobus Conservation Monkey Sanctuary, just an hour south of Mombasa in Kenya, hidden away amongst almost twenty hectares of coastal forest. The Colobus Cottage is an office, research base, information centre, monkey sanctuary and rescue facility, and home for the Colobus conservation staff and volunteers.

Established in January 1997, the conservation sanctuary has made a unique niche in the primate world by developing innovative primate conservation solutions that make an immediate impact. The Colobus sanctuary works hard to conserve the highly endangered Colobus monkey; it also works with other monkey species found in the area. During the years of the conservation sanctuary’s existence it has carried out many research projects that aimed to reduce the impact of human development in the area.

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/a-colobus-monkey-and-a-gap-year/#sthash.ifE3Zwf5.dpuf


Gap year projects are, of course, available worldwide, offering a huge range of opportunities. Here at Worldwide Experiences we are proud to say that our projects are very definitely very different!

Take for example, Kenya’s Colobus Conservation Monkey Sanctuary, just an hour south of Mombasa in Kenya, hidden away amongst almost twenty hectares of coastal forest. The Colobus Cottage is an office, research base, information centre, monkey sanctuary and rescue facility, and home for the Colobus conservation staff and volunteers.

Established in January 1997, the conservation sanctuary has made a unique niche in the primate world by developing innovative primate conservation solutions that make an immediate impact. The Colobus sanctuary works hard to conserve the highly endangered Colobus monkey; it also works with other monkey species found in the area. During the years of the conservation sanctuary’s existence it has carried out many research projects that aimed to reduce the impact of human development in the area.

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/a-colobus-monkey-and-a-gap-year/#sthash.ifE3Zwf5.dpuf
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Tourism Australia’s 8 questions for great content marketing

Tourism Australia’s 8 questions for great content marketing | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
Arguably one of the best exponents of content and social marketing, Tourism Australia shared its strategy for customer engagement with its brand (Australia)

Via Tourism Australia Global Insights
WorldWideExperience's insight:

For me you can't beat dawn at Ayers Rock.

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"Love Every Second and Vivid Sydney": Sydney's winter showcased in tourism campaign

"Love Every Second and Vivid Sydney": Sydney's winter showcased in tourism campaign | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it

"Sydney’s major events momentum continues through the winter months with a wide variety of sporting, stage and cultural experiences set to engage locals, interstate and international visitors, Minister for Tourism and Major Events, George Souris, announced."


Via Julien Dos Reis Pedro
WorldWideExperience's insight:

Sydney has to be one of the most exciting cities that I have visited.

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Gap Year Projects - Game Ranger Training. | Worldwide Experience

Gap Year Projects - Game Ranger Training. | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
If you are interested in volunteer work with animals then game ranger training may be just the gap year project you are looking for.
WorldWideExperience's insight:

If you intend to do something very different during your gap year this could be perfect.

One of our new projects for this year is the Shamwari Conservation Experience: it is a once in a lifetime chance to get behind the scenes and involved with the conservation efforts of the world renowned Shamwari Game Reserve, home to the largest concentration of wildlife in the Eastern and Southern Cape of  Africa.

The course is both intense theory and practical outcomes based experience for participants who either want to pursue a career in field guiding or for those who merely would like to experience a more intense learning curve in regard to the various aspects of being a game ranger. On the reserve there is a dedicated Wildlife Department (including qualified wildlife veterinarians, ecologists and environmentalists) it boasts a breeding centre, a rehabilitation centre, an animal hospital, an
education centre and an anti-poaching unit.

You have to be a minimum of 18 years old and you don’t need any previous experience in the field but you do need to be in possession of a valid driver’s license and most importantly, a passion for conservation all related species such as lions, rhino and elephants.

Candidates who are found to be competent after successfully completing the 60 day course will receive a FGASA level 1 (NQF 2) qualification. Several aspects including PFTC (Professional Firearm Training Council weapon handling, First Aid Level 1, THETA accredited 4X4 driving, snake handling and wine tasting. This will give you a head start on all the necessary qualifications that are required to start a successful career in field guiding.

This is one of those very different gap year projects and one of which we are immensely proud. So, if you would like to have some training in being a game ranger this is your chance!

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/gap-year-projects-game-ranger-training/#sthash.kPv5u8di.dpuf

 

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Rhinos – the mindless slaughter continues. | Worldwide Experience

Rhinos – the mindless slaughter continues. | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
WorldWideExperience's insight:

The South African government, last year, announced plans to deploy armed troops into its wildlife parks in a bid to protect the country’s rhinos from poachers targeting the animals’ famous horns. The plans – which could see helicopter gunships patrol game parks’ skies and soldiers wearing night vision goggles on the ground – were announced as new figures show that more rhinos have been killed in South Africa over the last three years than at any time since the colonial period. . That is where you, as someone taking part in animal volunteer work, can do your bit to help protect the world’s rhino population. As wildlife experts we can safely state that the white and black rhino species are in risk of become severely endangered, in that a tipping point has been reached as more rhinos are now dying than are being born. Here on the Kariega Game Reserve we work tirelessly to look after and protect all of the animals in our care so that the following facts become a thing of the past. In 2012, a total of 588 of the magnificent beasts have been killed in South Africa by poachers working for Far Eastern crime syndicates which sell the animals’ horns for use in traditional medicine.

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Is a snap year the new gap year? | Worldwide Experience

Is a snap year the new gap year? | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
A gap year doesn't have to be twelve months. Even one or two months spent on the Kariega Game Reserve carrying out gap year projects can be very rewarding.
WorldWideExperience's insight:

A wonderful way to enjoy new experiences and to do something worthwhile at the same time.

Often called a mini gap year, or a ‘snap year’ a shorter project can also be a hugely beneficial experience and proves that a gap year most certainly doesn’t have to be a full year. One or two months on a Kariega Game Reserve can be far cheaper than a whole year spent on the beaches of Thailand, Australia and New Zealand and will be infinitely more rewarding - See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/is-a-snap-year-the-new-gap-year/#sthash.JxRgD8MC.dpuf
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Help us to look after our lions. | Worldwide Experience

Help us to look after our lions. | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
The volunteer work with animals we carry out on the Kariega Game Reserve in South Africa is helping to protect the dwindling lion population.
WorldWideExperience's insight:

An article in the press this week emphasised the importance of the work we do in South Africa. The loss of animals such as the lion, rhino, and elephant is a huge problem worldwide. This highlights just how important our work here on the Kariega Game Reserve is. Lion numbers are decreasing in South Africa also, our volunteer work with animals can, and does, make a huge difference in protecting the numbers of these beautiful animals.

Lion numbers are falling not only in South Africa the West African Lion is facing imminent extinction after a ‘catastrophic collapse’ in numbers has left just 400 in the region, a new survey has found.

An article in the press this week emphasised the importance of the work we do in South Africa. The loss of animals such as the lion, rhino, and elephant is a huge problem worldwide. This highlights just how important our work here on the Kariega Game Reserve is. Lion numbers are decreasing in South Africa also, our volunteer work with animals can, and does, make a huge difference in protecting the numbers of these beautiful animals.

 

 

Lion numbers are falling not only in South Africa the West African Lion is facing imminent extinction after a ‘catastrophic collapse’ in numbers has left just 400 in the region, a new survey has found.

- See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/help-us-to-look-after-our-lions/#sthash.nAd7VkaF.dpuf
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The Middle Class Is Steadily Eroding. Just Ask the Business World.

The Middle Class Is Steadily Eroding. Just Ask the Business World. | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it

The post-recession reality is that the customer base for businesses that appeal to the middle class is shrinking as the top tier pulls even further away.

 

Big stores and restaurants are chasing richer customers with a wider offering of high-end goods and services, or focusing on rock-bottom prices to attract the expanding ranks of penny-pinching consumers.



Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
WorldWideExperience's insight:

The only way is up I guess.

 

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Tony Brugman (Bright & Company)'s curator insight, May 3, 4:33 PM

Interesting, but worrisome story earlier in NYT on the shrinking U.S.' Middle Class, and the Way It Affects Businesses.

 

"The top 5 percent of earners accounted for almost 40 percent of personal consumption expenditures in 2012, up from 27 percent in 1992. Largely driven by this increase, consumption among the top 20 percent grew to more than 60 percent over the same period."

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A gap year is not just another notch on your CV. | Worldwide Experience

A gap year is not just another notch on your CV. | Worldwide Experience | AnimalConservation | Scoop.it
A gap year experience can look good on your CV as long as it contributes something of real value - here are some great gap year ideas to consider.
WorldWideExperience's insight:
African volunteering organizations realize that the modern volunteer who is looking for gap year ideas isn’t necessarily going to be attracted by a tent in the jungle. For some people that’s precisely what they’re looking for – and if you are one of them there is ample opportunity to get out on an African safari. On the other hand, after you’ve been doing volunteer teaching, medical assistance or helping conserve African wildlife all day – and you’re tired – it’s quite reasonable to want a shower, a good meal and, when you are ready for it, a comfortable bed. - See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/a-gap-year-is-not-just-another-notch-on-your-cv/#sthash.6KrA0zNi.dpuf

There is so much that you can do during a gap year.....working in animal conservation,helping educate children and much more ...the choice is yours.

African volunteering organizations realize that the modern volunteer who is looking for gap year ideas isn’t necessarily going to be attracted by a tent in the jungle. For some people that’s precisely what they’re looking for – and if you are one of them there is ample opportunity to get out on an African safari. On the other hand, after you’ve been doing volunteer teaching, medical assistance or helping conserve African wildlife all day – and you’re tired – it’s quite reasonable to want a shower, a good meal and, when you are ready for it, a comfortable bed. - See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/a-gap-year-is-not-just-another-notch-on-your-cv/#sthash.6KrA0zNi.dpufAfrican volunteering organizations realize that the modern volunteer who is looking for gap year ideas isn’t necessarily going to be attracted by a tent in the jungle. For some people that’s precisely what they’re looking for – and if you are one of them there is ample opportunity to get out on an African safari. On the other hand, after you’ve been doing volunteer teaching, medical assistance or helping conserve African wildlife all day – and you’re tired – it’s quite reasonable to want a shower, a good meal and, when you are ready for it, a comfortable bed. - See more at: http://www.worldwideexperience.com/a-gap-year-is-not-just-another-notch-on-your-cv/#sthash.6KrA0zNi.dpuf
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