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Tens of thousands of cattle killed in Friday's blizzard, ranchers say

Tens of thousands of cattle killed in Friday's blizzard, ranchers say | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it

Tens of thousands of cattle killed in Friday's blizzard, ranchers say October 08, 2013 7:33 am • Daniel Simmons-Ritchie Journal staff Tens of thousands of cattle lie dead across South Dakota on Monday following a blizzard that could become one of the most costly in the history of the state’s agriculture industry. As state officials spent the day calculating the multi-million dollar impact to the regional economy from Friday's storm, ranchers began digging up hundreds of cattle that are still buried beneath feet of snow. "This is absolutely, totally devastating," said Steve Schell, a 52-year-old rancher from Caputa. "This is horrendous. I mean the death loss of these cows in this country is unbelievable." Schell said he estimated he had lost half of his herd, but it could be far more. He was still struggling to find snow-buried cattle and those that had been pushed miles by winds that gusted at 70 miles per hour on Friday night. Martha Wierzbicki, emergency management director for Butte County, said the trail of carcasses was a gruesome sight across the region. “They’re in the fence line, laying alongside the roads,” she said. “It’s really sickening.” Silvia Christen, executive director of the South Dakota Stockgrowers Association, said most ranchers she had spoken to were reporting that 20 to 50 percent of their herds had been killed. "I have never heard of anything like it," she said. "And none of the ranchers I have talked to can remember anything like it." While South Dakota ranchers are no strangers to blizzards, what made Friday's storm so damaging was how early it arrived in the season. Christen said cattle hadn't yet grown their winter coats to insulate them from freezing wind and snow. In addition, Christen said, during the cold months, ranchers tend to move their cattle to pastures that have more trees and gullies to protect them from storms. Because Friday's storm arrived so early in the year, most ranchers were still grazing their herds on summer pasture, which tend to be more exposed and located farther away from ranch homes. Ultimately, Christen said, she believed that more than 5 percent of the roughly 1.5 million cattle in Western South Dakota had been killed. "It's much higher than that," she said. "But I'm not sure where that number is going to land." Jodie Anderson, executive director of the South Dakota Cattlemen's Association, said the pain for ranchers is now compounded by dysfunction within the federal government. While the government has programs to help ranchers who suffer losses from catastrophic weather events, those programs are in limbo because Congress has failed to pass a farm bill. The legislation is normally passed every five years and controls subsidy and insurance programs for the agriculture industry. Making things worse, because the government is currently in a partial shutdown, ranchers are unable to ask federal officials questions about how they might be reimbursed in the future. "A lot of the government agencies that we would normally be turning to for those answers are furloughed,” she said. “So there's this sort of timing issue that's enhancing the frustration out there in cattle country." The shutdown was caused after House Republicans, including U.S. Rep Kristi Noem, R-S.D., refused to pass a resolution to fund the government unless Democrats weakened or delayed parts of President Obama's 2010 health care overhaul. On Monday, Sen. Tim Johnson, D-S.D., pointed to South Dakota's battered ranchers as another example of why House Republicans needed to continue funding the government without preconditions. "Like the snow storm, the government shutdown is causing major disruptions in people’s lives and every day business," he said in a statement. Whether they are eventually reimbursed for their losses or not, however, ranchers are likely to feel the pain for years. David Uhrig, 31, a rancher in Folsom, said he estimated about 25 percent of his herd had been killed, which meant far fewer calves this spring. “We are looking at years of rebuilding to get back to what we lost,” he said. In the short term, however, Uhrig had far more pressing concerns. Like most ranchers, he spent most of Monday searching his land for stray cattle or sorting out cattle that had drifted into neighboring herds. “It’s not uncommon at this point to find cattle that are five miles from where they should be,” he said. “Which doesn't seem like a lot, but to drift five miles in a storm — that’s a lot.” Dustin Oedekoven, South Dakota’s state veterinarian, said that the next immediate challenge for ranchers would be disposal of carcasses. “That can be a significant source of disease spread, so we want to make sure those carcasses are burned, buried or rendered as quickly as possible,” he said. Oedekoven said disposal was primarily be the responsibility of ranchers themselves. However, the state was also helping ranchers get in touch with haulers that would take carcasses away for rendering. He added that, while the federal government was in poor shape to offer assistance because of the shutdown and a lack of a farm bill, ranchers should thoroughly document all cattle deaths. He said that could include taking photos, collecting cattle tags, or bringing in a veterinarian or farm service provider as an eye witness of deaths. “If you don’t keep good records about your losses you won’t be available for indemnity funds should they become available,” he said.


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Summer Rain Reimer's curator insight, December 8, 2013 1:38 PM

There was a blizzard  in South Dakota. They didn't know about the  storm coming .They left the cattles out over night and it snowed  really bad. The cattles got buried in the snow and they can't get out  because the snow was heavy . Over 10,000 cattles got killed by the blizzard. They hadent grown their winter coats to keep them warm because it takes a long time to grow the winter coats. But the blizzard came to South Dakota early then they expected and that why they had died. cause their coats didnt grow all the way in .

Josh Nelson's curator insight, December 9, 2013 5:16 PM

Cassie Chriswell:

This all took place in South Dakota!  It was a big blizard that cost a lot of money due to all the cattle lost.  Officals say that it is going to be a multi-million dollar loss due to the calculations.  That's not good!  Winds gusted up to and at 70 miles per hour on that Friday night.  It was so bad because most of the cattle hadent grown a there winter fur coat yet.  Most of the cattle got blown away or frozen to death due to the cold weather.   Estimates we made that 1.5 million cattle died in South Dakota due to the biggest blizard.

Connor Emmert's curator insight, December 10, 2013 10:53 AM

This kinda of thing really sucks. but theres really nothing anyone can do. I think maybe having more shelter may have helped though. the damage is in the millions , not to mention the farmers that dont have that kind of insurance. this is just a crappy thing all around

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Swine Product Manager - UK Nationwide - 20698 with Noble Futures | 1401329461

Swine Product Manager - UK Nationwide - 20698 with Noble Futures | 1401329461 | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
Our client a leading nutrition solutions provider is seeking to appoint a Swine Product Manager covering UK, Europe, Middle East and Africa. This exciting new role within the company will be part of the established EMEA marketing team.

Via Cassie Chriswell
Josh Nelson's insight:
Cassie Chriswell: 

The swine product manager works full time and all the time but,  barly ever gets time to take off.  The salary is excellent suprise every time you get paided! They do several things while being in the swine product manager such as being a manager/supevisor, marketing, sales, specialist, and finally a veterinarion.  Most of the time (20-30%) is doing  international travel.   International travel is where you could travel anywhere at any given time!  You could be travaling anywhere!  They have to have at least 5 years of experience in either swine feed or animal health industry to be able to take this job if they ever wanted to do this job!  I dont think i would ever want to take this job because you wouldnt be home that much!   

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Josh Nelson's curator insight, September 13, 2013 12:03 PM

Site with daily ag careers in Europe 

Cassie Chriswell's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:46 PM

The swine product manager works full time.  The salary is excellent renumeration package.  They do several things while being in the swine product manager such as being a manager/ supevisor, marketing, sales, specialist, and finally a veterinarion.  Most of the time (20-30%) is international travel.  They have to have at least 5 years of experience in either swine feed or animal health industry. 

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#FloridaProblems: 7-foot alligator removed from drain pipe; 14,275 nuisance alligator complaints in 2011

#FloridaProblems: 7-foot alligator removed from drain pipe; 14,275 nuisance alligator complaints in 2011 | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it

MERRITT ISLAND, Fla. - Unlike the alligators of urban legend that lurk in Manhattan’s sewers, a real-life reptile took up residence in a drain pipe in an otherwise quiet neighborhood near the Ulamay Wildlife Sanctuary -- belching menacing, rumbling hisses at passers-by.

 

Since December, the alligator inhabited the grated end of a stormwater pipe off Lakewood Circle. And nearby humans feared for the animal’s health and safety.

 

Neighborhood guesstimates of the gator’s length ranged from 4 to 10 feet -- only the fearsome, scaly snout was typically visible, poking out of the pipe. Whatever its length, the toothy reptile apparently was not happy with its living situation.

 

Hours later, the reptile was removed. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officers used plastic piping to coax the 7-foot gator to backpedal -- “he wasn’t at all happy about it,” spokeswoman Joy Hill described -- and the beast was captured soon afterward.

 

The alligator was relocated to a St. Johns River marsh, Hill said.

 

The FWC’s Statewide Nuisance Alligator Program received 14,275 nuisance alligator complaints in 2011, and 6,995 gators were removed...

 (click pic to continue reading)


Via Billy Corben, Cassie Chriswell
Josh Nelson's insight:
Cassie Chriswell: 

This alligator was stuck in a drain pipe in Merritt Island, Florida.  Its not good for the alligators safety or the peoples  safety.  Espeectily for the people that found the animal stuck.    After they caught him they relocated him to St. Johns River Marsh.  Near where the pipe was there was a school.. At the school they had boys that feed it hot dogs and even teased it.  Also they had girls that conducted a prayer service rigth by the pipe where alligator was at.  It was stuck in a drain pipe. It would have been bad if anyone got hurt in the process of getting the animal out! But, luckly nobody was hurt!!

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Angelica D. Ignacio's curator insight, September 25, 2013 11:31 AM

an animal need a safe envirorment it was 4 to 10 feet a snout saw his head poping out of the pipe when they were in the woods hours later the reptile was removed.

Cassie Chriswell's curator insight, September 28, 2013 4:27 PM

The poor alligator was stuck in a drain pipe in Merritt Island, Florida.  Its not good for the alligators safety or the peoples  safety that found him.  After they caught him they relocated him to St. Johns River Marsh.  Near where the pipe was there was a school.. At the school they had boys that feed it hot dogs and even teased it.  Also they had girls that conducted a prayer service rigth by the pipe where alligator was at.  It was stuck in a drain pipe. 

Mark Lindsay's curator insight, February 25, 1:52 PM

Another reason to call Mark Lindsay & Son Plumbing & Heating

(973) 728-8900

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Genetically Modified Food Isn't As Scary As You Think - PolicyMic

Genetically Modified Food Isn't As Scary As You Think - PolicyMic | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
PolicyMic Genetically Modified Food Isn't As Scary As You Think PolicyMic While Washington State has been in the news more for one of its initiatives which passed last year, another recent legislative battle has caught the attention of some of the...

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Cassie Chriswell: 

This article is about people responce to GMO's and if they are good or not in there eyes.  GMO's  stand for genetically modified organisms.  When you modifie food that is bacially the job that the GMO's in food do.  It could harm animals and even humans if they have to much GMO stuff in it.. But at the same time it could save a person's life.  Bacially all they do it to help grow and reproduce in the food industry. it helps us (humans) by helping us grow crops!  

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Jacob Voorhies's curator insight, October 15, 2013 12:42 PM

people are being fraked out over genetically modified foods. but so far there isnt enough evidence to prove that these GMO's are even harmful to humans. all they do is help the crop grow and help protct against pestisides

 

Almedin Cajlak's curator insight, November 5, 2013 4:27 PM

Wow! I didn't know about this one. After reading this article, I feel like unsafe because the farmers didn't do their job to protect their food crops. It is kinda scary because the rat thing will strike them that you can't see because they're tiny. Having modified food causing tumors which is really scary because I feel like they should do their job to see what happend to their food crops they grew on the farms.

Sydney Bolyard's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:28 AM

-       In this particular article, there is a “see-saw” discussion, per say, as to whether or not GMOs are safe or not. As far as I am concerned, I was under the impression that genetically modified foods are processed and are questionable when it comes to consumption. It is mentioned in the article that an individual has gathered information that it is possible GMOs cause cancer. It is not said whether that is true or not, but anything is possible. I, myself, prefer organic produce because I know it has not undergone any ‘voodoo’ production.

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Five Species You Thought Were Endangered That Really Aren't (Including the ... - Slate Magazine (blog)

Five Species You Thought Were Endangered That Really Aren't (Including the ... - Slate Magazine (blog) | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
Slate Magazine (blog)
Five Species You Thought Were Endangered That Really Aren't (Including the ...
Josh Nelson's insight:

Cassie Chriswell: 

 

Humpback Whales- 

- estimated at 125,000, and today they probably number about 80,000 individuals.

 

Praying Mantises- 

- illegall to kill then in the United States

- more than 20 species are found in North America 

 

Clouded Leopared-

- not a leopared at all, but it is the smallest of the big cat family

 

Komado Dragons- 

- only 5,000 left on tiny little islands

 

Polar Bears- 

- some people say that it is due to global warming that they became extinct

- only 25,000 polar bears left worldwide 

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Trevor Lakes's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:22 AM

this is awesome. i thought the polar bear was almost extinct. they are my favorite animal. the are beautiful and also ferouciuos.

 

Summer Rain Reimer's curator insight, December 8, 2013 1:30 PM

humpback whales really arnt endangered because of the save the whales . their speices is widely misunderstood.

praying mantises are not at all indagered their are more than 20 diffrent species of mantises. 

clouded leopards thier is no data saying that their species is in decline . we dont here about them cause their almost the last thing on the cat chart , that why poeple think they are endangered.

komodo dragon - they can be come endagered if we keep hunting on them but their not endagered yet . their are about 5,000 wild one spreaded around multiple island.

polar bears their are about 25,000 polar bears worldwide and their are about 19 subpopulation of polar bears .people think their endagered cause of global warming .

Olivia Haltom's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:09 AM

i thought it was intresting to find out these animals really arent endangered.

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Are gassy cattle a bigger problem than US government thought?

Are gassy cattle a bigger problem than US government thought? | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
Cattle generate twice as much methane as the EPA supposed, according to a new report. The study's findings may also change assumptions about the safety of extracting natural gas, which consists primarily of methane.

Via Sarah Glauber
Josh Nelson's insight:

Cassie Chriswell: 

I think that the gassy cattle is a big problem.  According to the report, human-caused (anthropogenic) methane emissions account for almost 65% of the global methane budget, most of that comes from cattle.  This report finds that ruminant animals generate twice as much methane than previously thought.  Can you believe that anthropogenic methane emissions for all sources were 2.7 times greater in Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas, making up almost 30% of the atmospheric carbon released by the natural-gas industry.  The hope was that natural gas would help reduce the greenhouse-gas emissions vs. coal! 

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Sarah Glauber's curator insight, December 4, 2013 6:08 PM

This sounds lik a problem to me.  There really isn't anything you can do to stop this though.  You can't really stop cows from being gassy.

Trevor Boyne's curator insight, December 6, 2013 8:34 AM

These cattle are creating double the amount of methane in which we thought was being created. Cattle make up 24 percent of the nations emmisions of methane. With over 90 thousand cattle, that makes up for a lot of methane. In fact they are the leading cause of human caused methane in the nation.

Connor Emmert's curator insight, December 10, 2013 11:07 AM

I think that methane is a problem but if its coming from the cattle then its natural and its sopposed to be there. and the greenhouse effect is actually pretty nice. I mean indiana is 10 degrees right now and well warmness is ok and if its natual then its sopposed to be there. Just learn to cop with it 

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Big Pork Deal Comes Amid Friction Over Livestock Drug – Utne Altwire

Big Pork Deal Comes Amid Friction Over Livestock Drug – Utne Altwire | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
The proposed .7 billion sale of Smithfield Foods, America’s largest pork producer, to China’s biggest meat processing company comes amid significant trade friction between the two countries over meat and livestock.China bans ractopamine, a...
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Dairy farmers use beer by product to feed livestock, upping milk yields

Dairy farmers use beer by product to feed livestock, upping milk yields | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
Latest Kenyan farmer & farming news featuring Agriscience news, Agronomic, and Market trends.
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Kayleigh Edwards's curator insight, December 6, 2013 9:39 AM

i think this is a very interesting topic and a unique tactic to increase production. 

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The Foodie Farmer: Top 10 Annoying Words About Agriculture

The Foodie Farmer: Top 10 Annoying Words About Agriculture | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
Josh Nelson's insight:

AS I look back and the conversations I have had and the things I have read, I can relate to this article far to much and beleive that there are a couple of those words that I would despise. 

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Ghana Business News » Ghana launches National Livestock Policy ...

Ghana Business News » Ghana launches National Livestock Policy ... | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
Cattle Dr Ahmed Yakubu Alhassan, Deputy Minister for Food and Agriculture in-charge of Crops, on Tuesday said Ghana is still a net importer of livestock products as it is yet to meet the growing demand for animal protein.
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Activist Post: Antibiotics In Livestock Strengthening Superbugs

Activist Post: Antibiotics In Livestock Strengthening Superbugs | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
Antibiotics In Livestock Strengthening Superbugs http://t.co/VFmAGtkFym
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OSU to close swine barn, sell off its hogs - Capital Press

OSU to close swine barn, sell off its hogs - Capital Press | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
OSU to close swine barn, sell off its hogs Capital Press They've been used for livestock evaluation and basic animal science courses, sold to 4-H and FFA members who raise pigs for county fair projects, and even entered in the Oregon State Fair by...
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Almedin Cajlak's curator insight, November 5, 2013 4:23 PM

This article is talking about they are closing the swine barn and  selling the hogs to buy the repiars what they need for their barn. They wanted to sell the hogs so they can get more money to buy the repiars for their barn. They want the barn to be safe so the animals can live there safely. 

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Animal species discovered in 2013

From a legless lizard to a new rat in a remote forest, here's a look at some new species discovered so far this year.
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Gerardo Nieves's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:04 PM

Gerardo Nieves 

"Animal species Discovered in 2013"

news.msn.com

 Scoop it.com      There were 6 new species discovered in this new year of 2013,. Alot of warm blooded animals and 2 mammals. These new animals are very awesome and cool looking. Theres a new reptile, koala looking animal, rat, fish, shark, and bird. They have all been discovered this year and they are new.     The first one is a new species of reptile without legs. You might think its a snake but, its not. Its like a worm snake with scales. Its resally cool. The second is a thing called an Ollingto, its climbs trees , jumps from tree to tree, and its ki'nda like a cat+dog+ bear so its a = Catdogbear. The 3rd is a new shrew. ITS SUPER STRONG AND CAN MOVE LONG AND STUFF AND CAN LIFT MANY TIMES ITS WEIGHT. 4rth is a new shark. Its a cool shark. Its long and looks awesome. This shark can survive in low oxygen levels by increasing/sending all the blood flow to its barin and shutting down any non-function parts of its body that ts doesnt need to use. 5th is a new shark that weighs 400lbs and is at least 11ft long. 6th is a bird but, nobody really cares about birds so you know. 
Almedin Cajlak's curator insight, October 23, 2013 10:06 AM

Interesting to know. I haven't heard of it. I didn't know that the lizard don't have legs. They are a lizard, but they looks like a snake. That's how they are legless because it's the same body as the snake.

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Fall Silage Harvest Of Experimental Forage Blends

Fall Silage Harvest Of Experimental Forage Blends | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
The fall forage harvest has started at South Dakota State University (SDSU) evaluating unique forage blends. Forage production continues to be an important part of South Dakota livestock production.
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Interesting, and somthing that I dont think I would have put together, but makes a lot of sense.  I want more information

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State Fair watching closely for signs of swine flu - Minnesota Public Radio

State Fair watching closely for signs of swine flu - Minnesota Public Radio | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
State Fair watching closely for signs of swine flu
Minnesota Public Radio
A strain of swine influenza swept through fairs last summer sickening 309 people in a dozen states, including Minnesota. One person died from the new virus.

Via Cassie Chriswell
Josh Nelson's insight:
Cassie Chriswell: 

I think that it is crazy that last year the swine flu  sickened 309 people in a dozen different places. Only  one person died from the new virus.  I think that it is good that only one perosn died since it was a new virus.  That is very sad that someone died from the new virus.  If the swine had a temperature then the swine will leave right away so none of the otherones could possible get what that pig has.  It is commonly known as H3N2v, and it is at the top of the list these days.  They even started putting up signs such as one that say " Please wash your hads after visiting the animals!"  They also had several other signs out in several differnt places to remind you to wash your hands after you pet/went into the pig barn/swine barn. 

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Cassie Chriswell's curator insight, September 28, 2013 4:04 PM

I think that it is crazy that last year is sickened 309 people in a dozen different places.  One person died from the new virus.  That is very sad that someone died from the new virus.  If the swine has a temperature then the swine will leave right away so none of the otherones could possible get what that pig has.  It is commonly known as H3N2v, and it is at the top of the list these days.  They even started putting up signs such as one that say " Please wash your hads after visiting the animals!"

Sam Godby's curator insight, October 11, 2013 9:07 AM

I think it is very interesting how influenza can be passed from a pig to a human.  There really isn't anything that people can do to prevent this because they most likely figure out that the animal is sick after it is already to late.  At least the official veterinarian of the Minnesota State fair is doing his best to prevent things. 

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Leopard print clothing banned at zoo as it 'confuses animals' - Telegraph

Leopard print clothing banned at zoo as it 'confuses animals' - Telegraph | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
A wildlife park has banned visitors from wearing leopard print clothing because it is confusing the animals.

Via Marissa, Cassie Chriswell
Josh Nelson's insight:
Cassie Chriswell: 

At a zoo there is ZERO tolerance policy on wearing any animal print.  The animal print causes the animals to try and communicate with the person wearing the clothing.  That is just kind of weird for animals and hunmans to communcate! People that are wearing the animal print clothing could come face- to- face with animals thinking you are another animal. Witch is not a good thin.. It could become deadly.  If you wear the animal print you could come face- to- face with many animals such as the following,  white rhinos, giraffes, flimingoes, waterbuck, and several other animals at the zoo.  There are several other animal print that you cant wear.  You cant wear zebra pint, giraffe print, leperad print, cheetah print,  tiger print, spotted hyena, striped hyena, and finally african wild dog. 

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Kennedy Williamson's comment, September 25, 2013 11:30 AM
Animal Print clothing got banned in Chessington World of Adventures Resort. Animals would try to communicate with the people wearing those prints. Those animals would then scare away those people. This involves animals because they get scared as well as the humans. They also get confused.
Cassie Chriswell's curator insight, September 28, 2013 4:41 PM

At a zoo there is ZERO tolerance policy on wearing any animal print.  The animal print causes the animals to try and communicate with the person wearing the clothing.  People that are wearing the animal print clothing could come face- to- face with animals thinking you are another animal.  If you wear the animal print you could come face- to- face with white rhinos, giraffes, flimingoes, waterbuck, and several other animals at the zoo.  There are several other animal print that you cant wear.  You cant wear zebra pint, giraffe print, leperad print, cheetah print,  tiger print, spotted hyena, striped hyena, and finally african wild dog. 

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Tens of thousands of cattle killed in Friday's blizzard, ranchers say

Tens of thousands of cattle killed in Friday's blizzard, ranchers say | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it

Tens of thousands of cattle killed in Friday's blizzard, ranchers say October 08, 2013 7:33 am • Daniel Simmons-Ritchie Journal staff Tens of thousands of cattle lie dead across South Dakota on Monday following a blizzard that could become one of the most costly in the history of the state’s agriculture industry. As state officials spent the day calculating the multi-million dollar impact to the regional economy from Friday's storm, ranchers began digging up hundreds of cattle that are still buried beneath feet of snow. "This is absolutely, totally devastating," said Steve Schell, a 52-year-old rancher from Caputa. "This is horrendous. I mean the death loss of these cows in this country is unbelievable." Schell said he estimated he had lost half of his herd, but it could be far more. He was still struggling to find snow-buried cattle and those that had been pushed miles by winds that gusted at 70 miles per hour on Friday night. Martha Wierzbicki, emergency management director for Butte County, said the trail of carcasses was a gruesome sight across the region. “They’re in the fence line, laying alongside the roads,” she said. “It’s really sickening.” Silvia Christen, executive director of the South Dakota Stockgrowers Association, said most ranchers she had spoken to were reporting that 20 to 50 percent of their herds had been killed. "I have never heard of anything like it," she said. "And none of the ranchers I have talked to can remember anything like it." While South Dakota ranchers are no strangers to blizzards, what made Friday's storm so damaging was how early it arrived in the season. Christen said cattle hadn't yet grown their winter coats to insulate them from freezing wind and snow. In addition, Christen said, during the cold months, ranchers tend to move their cattle to pastures that have more trees and gullies to protect them from storms. Because Friday's storm arrived so early in the year, most ranchers were still grazing their herds on summer pasture, which tend to be more exposed and located farther away from ranch homes. Ultimately, Christen said, she believed that more than 5 percent of the roughly 1.5 million cattle in Western South Dakota had been killed. "It's much higher than that," she said. "But I'm not sure where that number is going to land." Jodie Anderson, executive director of the South Dakota Cattlemen's Association, said the pain for ranchers is now compounded by dysfunction within the federal government. While the government has programs to help ranchers who suffer losses from catastrophic weather events, those programs are in limbo because Congress has failed to pass a farm bill. The legislation is normally passed every five years and controls subsidy and insurance programs for the agriculture industry. Making things worse, because the government is currently in a partial shutdown, ranchers are unable to ask federal officials questions about how they might be reimbursed in the future. "A lot of the government agencies that we would normally be turning to for those answers are furloughed,” she said. “So there's this sort of timing issue that's enhancing the frustration out there in cattle country." The shutdown was caused after House Republicans, including U.S. Rep Kristi Noem, R-S.D., refused to pass a resolution to fund the government unless Democrats weakened or delayed parts of President Obama's 2010 health care overhaul. On Monday, Sen. Tim Johnson, D-S.D., pointed to South Dakota's battered ranchers as another example of why House Republicans needed to continue funding the government without preconditions. "Like the snow storm, the government shutdown is causing major disruptions in people’s lives and every day business," he said in a statement. Whether they are eventually reimbursed for their losses or not, however, ranchers are likely to feel the pain for years. David Uhrig, 31, a rancher in Folsom, said he estimated about 25 percent of his herd had been killed, which meant far fewer calves this spring. “We are looking at years of rebuilding to get back to what we lost,” he said. In the short term, however, Uhrig had far more pressing concerns. Like most ranchers, he spent most of Monday searching his land for stray cattle or sorting out cattle that had drifted into neighboring herds. “It’s not uncommon at this point to find cattle that are five miles from where they should be,” he said. “Which doesn't seem like a lot, but to drift five miles in a storm — that’s a lot.” Dustin Oedekoven, South Dakota’s state veterinarian, said that the next immediate challenge for ranchers would be disposal of carcasses. “That can be a significant source of disease spread, so we want to make sure those carcasses are burned, buried or rendered as quickly as possible,” he said. Oedekoven said disposal was primarily be the responsibility of ranchers themselves. However, the state was also helping ranchers get in touch with haulers that would take carcasses away for rendering. He added that, while the federal government was in poor shape to offer assistance because of the shutdown and a lack of a farm bill, ranchers should thoroughly document all cattle deaths. He said that could include taking photos, collecting cattle tags, or bringing in a veterinarian or farm service provider as an eye witness of deaths. “If you don’t keep good records about your losses you won’t be available for indemnity funds should they become available,” he said.


Via Stéphane Bisaillon, Josh Nelson
Josh Nelson's insight:

Cassie Chriswell:

This all took place in South Dakota!  It was a big blizard that cost a lot of money due to all the cattle lost.  Officals say that it is going to be a multi-million dollar loss due to the calculations.  That's not good!  Winds gusted up to and at 70 miles per hour on that Friday night.  It was so bad because most of the cattle hadent grown a there winter fur coat yet.  Most of the cattle got blown away or frozen to death due to the cold weather.   Estimates we made that 1.5 million cattle died in South Dakota due to the biggest blizard.

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Sydney Bolyard's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:27 AM

This excerpt of an unfortunate event across South Dakota has left several farms without sufficient cattle availability and loss of profit. In not way was this incident the farmer’s fault. This occurrence was completely out of their hands because it was just the weather. 

Summer Rain Reimer's curator insight, December 8, 2013 1:38 PM

There was a blizzard  in South Dakota. They didn't know about the  storm coming .They left the cattles out over night and it snowed  really bad. The cattles got buried in the snow and they can't get out  because the snow was heavy . Over 10,000 cattles got killed by the blizzard. They hadent grown their winter coats to keep them warm because it takes a long time to grow the winter coats. But the blizzard came to South Dakota early then they expected and that why they had died. cause their coats didnt grow all the way in .

Connor Emmert's curator insight, December 10, 2013 10:53 AM

This kinda of thing really sucks. but theres really nothing anyone can do. I think maybe having more shelter may have helped though. the damage is in the millions , not to mention the farmers that dont have that kind of insurance. this is just a crappy thing all around

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Livestock Farmers Feeling the Pressure

Livestock Farmers Feeling the Pressure By H. Scott Hurd, DVM, Ph.D Published in Focus on Agriculture There are many pressures on livestock farmers today. Many of these pressures are not the typical...
Josh Nelson's insight:

Cassie Chriswell:

Farmers have all kinds of stress theses days.  Many farmers have stress about the political pressures related to the antiobtic use in food.  " Meats without antibitic drugs" or " Antibitic Free" meat may lead to a very negitative troubles to the animals well-being!  

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Cassie Chriswell's curator insight, September 28, 2013 11:49 AM

Farmers have all kinds of stress these days.  Most of the farmers stress is about political pressures related to antiobtic use in food.  " Meat without drugs " or " Antibiotic Free " meat may lead to very negitative troubles to the animal well- being! 

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Five Species You Thought Were Endangered That Really Aren't (Including the ... - Slate Magazine (blog)

Five Species You Thought Were Endangered That Really Aren't (Including the ... - Slate Magazine (blog) | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
Slate Magazine (blog)
Five Species You Thought Were Endangered That Really Aren't (Including the ...
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Summer Rain Reimer's curator insight, December 8, 2013 1:30 PM

humpback whales really arnt endangered because of the save the whales . their speices is widely misunderstood.

praying mantises are not at all indagered their are more than 20 diffrent species of mantises. 

clouded leopards thier is no data saying that their species is in decline . we dont here about them cause their almost the last thing on the cat chart , that why poeple think they are endangered.

komodo dragon - they can be come endagered if we keep hunting on them but their not endagered yet . their are about 5,000 wild one spreaded around multiple island.

polar bears their are about 25,000 polar bears worldwide and their are about 19 subpopulation of polar bears .people think their endagered cause of global warming .

Josh Nelson's curator insight, December 9, 2013 3:53 PM

Cassie Chriswell: 

 

Humpback Whales- 

- estimated at 125,000, and today they probably number about 80,000 individuals.

 

Praying Mantises- 

- illegall to kill then in the United States

- more than 20 species are found in North America 

 

Clouded Leopared-

- not a leopared at all, but it is the smallest of the big cat family

 

Komado Dragons- 

- only 5,000 left on tiny little islands

 

Polar Bears- 

- some people say that it is due to global warming that they became extinct

- only 25,000 polar bears left worldwide 

Olivia Haltom's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:09 AM

i thought it was intresting to find out these animals really arent endangered.

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TRADE NEWSWIRE - Khalifa Port receives first livestock shipment

TRADE NEWSWIRE - Khalifa Port receives first livestock shipment | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
Khalifa Port receives first livestock shipment
http://t.co/7c5RG4sCA0
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Kassidi Cadle's curator insight, December 5, 2013 10:13 AM

This shipped carried 650 cattle and over 20,000 sheep. This shipment was the first shipment for the ADPC. All livestock shipments have arrived or gone through Zayed Port but now they can go through Khalifa's Port. Khalifa's Port is also receiving it's license to port livestock frequently. 

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Western Black Rhino Declared Extinct | TIME.com

Western Black Rhino Declared Extinct | TIME.com | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
Other rhino species remain on the brink (Sad - one more magnificent animal is no more & our world grows poorer -Western Black Rhino Declared Extinct http://t.co/FAGvufUdub via @TIME)...
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Tens of thousands of cattle killed in Friday's blizzard, ranchers say

Tens of thousands of cattle killed in Friday's blizzard, ranchers say | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it

Tens of thousands of cattle killed in Friday's blizzard, ranchers say October 08, 2013 7:33 am • Daniel Simmons-Ritchie Journal staff Tens of thousands of cattle lie dead across South Dakota on Monday following a blizzard that could become one of the most costly in the history of the state’s agriculture industry. As state officials spent the day calculating the multi-million dollar impact to the regional economy from Friday's storm, ranchers began digging up hundreds of cattle that are still buried beneath feet of snow. "This is absolutely, totally devastating," said Steve Schell, a 52-year-old rancher from Caputa. "This is horrendous. I mean the death loss of these cows in this country is unbelievable." Schell said he estimated he had lost half of his herd, but it could be far more. He was still struggling to find snow-buried cattle and those that had been pushed miles by winds that gusted at 70 miles per hour on Friday night. Martha Wierzbicki, emergency management director for Butte County, said the trail of carcasses was a gruesome sight across the region. “They’re in the fence line, laying alongside the roads,” she said. “It’s really sickening.” Silvia Christen, executive director of the South Dakota Stockgrowers Association, said most ranchers she had spoken to were reporting that 20 to 50 percent of their herds had been killed. "I have never heard of anything like it," she said. "And none of the ranchers I have talked to can remember anything like it." While South Dakota ranchers are no strangers to blizzards, what made Friday's storm so damaging was how early it arrived in the season. Christen said cattle hadn't yet grown their winter coats to insulate them from freezing wind and snow. In addition, Christen said, during the cold months, ranchers tend to move their cattle to pastures that have more trees and gullies to protect them from storms. Because Friday's storm arrived so early in the year, most ranchers were still grazing their herds on summer pasture, which tend to be more exposed and located farther away from ranch homes. Ultimately, Christen said, she believed that more than 5 percent of the roughly 1.5 million cattle in Western South Dakota had been killed. "It's much higher than that," she said. "But I'm not sure where that number is going to land." Jodie Anderson, executive director of the South Dakota Cattlemen's Association, said the pain for ranchers is now compounded by dysfunction within the federal government. While the government has programs to help ranchers who suffer losses from catastrophic weather events, those programs are in limbo because Congress has failed to pass a farm bill. The legislation is normally passed every five years and controls subsidy and insurance programs for the agriculture industry. Making things worse, because the government is currently in a partial shutdown, ranchers are unable to ask federal officials questions about how they might be reimbursed in the future. "A lot of the government agencies that we would normally be turning to for those answers are furloughed,” she said. “So there's this sort of timing issue that's enhancing the frustration out there in cattle country." The shutdown was caused after House Republicans, including U.S. Rep Kristi Noem, R-S.D., refused to pass a resolution to fund the government unless Democrats weakened or delayed parts of President Obama's 2010 health care overhaul. On Monday, Sen. Tim Johnson, D-S.D., pointed to South Dakota's battered ranchers as another example of why House Republicans needed to continue funding the government without preconditions. "Like the snow storm, the government shutdown is causing major disruptions in people’s lives and every day business," he said in a statement. Whether they are eventually reimbursed for their losses or not, however, ranchers are likely to feel the pain for years. David Uhrig, 31, a rancher in Folsom, said he estimated about 25 percent of his herd had been killed, which meant far fewer calves this spring. “We are looking at years of rebuilding to get back to what we lost,” he said. In the short term, however, Uhrig had far more pressing concerns. Like most ranchers, he spent most of Monday searching his land for stray cattle or sorting out cattle that had drifted into neighboring herds. “It’s not uncommon at this point to find cattle that are five miles from where they should be,” he said. “Which doesn't seem like a lot, but to drift five miles in a storm — that’s a lot.” Dustin Oedekoven, South Dakota’s state veterinarian, said that the next immediate challenge for ranchers would be disposal of carcasses. “That can be a significant source of disease spread, so we want to make sure those carcasses are burned, buried or rendered as quickly as possible,” he said. Oedekoven said disposal was primarily be the responsibility of ranchers themselves. However, the state was also helping ranchers get in touch with haulers that would take carcasses away for rendering. He added that, while the federal government was in poor shape to offer assistance because of the shutdown and a lack of a farm bill, ranchers should thoroughly document all cattle deaths. He said that could include taking photos, collecting cattle tags, or bringing in a veterinarian or farm service provider as an eye witness of deaths. “If you don’t keep good records about your losses you won’t be available for indemnity funds should they become available,” he said.


Via Stéphane Bisaillon
more...
Summer Rain Reimer's curator insight, December 8, 2013 1:38 PM

There was a blizzard  in South Dakota. They didn't know about the  storm coming .They left the cattles out over night and it snowed  really bad. The cattles got buried in the snow and they can't get out  because the snow was heavy . Over 10,000 cattles got killed by the blizzard. They hadent grown their winter coats to keep them warm because it takes a long time to grow the winter coats. But the blizzard came to South Dakota early then they expected and that why they had died. cause their coats didnt grow all the way in .

Josh Nelson's curator insight, December 9, 2013 5:16 PM

Cassie Chriswell:

This all took place in South Dakota!  It was a big blizard that cost a lot of money due to all the cattle lost.  Officals say that it is going to be a multi-million dollar loss due to the calculations.  That's not good!  Winds gusted up to and at 70 miles per hour on that Friday night.  It was so bad because most of the cattle hadent grown a there winter fur coat yet.  Most of the cattle got blown away or frozen to death due to the cold weather.   Estimates we made that 1.5 million cattle died in South Dakota due to the biggest blizard.

Connor Emmert's curator insight, December 10, 2013 10:53 AM

This kinda of thing really sucks. but theres really nothing anyone can do. I think maybe having more shelter may have helped though. the damage is in the millions , not to mention the farmers that dont have that kind of insurance. this is just a crappy thing all around

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Publication details - Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry

Publication details - Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
Livestock export earnings forecast to increase by 7.6% in 2013-14 to $16.1B after increasing by 1.4% in 12-13 http://t.co/08WWXhNWaJ
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A National Livestock Policy Hub Has Been Launched In Ghana - spyghana.com

A National Livestock Policy Hub Has Been Launched In Ghana - spyghana.com | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
Ghana News Agency A National Livestock Policy Hub Has Been Launched In Ghana spyghana.com Dr Ahmed Yakubu Alhassan, Deputy Minister for Food and Agriculture in-charge of Crops, on Tuesday said Ghana is still a net importer of livestock products as...
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FAO - News Article: Major cuts of greenhouse gas emissions from livestock within reach

FAO - News Article: Major cuts of greenhouse gas emissions from livestock within reach | Animal Sciences | Scoop.it
But livestock GHG emissions cld be cut by 30% simply thru wider use of existing best practices & techniques: http://t.co/RG0qDBCqUa
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Livestock Farmers Feeling the Pressure

Livestock Farmers Feeling the Pressure By H. Scott Hurd, DVM, Ph.D Published in Focus on Agriculture There are many pressures on livestock farmers today. Many of these pressures are not the typical...
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Cassie Chriswell's curator insight, September 28, 2013 11:49 AM

Farmers have all kinds of stress these days.  Most of the farmers stress is about political pressures related to antiobtic use in food.  " Meat without drugs " or " Antibiotic Free " meat may lead to very negitative troubles to the animal well- being! 

Josh Nelson's curator insight, December 9, 2013 2:28 PM

Cassie Chriswell:

Farmers have all kinds of stress theses days.  Many farmers have stress about the political pressures related to the antiobtic use in food.  " Meats without antibitic drugs" or " Antibitic Free" meat may lead to a very negitative troubles to the animals well-being!