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10 Pretty Awesome Things You Can do With PowerPoint

10 Pretty Awesome Things You Can do With PowerPoint | animal science | Scoop.it
When Used With Tact, These Techniques can Help to Make Your Presentations Fun and Engaging It'd easy to bash PowerPoint, especially given the poor uses we see

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Training in Business's curator insight, September 17, 2014 6:40 AM

10 Pretty Awesome Things You Can do With PowerPoint

Character Minutes's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:26 PM

Contains a few new ways to use PowerPoint

tom jackson's curator insight, September 19, 2014 8:41 AM

PPT isn't new, but have you explored all the ways you can make innovative presentations using it?  Worth your time just to ensure your getting your presentation opportunities from it

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Farm accident kills teen in Heidelberg Township - Lebanon Daily News

Farm accident kills teen in Heidelberg Township - Lebanon Daily News | animal science | Scoop.it
Farm accident kills teen in Heidelberg Township
Lebanon Daily News
A 17-year-old Heidelberg Township boy was killed in a farming accident Wednesday morning, state police at Lickdale said.

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Can You Look At 15 Pictures Of Animals Yawning Without Yawning Too?

Can You Look At 15 Pictures Of Animals Yawning Without Yawning Too? | animal science | Scoop.it
I bet you can't look through these 15 pictures of animals yawning without breaking into a yawn yourself. I couldn't and I doubt you can either.

Via Chris Hughes
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#FloridaProblems: 7-foot alligator removed from drain pipe; 14,275 nuisance alligator complaints in 2011

#FloridaProblems: 7-foot alligator removed from drain pipe; 14,275 nuisance alligator complaints in 2011 | animal science | Scoop.it

MERRITT ISLAND, Fla. - Unlike the alligators of urban legend that lurk in Manhattan’s sewers, a real-life reptile took up residence in a drain pipe in an otherwise quiet neighborhood near the Ulamay Wildlife Sanctuary -- belching menacing, rumbling hisses at passers-by.

 

Since December, the alligator inhabited the grated end of a stormwater pipe off Lakewood Circle. And nearby humans feared for the animal’s health and safety.

 

Neighborhood guesstimates of the gator’s length ranged from 4 to 10 feet -- only the fearsome, scaly snout was typically visible, poking out of the pipe. Whatever its length, the toothy reptile apparently was not happy with its living situation.

 

Hours later, the reptile was removed. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officers used plastic piping to coax the 7-foot gator to backpedal -- “he wasn’t at all happy about it,” spokeswoman Joy Hill described -- and the beast was captured soon afterward.

 

The alligator was relocated to a St. Johns River marsh, Hill said.

 

The FWC’s Statewide Nuisance Alligator Program received 14,275 nuisance alligator complaints in 2011, and 6,995 gators were removed...

 (click pic to continue reading)


Via Billy Corben
Angelica D. Ignacio's insight:

an animal need a safe envirorment it was 4 to 10 feet a snout saw his head poping out of the pipe when they were in the woods hours later the reptile was removed.

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Cassie Chriswell's curator insight, September 28, 2013 4:27 PM

The poor alligator was stuck in a drain pipe in Merritt Island, Florida.  Its not good for the alligators safety or the peoples  safety that found him.  After they caught him they relocated him to St. Johns River Marsh.  Near where the pipe was there was a school.. At the school they had boys that feed it hot dogs and even teased it.  Also they had girls that conducted a prayer service rigth by the pipe where alligator was at.  It was stuck in a drain pipe. 

Josh Nelson's curator insight, December 11, 2013 2:20 PM
Cassie Chriswell: 

This alligator was stuck in a drain pipe in Merritt Island, Florida.  Its not good for the alligators safety or the peoples  safety.  Espeectily for the people that found the animal stuck.    After they caught him they relocated him to St. Johns River Marsh.  Near where the pipe was there was a school.. At the school they had boys that feed it hot dogs and even teased it.  Also they had girls that conducted a prayer service rigth by the pipe where alligator was at.  It was stuck in a drain pipe. It would have been bad if anyone got hurt in the process of getting the animal out! But, luckly nobody was hurt!!

Mark Lindsay's curator insight, February 25, 2014 1:52 PM

Another reason to call Mark Lindsay & Son Plumbing & Heating

(973) 728-8900

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UAB researchers completely cure type 1 diabetes in dogs with a single session of gene therapy

UAB researchers completely cure type 1 diabetes in dogs  with a single session of gene therapy | animal science | Scoop.it

Researchers at the Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona have succeeded in completely curing type 1 diabetes in dogs with a single session of gene therapy. This is the first time that the disease has been cured in large animals, a fundamental step towards applying the therapy in humans. The study, based on introducing a "glucose sensor" into muscle, has been published in Diabetes, the most prestigious journal in this field. 

Researchers from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), led by Fátima Bosch, have shown for the first time that it is possible to cure diabetes in large animals with a single session of gene therapy. As published this week in Diabetes, the principal journal for research on the disease, after a single gene therapy session, the dogs recover their health and no longer show symptoms of the disease. In some cases, monitoring continued for over four years, with no recurrence of symptoms.
 
The therapy is minimally invasive. It consists of a single session of various injections in the animal's rear legs using simple needles that are commonly used in cosmetic treatments. These injections introduce gene therapy vectors, with a dual objective: to express the insulin gene, on the one hand, and that of glucokinase, on the other. Glucokinase is an enzyme that regulates the uptake of glucose from the blood. When both genes act simultaneously they function as a "glucose sensor", which automatically regulates the uptake of glucose from the blood, thus reducing diabetic hyperglycemia (the excess of blood sugar associated with the disease).
 
As Fátima Bosch, the head researcher, points out, "this study is the first to demonstrate a long-term cure for diabetes in a large animal model using gene therapy.”
 
This same research group had already tested this type of therapy on mice, but the excellent results obtained for the first time with large animals lays the foundations for the clinical translation of this gene therapy approach to veterinary medicine and eventually to diabetic patients.
 
The study was led by the head of the UAB's Centre for Animal Biotechnology and Gene Therapy (CBATEG) Fàtima Bosch, and involved the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the UAB, the Department of Medicine and Animal Surgery of the UAB, the Faculty of Veterinary Science of the UAB, the Department of Animal Health and Anatomy of the UAB, the Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Disorders (CIBERDEM), the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (USA) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute of Philadelphia (USA).
 
The study provides ample data showing the safety of gene therapy mediated by adeno-associated vectors (AAV) in diabetic dogs. The therapy has proved to be safe and efficacious: it is based on the transfer of two genes to the muscle of adult animals using a new generation of very safe vectors known as adeno-associated vectors. These vectors, derived from non-pathogenic viruses, are widely used in gene therapy and have been successful in treating several diseases.
 
In fact, the first gene therapy medicine ever approved by the European Medicines Agency, named Glybera®, makes use of adeno-associated vectors to treat a metabolic disease caused by a deficiency of lipoprotein lipase and the resulting accumulation of triglycerides in the blood.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Angelica D. Ignacio's insight:

it is the first time autonma de barcelona have cured type 1 diabetes. They cured it in dogs with a single session of gene therapy. It is the first time it has been cured in a large animal. It is a fundamental step to humans. After the gene session the dogs recover there health and show no more symptoms of type 1 diabetes. They tested in mice aready it was the same. 

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Destiny Muniz's curator insight, October 24, 2013 2:27 PM

They inject numerious things into the hine legs this introduces the gene therapy vectors, with a dual objective Glucokinase and insuline. 
They say that the goal of this study is demonstrate a long term cure for diabetes in large animals using this type of method. This has been tested on mice before and now these are very good results from this test.

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Mysterious Bug Builds Fence Around Eggs For Protection

Mysterious Bug Builds Fence Around Eggs For Protection | animal science | Scoop.it
A mysterious bug was recently discovered by Troy Alexander in the Peruvian Amazon. This little creature builds a fence around it's eggs and nobody has

Via Chris Hughes
Angelica D. Ignacio's insight:

cool 

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Julie Robsin's comment, September 14, 2013 4:41 AM
Cute little creature
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A Deadly Alkaline Lake in Africa Turns Animals into Calcified Statues

A Deadly Alkaline Lake in Africa Turns Animals into Calcified Statues | animal science | Scoop.it

Via Deloste
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Deloste's curator insight, October 3, 2013 10:47 AM

By Nick Brandt

Beth Jung's curator insight, March 3, 2014 5:34 AM

This article is about the Lake Natron in northern Tanzania and is the most serene lake in Africa. The alkaline water in Lake Natron has a pH as high as 10.5 and is so caustic it can burn the skin and eyes of animals that aren't adapted to it. The deposits of sodium carbonate, which was once used in the Egyptian mummification, acts as a type of preservative for those unlucky animals that have died. While working, Africa Photographer, Nick Brandt, discovered dead animals on the shoreline. I never knew there was these kinds of lakes or rivers in Africa. This river does not drain in or out of any river or sea, and they are fed by hot springs and small rivers. In a hot climate, this lake can be up to 106 degrees Fahrenheit. I think it is very cool how there were such places in Africa because I thought there's only deserts and countries and cities, not like these abandoned places. It is very sad how animals die and it is really cool how the animals can survive when they are adapted to it. The things that were used from a long time ago can still harm people and environment these days so we should watch those out.