Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it?
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Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it?
Following the Animal Poaching Trail in Africa and the World
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Three musketeers on a mission for African wildlife.

The Lion, Rhino and Elephant join forces with the Panda, and go on a mission to Vietnam and China, in an effort to draw attention to the escalating wildlife ...
Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Great video Jan! Indeed if we can curb the demand the killing can stop.

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Success Story: Effective law enforcement stops wildlife trafficking

Success Story: Effective law enforcement stops wildlife trafficking | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

Suwanna Gauntlett direct action conservationist:

 

"We believe law enforcement is the deterrent that is needed because this is a true genocide and all these species are just… It’s a hemorrhage out of the national parks. And right now the situation is so bad that this is the only thing you can really do. Of course you can do awareness [campaigns], it’s not going to change people’s behavior. For example, the moment we don’t patrol Road no. 4, which is the road going in to Phnom Penh, wildlife is stacked and sold again. It’s like drugs. It’s not something you can eradicate just by “nice, nice” campaigns. We are more interested in working on the supply end because of the rapid decimation of species. No amount of workshops and platforms for discussion and policies and institutional strengthening in going to make a difference. It’s law enforcement in the field that works."

 

http://www.earthisland.org/journal/index.php/elist/eListRead/wildlife_trafficking_cant_be_eradicated_just_by_nice_nice_campaigns/

Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Let's get this gal to Africa!

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Wildlife trafficking is $19 billion-per-year illicit business, but governments fail to treat it as such

Wildlife trafficking is $19 billion-per-year illicit business, but governments fail to treat it as such | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Illegal wildlife trafficking is a $19 billion-a-year business, making it the fourth largest illicit market after drugs, counterfeiting, and human trafficking, yet efforts to control it are
Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Hmm! Had heard that wildlife trafficking ranked 3rd?

However, what's most important is that too few governments take the illegal trade seriously enough to eradicate it.

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Dozens of animals killed in wild as poaching increases northwest of Calgary

Dozens of animals killed in wild as poaching increases northwest of Calgary | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
CALGARY — A female cougar and dozens of other wildlife, including elk, sheep, deer and moose, have been killed illegally in the Water Valley, Sundre and Olds areas in the past two months, officials say....

Poaching can do a great deal of harm, experts warn.

Sean Nichols, a conservation specialist with the Alberta Wilderness Association, said poaching can seriously upset the balance of the ecosystem.

“If there’s a ban on hunting, it’s there for a reason,” Nichols said.

“For reasons of biodiversity and for maintaining the entire ecosystem, there is a need to have certain populations of wildlife on the land, and those populations need to be preserved.”

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/technology/Dozens+animals+killed+wild+poaching+increases+northwest+Calgary/7690722/story.html#ixzz2EwgT1A69
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Wildlife Margrit's comment, December 13, 2012 10:20 AM
Often we associate poaching with Africa and developing countries... not so it seems.
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EIA response to Fighting Illicit Wildlife Trafficking study

EIA response to Fighting Illicit Wildlife Trafficking study | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Arriving on the heels of what appears to be another major haul of smuggled ivory the EIA welcomes the the 'Fighting Illicit Wildlife Trafficking’ study,
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Save wildlife from trafficking

Save wildlife from trafficking | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Carter Roberts says the trade in illicit wildlife has become one of the next biggest criminal enterprises in the world, funding rebel militias and organized crime. Nations must confront it.
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WWF drones raise serious questions for international security

WWF drones raise serious questions for international security | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

The World Wildlife Federation's proposed plans to utilise drones in anti-poaching efforts raise serious concerns....

 

First and foremost, we need to ask whether it is ever in society's best interest to have non-state actors increasingly undertake direct and indirect security missions in lieu of states.

 

In the aftermath of the Blackwater incidents in Iraq, there was a strong argument against the privatisation of military and policing operations by commercial companies. Yet, private military contractors continue to operate in conflict zones around the world and many officials call them essential components to security and commercial operations in destabilised countries....

 

Finally, we cannot ignore the very real possibility that these surveillance programmes will raise suspicions among foreign government security agencies. Many will be concerned as to whether such activities will be limited solely to their stated purpose. Whether we are talking about anti-poaching programmes in Africa or anti-piracy operations in Southeast Asia, their concerns will be heightened wherever the surveillance overlaps with one of their national interests regardless of who is operating the surveillance platform and with what intent....

 

Ultimately, the point of raising this inquiry is not to criticise the WWF (and Google) for out-of-the-box thinking on how best to tackle anti-poaching, which is an important issue that should draw more international coverage. Instead, it is to point out that these new types of surveillance programmes raise serious questions that require more consideration by the international community....

 

@ASEANReporting

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PHOTOS: Thai airport authorities seize hundreds of animals in two separate seizures

PHOTOS: Thai airport authorities seize hundreds of animals in two separate seizures | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

Bangkok, Thailand, 4th December 2012—Authorities in Thailand have rescued 343 tortoises and freshwater turtles believed to be destined for markets in Hong Kong and arrested two men who were delivering the consignment for shipping. In a separate incident, snakes, scorpions and even centipedes were found in the luggage of a passenger due to fly to Doha.

 

Acting on information, officers from the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation (DNP), Royal Thai Customs and the Fisheries Department seized 343 turtles and tortoises packed into bags and stuffed into polystyrene boxes for transport early this morning.

 

The haul found at the Cargo Complex of Suvarnabhumi International Airport included the Endangered Asian Brown Tortoise Manouria emys and the Giant Asian Pond Turtle Heosemys grandis, which is listed as Vulnerable. These turtles and tortoises are traded throughout the region, largely for use as food and medicine. International trade in both is restricted through their listing in Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).,,,

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Poachers Got To Him First

Poachers Got To Him First | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

GOALPARA, ASSAM, INDIA -- Forest officials and villagers came together in northeast India's Assam state to rescue an elephant that got trapped in a mud-pit.

 

Local media reports said that the adult male had been trapped since Wednesday (December 05).

 

While the animal continued to struggle for its freedom, poachers made the most of the opportunity and cut off its tusks.

 

Weakened by three days of struggling and not being able to feed, the elephant was unable to pull itself out when forest officials arrived at the scene on Saturday (December 08). Even the assistance of a tame elephant was insufficient to enable the trapped elephant to pull itself out of the mud....

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Poachers held with endangered red panda skins

KATHMANDU, Dec 6: Metropolitan Police Crime Division on Thursday detained Kishor Tamang, 18, and Mingmar Lama, 26, of Rasuwa District from Old Guheswari Chowk while they were on a look out for customers to sell three whole skins of endangered red panda.

 

The Crime Division was able to arrest Tamang and Lama with the help of tip off from the locals of Guheswari who informed them that the two were trying to sell the skins for Rs 200,000....

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Laos ‘extremely vulnerable’ to trafficking by organized crime groups – UN official

Laos ‘extremely vulnerable’ to trafficking by organized crime groups – UN official | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Due to its unique position in the Greater Mekong region and its shared borders with five countries, Laos is “extremely vulnerable” to the trafficking of people, illicit drugs and commodities by organized crime groups, a senior United Nations...
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The Connection Between Species Extinction, Organized Crime, and the Spread of Disease

The Connection Between Species Extinction, Organized Crime, and the Spread of Disease | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
There is no lack of reasons to join efforts to stop wildlife trafficking. Together, we need to protect the source, break the chain and stop demand.

 

Illegal wildlife trafficking may prove to be the demise of many of our Earth's species. Further, this activity -- which is snuffing out the last populations of elephants, tigers and other animals -- finances organized crime and augments the spread of zoonotic diseases. There is no lack of reasons to join efforts to stop wildlife trafficking. Together, we need to protect the source, break the chain and stop demand....

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Hanoi: Wildlife Conservation Events for the Public | Embassy of the United States

All of the below events are open for the public. We would like you to plan carefully before registering with us so that we have enough seats for participants. If you register for our events but change your plan, kindly notify us by email to irchanoi@gmail.com.

 

Wildlife Conservation Film Festival  

American Music and Dance

Soft Skills Training: Becoming an Ideal Colleague: Respectful, Responsible, and Reliable


...and more

http://vietnam.usembassy.gov/program.html#1204 ;


 

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Russian ships, aircraft to fight poachers ahead of New Year

Russian ships, aircraft to fight poachers ahead of New Year | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
20 Russian ships and aircraft have been sent to the Sea of Okhotsk and Sea of Japan to fight poachers in the run-up to the New Year.
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Indian Biodiversity Talks's comment, December 20, 2012 1:17 AM
It is great that authorities are taking stringent measures to fight poaching. Just as leading countries in the world have taken collaborated action to curb piracy in the high seas, it is time to enforce stringent international cooperation to curb the menace of wildlife trafficking and international poaching rackets.
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“Wildlife Trafficking Can’t be Eradicated Just by ‘Nice, Nice’ Campaigns”

“Wildlife Trafficking Can’t be Eradicated Just by ‘Nice, Nice’ Campaigns” | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
A conversation with "direct action conservationist" Suwanna Gauntlett
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A Glimpse of What We've Lost: 10 Extinct Animals in Photos

A Glimpse of What We've Lost: 10 Extinct Animals in Photos | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
We're in the midst of the sixth great extinction right now, with the rise of humans being behind the unpredented rise in the rate we're losing species.
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Elephant poachers shot dead

Zimparks rangers have shot and killed two suspected elephant poachers in Mushumbi Pools in the Dande Valley, a senior official confirmed yesterday.
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Illegal wildlife trade worth €15bn

Illegal wildlife trade worth €15bn | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Trafficking of wildlife and products such as timber and rhino horn is one of the world’s biggest illegal trades, worth €15 billion a year, conservationists have warned.
Wildlife Margrit's insight:

That's well over $19 Billion! 

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allAfrica.com: Kenya: Poachers Now Harvest Elephant Genitals in Bizarre Twist to Paoching in Northern Kenya.

allAfrica.com: Kenya: Poachers Now Harvest Elephant Genitals in Bizarre Twist to Paoching in Northern Kenya. | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Poachers in Northern Kenya are finding more to harvest from elephants other than just their tusks. They are now hacking off the foreheads of the poached beasts and at their genitals

There were two cases of elephant poaching reporte last week. The first incident occurred at Louwa Lo Nkishu on December 4 while the second happened three days later in Milango, both in Samburu area. The tusks and genitals from the first incident were recovered....
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VIDEO: Law Enforcers Crack Down on Illegal Wildlife Trade

VIDEO: Law Enforcers Crack Down on Illegal Wildlife Trade | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Wildlife law enforcers from Africa, Asia, and the United States are joining forces to crack down on poachers, smugglers, and black market dealers.
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Coco Island Costa Rica still Threatened by Poachers

Coco Island Costa Rica still Threatened by Poachers | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Cocos Island Costa Rica is a renowned National Park and is a World Heritage Site and is one of the country’s richest in terms of biodiversity, but every year the region is threatened by illegal fishing.


Problems such as lack of staff and equipment keep the authorities, who make a huge effort with few resources virtually defenseless.
A 2012 report for the Control and Protection of Cocos Island National Park, a total 21 rangers and over half of them are assigned to work in the control and protection program.


The report emphasizes the need to begin a training process for licensing officials with basic seamanship with the ability to operate patrol vessels.


As of September this year, a total of 47 incidence of illegal fishing was reported....

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After Another Cruel Spate of Poaching in China

After Another Cruel Spate of Poaching in China | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
The poaching and trading of wild animals has again attracted the attention of China’s Internet users after a video called “Shocking Killings” aired on a popular Chinese television program, Focal Interview (焦点访谈), on China Central Television (CCTV). The video was secretly recorded by a journalist in Zixi County, a small mountainous area in Jiangxi Province. The county advertises itself as a “Jade in China” and a “Human Oasis” based on its ecological environment index and the fact that 87% of its surface is covered by forest. But the reality is far darker for its animal residents, including wild macaques, geese, muntjacs and boars.
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Reducing China’s wildlife trade

Reducing China’s wildlife trade | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

China is one of the world’s largest consumers of wildlife products, from elephant ivory to shark fin, from rhino horn to pangolin scale.

 

Since IFAW established a Beijing office in 1997, we have committed to reducing demand in China for wildlife products. Our Chinese leadership and staff provide essential insight into Chinese society that results in locally relevant, effective initiatives to reduce consumption and trade of wildlife products both online and offline....

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Wildlife Trafficking puts humans and animals at risk

Wildlife Trafficking puts humans and animals at risk | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
World Wildlife Conservation Day marks an increase in wildlife trafficking raising health and security concerns. The U.S. State Department has initiated a pledge to raise awareness of the issue.
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Kenya: Urgent Action Needed to Curb Poaching

Kenya: Urgent Action Needed to Curb Poaching | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
The Kenya Wildlife Services has raised the alarm over fall in the number of Elephants and grevy Zebra in the larger Laikipia, Samburu, Isiolo and Marsabit complex in the last three years.

The elephant population had reduced from 7,415 in the 2008 census to 6,361 in the 2012 census while that of Grevy's zebra had gone down from 2,400 in 2008 to 1,870 in 2012...

 

Quote of the day: "I hereby accuse the North American empire of being the biggest menace to our planet." -- Hugo Chavez was re-elected President of Venezuela on December 3, 2006

 

WildlifeMargrit:

Sadly, although the trophy hunters and consumers of North America are a threat to Africa's widlife... the exploitation via organized crime steming from Asia appears a much larger threat.

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