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Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it?
Following the Animal Poaching Trail in Africa and the World
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How Namibia turned poachers into gamekeepers and saved rare wildlife - CNN.com

How Namibia turned poachers into gamekeepers and saved rare wildlife - CNN.com | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

In Namibia, the question of who owns the wildlife has often been fraught with difficulties....

 

When John Kasaona was a young boy, his father did what many men did at the time; he poached.

 

"He used to catch everything from springbok to lion," recalls Kasaona. "There was constant food in our family."


The practice was, of course, illegal, and the landowners often came down hard on poachers.


"It was a very awkward situation," says Kasaona. "The colonial government's department of conservation started opening up pots in the local communities to see what was in those pots."


Though the authorities arrested perpetrators, poaching remained rampant in the 1970s and 1980s as bad droughts and a war for independence ravaged local livestock. As a result, many species in Namibia were facing extinction....

 

In 1983, Kasaona's father was asked by the village headman to stop poaching. From now on he would no longer hunt wildlife; he would protect it. He was one of the first poachers turned "game guards", in the country.


The novel idea -- to protect wildlife by enlisting those most skilled at tracking it -- was the brainchild of the Integrated Rural Development and Nature Conservation (IRDNC), an NGO of which Kasaona is now the director. One of the founders of IRDNC, a conservationist named Gareth Owen-Smith, formed the idea for the game guard system in tandem with the local Herero herdsmen.

 

"He discovered that these elders didn't want to see the end of wildlife any more than he did," remarks IRDNC's co-founder, Margaret Jacobsohn. "It might not make sense from an outside perspective, but from a local perspective, these are the men who know and enjoy being in the bush. But now they're earning an income from being there."...

 

 

 

 

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50,000 lost in 2011? Pangolin Trade Betrays Apathy for Biodiversity

50,000 lost in 2011? Pangolin Trade Betrays Apathy for Biodiversity | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

KARACHI, Pakistan, Oct 10 2012 (IPS) - Conservationists see the decimation of pangolins (scaly anteaters) in Pakistan as a sign of the callousness with which this country’s rich biodiversity is being traded away for commercial gain.

 

Tariq Mahmood, assistant professor at the University of Arid Agriculture, Rawalpindi, tells IPS that if the illegal trade in pangolins – prized for their scales and meat – is not stemmed, the animal may well go extinct within the next few decades.

 

Between December 2011 and March 2012, Mahmood’s team of researchers recovered 50 pangolin carcasses in the Potohar district of Punjab province alone.

 

International trade in Asian pangolin species is banned under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, but with each animal fetching about 125 dollars, poachers supplying markets in China and Southeast Asia are ready to take the risk.

 

In China, the main market for pangolins, the meat of the animal is considered a delicacy with the scales, blood and other parts used as ingredients in traditional medicine.

 

“People in Pakistan know pangolins only as a harmless animal and are unaware that the animal also saves crops and plants from insect pests,” says Ejaz Ahmad of the World Wide Fund-Pakistan (WWF-Pakistan). “With their super strong sense of smell, they can detect termites and ants from hundreds of metres away.”

 

“They are natural pest controllers,” Rhishja Cota-Larson of Project Pangolin (PP) told IPS. “One pangolin can consume an estimated 70 million insects per year.

 

“If pangolins disappear, you would need to increase the use of pesticides in order to control the insect population. This, in turn, would have adverse affects on the environment and on people,” she said.

 

“We know of pangolins being killed for their scales in Pakistan and their seizures occur on a regular basis in India and Nepal,” Cota-Larson added. The PP has noted similar incidents in Zimbabwe, Kenya, Mozambique and Uganda.

 

The insatiable demand may have wiped out around 50,000 pangolins worldwide in 2011, according to PP.... 

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Crimes Against Wildlife = Crimes Against Public

Crimes Against Wildlife = Crimes Against Public | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

TWIN FALLS • When a person commits a crime against another, someone calls police. When a home is burglarized, an alarm alerts the authorities.

 

But when a trophy bull elk is harvested out of season or a yearling moose is shot from a roadway, who reports it?

 

“We don’t have anybody to report to us when something bad happens to them,” said Gary Hompland, regional conservation officer for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

 

Welcome to the world of fish and wildlife crimes, where the victims are rarely human yet the crimes affect every Idahoan.

 

“They’re actually a crime against all the people of Idaho,” he said.

“All the citizens of Idaho own these animals.”

 

And the best way to catch these criminals, Hompland said, is by word of mouth.

 

“We have a public, sportsman or non-sportsman, who are genuinely concerned about Idaho’s natural resources,” he said.

 

“We rely on their eyes and ears when they’re out fishing, hunting or recreating.”...

 

 

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Wildlife activist Ofir Drori wins top WWF award

Wildlife activist Ofir Drori wins top WWF award | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

Ofir Drori - Israeli-born photojournalist, educator and anti-wildlife crime activist - has been awarded the prestigious WWF Duke of Edinburgh Conservation Medal* for 2012....

 

A tireless anti-corruption whistleblower and law enforcement activist, 36-year-old Ofir Drori works on the frontlines of endangered wildlife protection in West and Central Africa.

 

Ofir arrived in Cameroon a decade ago where he founded the Last Great Ape Organization (LAGA), the first wildlife law enforcement NGO in Africa.

 

Within seven months, Ofir and LAGA had brought about Cameroon’s first wildlife crime prosecution, providing a model that is now being replicated in West and Central Africa.

 

He's also founder-director of the Central Africa Wildlife Law Enforcement Network....

 

http://www.wwf.org.uk/news_feed.cfm?6271/Wildlife-activist-Ofir-Drori-wins-top-WWF-award 

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From poacher to conservationist

More on the illegal wildlife trade: http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/species/problems/illegal_trade/ Désiré Deontegeo, who used to be a poacher in the ra...
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Warner Bros Working On Dual Pics On Animal Poaching And Trafficking

Warner Bros Working On Dual Pics On Animal Poaching And Trafficking | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Warner Bros is working on not one but two high-profile films about the illegal poaching and trafficking in endangered animals around the world.

 

Both projects are being produced by Tobey Maguire‘s Material Pictures, Leonardo DiCaprio‘s Appian Way and Tom Hardy‘s Executive Options...

 

The first project is being written by Up In The Air co-writer Sheldon Turner as a star vehicle for Hardy, based on an idea by the Dark Knight Rises and Warrior star. The untitled film is set in Africa and the aim is for Hardy to play a former Special Forces soldier who signs on with a friend to work in the bush, training rangers to fight off the poachers decimating the rhino and elephant populations in Zimbabwe...

 

The second film is also untitled and is best described as a Traffic-like dissection of the trafficking industry that exploits the global market for illicit parts from slain animals that are used as aphrodisiacs and other ridiculous purposes...

 

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Mozambique tightening controls on wildlife trafficking

Just in from our INTEL source:

 

A North Korean has been arrested with $133 000 in cash, processed ivory, he is apparently also linked to Abelone, at first the initial report was that he was caught with $133 million Dollars, anyway seems like Mozambique are definitely finally tightening up controls. this morning another arrest was made in Western Mozambique, by Mozambique Police of two rhino poachers, with horns of poached rhinos in their possession so lets hope this continues, two rhinos were struck by lightning in North West province, when carcasses were found, horns had been removed by persons unknown.

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Endangered animals caught in the tourist trap

Endangered animals caught in the tourist trap | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Wildlife tourism generates conservation cash that many at-risk species now rely on to a startling degree.

 

INDIA is home to the largest remaining wild populations of the tiger. Even so, there are estimated to be just 1500 to 2000 Bengal tigers left. They are the poster species of the country's tourism marketing - the face of its national pride. So no wonder a legal bid to ban visitors from the heart of conservation zones, with its potential impact on income, has reignited the debate over the connections between wildlife tourism and conservation.

 

The once far-flung realm of our planet's largest cat species has been squeezed to a few poorly connected areas - mainly public, protected zones. All are under pressure. Some subspecies are already extinct in the wild, and others risk going the same way.

 

All are the unrelenting target of poachers controlled by gangs that supply the trade in tiger parts for traditional "medicine" in China and South-East Asia....

 

Yet crucially, parks agencies and local communities have become dependent on tourism funding, and much of it pays for work that keeps poachers at bay - the key conservation concern for Bengal tigers. In the principal tiger state of Madhya Pradesh, which arguably leads the way in its management of nature reserves, tourism revenue is used to fund programmes for local villagers, who act as gatekeepers against poachers. These villagers also have an effect on tigers, but neither they nor the tourists are nearly as severe a threat as poaching. Revenues there also fund anti-poaching patrols, compensate villagers for livestock killed by tigers, and pay for fence construction and other programmes. One tour operator has also helped reintroduce tigers. In other states, however, parks do not receive tourism cash and suffer more severe impacts from hunters. Simply put, if tourism money is cut abruptly, poaching will increase.

 

Visitors who come to see tigers bring their own problems, but these can be mitigated. Even in the best of Madhya Pradesh's reserves, such as Bandhavgarh, Pench and Kanha, there are day-to-day difficulties. The main problem is inappropriate driving by tour operators as they compete aggressively for tips from wealthy middle-class domestic tourists. This leads to breaches of minimal-impact wildlife-watching protocols, which aim to restrict vehicle speeds, animal-approach distances and crowding....

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China arrests 11 for poaching endangered animals

Police on Monday said they have arrested 11 people for allegedly poaching endangered animals in a central China virgin forest, and they also seized a large number of bear parts and antelope corpses....

 

CHANGSHA - Police on Monday said they have arrested 11 people for allegedly poaching endangered animals in a central China virgin forest, and they also seized a large number of bear parts and antelope corpses.

 

A joint operation by police in Hubei and Hunan provinces found that the suspects used electric nets to illegally trap endangered animals in the Shimen Forests near Wufenghouhe Nature Reserve on the border of the two provinces.

 

Seventeen bear paws, five bear gall bladders and more than 300 kg of bear meat, as well as musk deer skins and antelope corpses, were seized by police. Police are still pursuing five other suspects, Hunan police officials said.

 

Bear gall bladders and bear paws have been widely used as expensive ingredients in traditional Chinese medicine. While most bears are currently under adequate protection, huge profits drive poachers to break the law. Animal rights activists in recent years have called for alternatives to bear parts in traditional medicines.

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Cabinet pass wildlife and mineral bills to boost sectors

NAIROBI (Xinhua) -- Kenya’s Cabinet on Thursday passed wildlife and mineral bills and policies to speed up the conservation of the country’s wildlife resources and also to recognize the rapid expansion and importance of mining in the country.

A statement issued in Nairobi after the Cabinet meeting said the Wildlife Policy and Wildlife Bill 2012 will provide a comprehensive institutional framework for managing wildlife, human wildlife conflict, and compensation and ensures that wildlife is beneficial to those who live with the wildlife.

"The Bill establishes that the Kenya Wildlife and Forestry Regulatory Council; County Wildlife Conservation Committees; Wildlife Conservation Fund and restructures the Kenya Wildlife Services to fit within the new regulatory framework," the statement said.

Kenya wildlife enthusiasts have been banking on the passage of the new Wildlife Bill 2011 to reduce the rising cases of poaching in the East African nation.

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Officials’ appetite for rare animals hinders conservation effort

Officials’ appetite for rare animals hinders conservation effort | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Little headway made on conserving endangered species as officials and the rich love consuming them.

Stuffed tigers, bears and rhinos that could have been used as evidence to track down notorious wildlife traffickers have instead ended up in the residences of state officials.

Such cases are not rare in Vietnam, but they rarely make headlines.

Rich businessmen often use such products - prized for their unproven medicinal properties - to flaunt their wealth and cement good ties with government authorities, one outspoken lawmaker said.

“Nowadays, bribes for officials are disguised in the forms of not only gifts, luxury vacations and cars, but also rhino horns, bear bile, or tiger bone paste,” said Le Nhu Tien, vice chairman of the National Assembly’s Committee on Culture, Education, Youth, and Children.
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Panthera Report: Wildlife trade Crisis and solutions

Panthera Report: Wildlife trade Crisis and solutions | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
A new report published today by Panthera confirms that widespread illegal hunting and the bushmeat trade occur more frequently and with greater impact on wildlife populations in the Southern and Eastern savannas of Africa than previously thought, and if unaddressed could potentially cause a ‘conservation crisis.’ The report challenges previously held beliefs of the impact of illegal bushmeat hunting and trade in Africa with new data from experts.


While the bushmeat trade has long been recognized as a severe threat to the food resources of indigenous peoples and to wildlife populations in the forests of West and Central Africa, far less attention has been focused on the issue in African savannas, in part due to the misconception that illegal hunting for bushmeat in African savannas is a small-scale phenomenon practiced for subsistence living....

 

...the report highlights the impact of the bushmeat trade on food security within local communities. While the bushmeat trade currently contributes to household protein needs in many local regions, the practice is not sustainable, due to wasteful and unselective hunting methods, and a lack of regulation of harvest. By contrast, the report explains that regulated legal hunting of wildlife has the potential to sustainably generate massive quantities of meat protein for local households....

 

...the report outlines a variety of solutions required to mitigate illegal bushmeat hunting and trade, including: land use planning to ensure retention of wilderness areas far from human populations; measures to enable communities to benefit legally from wildlife in a sustainable way; improved legal protection of wildlife and law enforcement; the provision of alternative livelihoods and food sources; and measures to reduce the availability of wire to create snares.
 

Read more at http://scienceblog.com/57129/illegal-hunting-wildlife-trade-may-cause-conservation-crisis/#WgoEGhipSKduIQMg.99 

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Where's My Mama campaign asks Vietnamese to consider impact of their purchases on Bears and Rhinos

Where's My Mama campaign asks Vietnamese to consider impact of their purchases on Bears and Rhinos | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

by Traffic Southeast Asia on Thursday, October 11, 2012 at 7:03pm •

Shared with permission

 

The posters produced by The Body Shop and TRAFFIC Southeast Asia to raise awareness about the perils of the Bear bile and Rhino horn trade on these wildlife species
After a two-year run in Malaysia, TRAFFIC and The Body Shop have expanded their successful Where’s My Mama? campaign to Viet Nam, highlighting the plight of two iconic species threatened by the global illegal wildlife trade – the White Rhino and Asiatic Black Bear. The campaign that draws attention to the countless wild animals orphaned when their mothers are killed or poached for the illegal wildlife trade was first launched in Malaysia in 2011.


The campaign launched in Viet Nam on October 4th, in conjunction with World Animal Day and focuses on the illegal slaughter of these threatened species to feed the demand for traditional medicine products and the plight of the young victims left in the wake of this mindless killing and illicit trade.


The campaign urges consumers in Viet Nam – major users of rhino horn and bear bile - to consider the impact their purchases have these species. The White Rhino, the largest of the world’s five Rhino species, faces tremendous poaching pressure, especially in South Africa.

 

Illegal hunting and trade in this species is fuelled by Asia’s demand for the animal’s horn. Historically horn had limited use used in traditional medicine. More recently, however, consumption has skyrocketed on new beliefs that horn has broad detoxifying properties and on users’ desires to show status and wealth. Many of the slain rhinos are mothers with calves, leaving countless young rhinos orphaned, defenceless and with little chance of survival.


“It is important that greater action is taken in Viet Nam to detect, arrest and prosecute sellers and consumers of illegal wildlife products, including those trading in rhino horn and bear products. The Body Shop is taking an important step to help raise awareness of this important issue with the greater public in Viet Nam. This should be seen as a starting point for greater social and political effort to combat this situation” said Dr. Naomi Doak, Coordinator of TRAFFIC’s Southeast Asia-Greater Mekong Programme.


Asiatic Black Bears are illegally killed, hunted for their gall bladder, their meat and body parts. Bear gall bladder and bile are common ingredients in traditional medicine treatments. Orphaned cubs are captured for the pet trade, to be put on display in zoos or are caged in bear farms for years where their bile is harvested cruelly for use in traditional medicines. This practice persists in spite of readily available herbal-based alternatives.


Messages on The Body Shop bags will urge the public to stop using products containing parts of these two threatened species, and to report illegal wildlife trade to the Wildlife Crime Hotline 1800 1522 run by Education for Nature Viet Nam (ENV).


The Body Shop has always been an advocate of Animal Protection. Being the first cosmetic company in the world to not test on animals, this cosmetic company continues its fight to protect the planet with various campaigns and awareness programmes. “Animal protection is not something new to us. The Body Shop was after all the first beauty and cosmetic company to ban animal testing in our products. Since, we have come a long way in trying hard to protect our planet and in ensuring that the animals in it see the light of day. At The Body Shop, not only are all our products 100 % Vegetarian, but we choose to use our brand as an advocate to raise awareness about wildlife trafficking and how the public can make a difference to put an end to this,” explains Datin Mina Cheah-Foong, Managing Director of The Body Shop, Viet Nam.


The “Where’s My Mama” campaign runs on www.facebook.com/Trafficsea  and in The Body Shop stores in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City.

 

The Body Shop paper bags also carry the messages of the campaign
For more information, please contact:
Brett Tolman, Communications Officer, TRAFFIC–Greater Mekong Programme Tel. +84 4 3726 5026, E-mail: brett.tolman@traffic.org 
Loshini Catherine John, Marketing, Values & Communications Manager, The Body Shop (West Malaysia) loshini.john@thebodyshop.com.my 

 

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UNODC: Wildlife Trafficking New Form Of Organised Crime

Illicit wildlife trafficking is a new form of transnational organised crime which needs a greater response, the UNODC has warned.

 

This was concurred by governments who gathered in Vienna, Austria from Oct 15 to 19 this year for a meeting organised by the UNODC.....

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Trafficking, Hunting, Conservation and other critical Wildlife topics

Trafficking, Hunting, Conservation and other critical Wildlife topics | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

E-BOOKS FREE FROM NIKELA WITH H.A.N.D.S.

 

In our first joint venture, H.A.N.D.S. is partnering with Nikela, one of our favorite small NGOs, with South African roots and a passionate conservationist spirit. Nikela's mission is
"Protect Now and Educate for the Future" through special.

 

H.A.N.D.S. - HABITAT ACTION NETWORK DEFENSE & SUPPORT - is a collective of key activists in the field and around the world, collaborating to make a real difference in protecting and promoting habitats, species, and peoples.

 

Nikela brings FREE eBooks and eReports by those who make a difference for endangered and threatened species:

 

People like Chris Mercer, Dr. William Fowlds, Dr. Pieter Kat, Margot Stewart, and others who protect, advocate and make things happen for rhino, lions, primates, birds of prey and other endangered and threatened wildlife in Africa.

 

Some of this information is not found anywhere else and is provided at no cost to you in hopes that it will inspire and motivate you to get involved.

http://www.nikela.org/ebooks  ;

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Rhino poacher arrested in Assam, confesses to militants' involvement

Rhino poacher arrested in Assam, confesses to militants' involvement | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Since June floods devastated Assam, animals trying to escape the rising waters in Kaziranga National Park have fallen prey to hunters, poachers and speeding vehicles. More than 700 animals have died since then and more carcasses are being revealed as the waters go down.

 

But there's another threat, particularly to rhinos, that won't recede with the water. It is from the armed militant separatist outfits in the area.

 

The biggest clue to this came after the arrest of one Lindok Rongpi yesterday, who confessed before a magistrate that he poached six rhinos under the instructions of Songja Timung, self-styled defence secretary of Kuki National Liberation Front, one of the armed outfits from Karbianglong in Assam, now in a ceasefire agreement....

 

http://www.ndtv.com/article/india/rhino-poacher-arrested-in-assam-confesses-to-militants-involvement-283686 

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China hosts first Environmental Security Seminar with INTERPOL

China hosts first Environmental Security Seminar with INTERPOL | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
China hosts its first National Environmental Security Seminar with INTERPOL support

 

BEIJING, China ‒ International efforts to develop a cooperative and collaborative multi-agency strategy to tackle environmental crime received a boost after China hosted its first National Environmental Security Seminar with the support of INTERPOL.

 

At the meeting China announced it would seek out and develop opportunities to enhance its international environmental enforcement efforts in cooperation with INTERPOL. To take this initiative further, it was agreed that an expanded meeting will be organized involving all Chinese Divisions and Ministries responsible for environmental law enforcement.

 

Following the official launch by INTERPOL’s Environmental Crime Programme of its National Environmental Security Task Force (NEST) initiative in September, Chinese authorities decided to organize a National Environmental Security Seminar with INTERPOL and invited the head of INTERPOL’s Environmental Crime Programme, David Higgins, who welcomed their initiative.

 

“China has set a good example for the entire international environmental compliance and enforcement community and we look forward to forging closer ties and working alongside China in our common endeavour to prevent environmental crime and enhance environmental security,” said Mr Higgins.

 

Critical issues such as the survival of wild tigers and the protection of forest were on the agenda, together with INTERPOL initiatives such as Project PREDATOR and Project LEAF, which are actively supported by the US Agency for International Development, the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation and the UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

 

The meeting, hosted by the Ministry of Public Security at the INTERPOL National Central Bureau in Beijing, was attended by representatives from the following Chinese government agencies and departments:

 

INTERPOL Division, International Cooperation Department, Ministry of Public Security
Firearms Administration Division, Public Order Administration Department, Ministry of Public Security
Criminal Investigation Division, Forestry Public Security Bureau of State Forestry Administration
Wild Animal and Plant Administration Division, Wildlife Protection Department, SFA
Intelligence Division, Anti-smuggling Department, The General Administration of Customs
Law Enforcement Division, CITES Management Authority of China
Wild Animal and Aquatic Plant Protection Division, Fishery Command Centre, Ministry of Agriculture

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Judge sentences men for poaching Colorado black bear

Judge sentences men for poaching Colorado black bear | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Two men from Tennessee were sentenced in Garfield County Court earlier this month for their role in a felony, bear poaching incident in August.

 

Officer says hunters removed all four of the bears' paws as souvenirs

 

Harley Boss Manley, 51, of Martin, Tenn., pleaded guilty to a charge of killing a black bear before Sept. 1, which marks the start of the bear hunting season each fall. He was given a mandatory five-year suspension of his hunting privileges, a two-year deferred prison sentence for felony willful destruction, forfeit his bow, ordered to pay a fine of $4,000 and donate $6,000 to Operation Game Thief, a Colorado tip line for wildlife infractions. In addition, the Garfield County judge ordered that Manley be placed under supervised probation.

 

David Ronnie Coleman, 62, of Union City, Tenn., also pleaded guilty to killing a black bear before Sept. 1, and received a mandatory five-year suspension of his hunting privileges. He was fined $3,000 and ordered to donate $4,000 to OGT....

 

 

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Pronghorn poaching discovered in Falcon

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is asking for help solving a poaching crime. Wildlife officers found three pronghorn antelope in a construction dumpster on Torreys Peak Way in Falcon on Tuesday, Oct. 9.
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25 Endangered Animal Species on Brink of Extinction

25 Endangered Animal Species on Brink of  Extinction | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Twenty-five primates are on the brink of extinction, according to a newly released study.

 

Species of monkeys, langurs, lemurs and gorillas are in danger due to illegal trafficking and deforestation, according to a recent article by the Associated Press.

 

Conservation efforts have helped save several species from the endangered list.


Lemurs, the article said, are "severely threatened" by habitat destruction and illegal hunting, which has increased since the county's change of power in 2009. Only 19 known individual remain of the northern sportive lemur in Madagascar.


"Lemurs are now one of the world's most endangered groups of mammals...

 

Read more at http://www.latinospost.com/articles/5508/20121015/25-animal-species-brink-extinction.htm#IqGLteCQf9Uske8G.99 

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Hardy Françoise Ange's curator insight, October 5, 2014 9:35 AM

lemurs are so cute, don't let them disappear !

Hardy Françoise Ange's curator insight, October 5, 2014 9:42 AM

I love lemurs !

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Israeli hunter jailed for first time in 60-year history of anti-poaching law

Israeli hunter jailed for first time in 60-year history of anti-poaching law | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Haifa District Court sentences Rami Fahmawi to seven months in prison for hunting and confining a porcupine - a protected wild animal - without a permit.
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US Deputy Sec. of State Burns calls for stop to wildlife trafficking

U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns urges better education and cooperation to stop illegal wildlife trafficking worldwide

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Officials’ appetite for rare animals hinders conservation effort

Officials’ appetite for rare animals hinders conservation effort | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Little headway made on conserving endangered species as officials and the rich love consuming them.

Stuffed tigers, bears and rhinos that could have been used as evidence to track down notorious wildlife traffickers have instead ended up in the residences of state officials.

Such cases are not rare in Vietnam, but they rarely make headlines.

Rich businessmen often use such products - prized for their unproven medicinal properties - to flaunt their wealth and cement good ties with government authorities, one outspoken lawmaker said.

“Nowadays, bribes for officials are disguised in the forms of not only gifts, luxury vacations and cars, but also rhino horns, bear bile, or tiger bone paste,” said Le Nhu Tien, vice chairman of the National Assembly’s Committee on Culture, Education, Youth, and Children.
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Tanzania seeks support from US to protect wildlife parks from poachers

Tanzania seeks support from US to protect wildlife parks from poachers | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
TANZANIA (eTN) - After meeting Tanzania’s Minister for Natural Resources and Tourism, Mr. Khamis Kagasheki, in Washington this week, Deputy Secretary of the US Department of the Interior, David Hayes, said American government will be helping Tanzania in fighting poaching incidences through logistical and technical support.

 

Hayes told the Tanzanian delegation led by Mr. Kagasheki at the Department’s Headquarters that his government is ready to work closely with Tanzania, because issues of natural resources are now facing global challenges, which need to be addressed immediately with various stakeholders.

 

“[The] US has a responsibility of fostering [a] cordial relationship with Tanzania so as to ensure sustainability of natural resources in the country,” said Secretary Hayes....

 

http://www.eturbonews.com/31681/tanzania-seeks-support-us-protect-wildlife-parks ;

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Shangai: Reptile poachers penalised

Imphal, October 11 2012: Cracking down against poaching of endangered animals, the court of Chief Judicial Magistrate, Thoubal has today imposed a penalty of Rs 10,000 each against two reptile poachers who were apprehended yesterday while transporting 30 Tokay Geckos.

 

The reptile species is considered to be rare and highly endangered but there had been a spurt in its poaching and trading for a mature reptile reportedly commands a high price in some of the South East Asian countries....

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