Wildlife Traffick...
Follow
Find
12.1K views | +0 today
Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it?
Following the Animal Poaching Trail in Africa and the World
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Inside the Lucrative World of Wildlife Trafficking

Inside the Lucrative World of Wildlife Trafficking | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
 Wildlife trafficking is estimated to be a $10 billion-a-year business fueled by people who want to own exotic pets that belong back in the forests and waterways they are illegally taken from.

 

Wildlife trafficking is estimated to be a $10 billion-a-year business fueled by people who want to own exotic pets that belong back in the forests and waterways they are illegally taken from.

 

Tourism is big business in Africa. In Tanzania alone, the “tourism sector earned $1.471 billion in the year to June, making it the second biggest source of foreign currency after gold,” says Reuters.“Tanzania’s sweeping savanna plains in the shadow of Mount Kilimanjaro, Africa’s highest peak, teem with wildlife, drawing tourists who pay hundreds of dollars a night to stay in luxury tented camps.”

 

Unfortunately, trading in animals is also big business and recently Reuters reported that, “Tanzania has sacked the most senior official responsible for managing its wildlife and two others over the illegal export of more than 100 live animals and birds from the east African nation’s game parks, local media reported on Tuesday.”

And this is not a new problem for the country. “Members of parliament last year accused senior wildlife officials of smuggling giraffes, impalas, gazelles, hornbills, vultures and other rare wildlife out of the country.”

 

But this is also a worldwide dilemma. In 2009, Smithsonian said, “Wildlife trafficking is thought to be the third most valuable illicit commerce in the world, after drugs and weapons, worth an estimated $10 billion a year, according to the U.S. State Department.

 

Birds are the most common contraband; the State Department estimates that two million to five million wild birds, from hummingbirds to parrots to harpy eagles, are traded illegally worldwide every year. Millions of turtles, crocodiles, snakes and other reptiles are also trafficked, as well as mammals and insects.”

Read the rest of this article at http://www.takepart.com/article/2012/08/15/heartbreaking-and-highly-profitable-world-wildlife-trafficking 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

LMI: Asia’s Regional Response to Endangered Species Trafficking

LMI: Asia’s Regional Response to Endangered Species Trafficking | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

BACKGROUND

The illegal wildlife trade is a multi-billion dollar business threatening the Lower Mekong region's unique ecosystems and robbing the people who depend on them from the benefits they provide. It presents both security and economic threats by undermining law enforcement, strengthening criminal syndicates and raising the risk of diseases being transmitted from animals to humans. Illegal traffickers are well organized. They prey on endangered species, move them across borders and sell them around the world.

 

USAID's program to counter illegal wildlife trafficking began in 2005 with the establishment of the ASEAN Wildlife Enforcement Network (ASEAN-WEN). The network has achieved significant outcomes that include:

 

 Training more than 2,200 officials in anti-poaching operations and wildlife crime investigations;

 Increasing the amount of illegal wildlife seizures and associated arrests by ten-fold in just four years;

 Establishing a fully functioning secretariat in Bangkok; and

 Creating National Task Forces to combat wildlife crime in Lower Mekong Initiative (LMI) countries—Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam—and in almost every ASEAN country.

ASEAN member governments recognize the importance of wildlife trafficking and have committed the financial and human resources essential to enforcing legislation governing wildlife conservation, trade and sustainable use of wild fauna and flora. Likewise, they have agreed to implement regional commitments to ASEAN-WEN focusing on cross border collaboration on wildlife crime cases.

 

APPROACH

Target Countries: Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam

USAID’s five-year program, Asia’s Regional Response to Endangered Species Trafficking (ARREST), began in April 2011 and builds on the success of ASEAN-WEN. Implemented by the FREELAND Foundation, ARREST unites the efforts of government and the private sector (profit and non profit) to fight trafficking of illegal wildlife in Asia by reducing consumer demand, strengthening law enforcement and improving regional cooperation. ARREST focuses on LMI countries and shares its lessons with China and South Asian counterparts.

 

ACTIVITIES

Operating demand reduction campaigns: ARREST uses its extensive media and advertising resources to support awareness campaigns in Vietnam, Laos, Thailand and other countries to decrease the demand for illegal wildlife products. To date, ARREST messaging campaigns in the Lower Mekong region have reached more than half a million individuals through online sources and television, and through public awareness products placed in airports and at border crossings.

 

Elevating and building law enforcement capacity: ARREST places wildlife crime on the agenda of major national and regional law enforcement organizations, such as INTERPOL and ASEANAPOL (the ASEAN region’s police network). ARREST supports these efforts and helps police chiefs across the Lower Mekong region incorporate cross-border wildlife enforcement cooperation into their work plans. ARREST also works with law enforcement trainers in the region to develop training courses in wildlife crime prevention, detection and prosecution.

 

Supporting the ASEAN-WEN Secretariat: ARREST program experts mentor staff from ASEAN-WEN’s Bangkok-based Program Coordination Unit, and share new technologies to raise law enforcement awareness. This creates a stronger, more independent and service-oriented secretariat that connects directly with law enforcement agencies across the Lower Mekong region and in other countries. Promoting regional cooperation: Through regional events such as knowledge exchanges, regional investigation meetings and training courses, law enforcement officers from the Lower Mekong countries share information, intelligence and best practices with the new South Asian Wildlife Enforcement Network (SA-WEN), China’s Task Force and ASEAN-WEN. PARTNERS Implementing Partner: FREELAND Foundation

Cooperating Partners: ASEAN-WEN, ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity, ACRES, AsiaWorks TV, Conservation International China Program, Education for Nature Vietnam (ENV), International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), INTERPOL, JWT, National Geographic Channel, MTV EXIT, Wildlife Alliance, U.S. Department of State, U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Poachers' paradise

Poachers' paradise | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Decades of spirited work and multi-million kwacha investment to restock the Liwonde National Park are now being repaid with massive plunder of the world renowned eco-tourist attraction.

 

http://www.bnltimes.com/index.php/malawi-news/headlines/national/11426-poachers-paradise ;

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

WWF launches fight against wildlife crime

WWF launches fight against wildlife crime | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

In response to record poaching rates, WWF today is launching a global campaign calling governments to combat illegal wildlife trade and reduce demand for illicit endangered species products....

 

“Governments are largely ignoring the crisis affecting our endangered species. Throughout our global campaign, countries will hear directly from their constituents that the people expect better from them. The time to act is now while we can still save rhinos, tigers and elephants,” said Lasse Gustavsson, Executive Director of Conservation for WWF International....

 

http://vietnam.panda.org/?206051/WWF-launches-fight-against-wildlife-crime 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

University of Washington professor tracking down elephant poachers

University of Washington professor tracking down elephant poachers | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
When poachers slaughtered 300 elephants this year in Cameroon, all they wanted was the ivory tusks. Now, all a University of Washington professor wants is to help bring the poachers to justice.

 

Wasser is an expert on endangered animal scat. He has made several discoveries using specially trained dogs to sniff out dung of animals that Wasser then analyzes. He can find out what the animal eats, if it is healthy, even if its hormonally stressed.

 

Wasser and his crew have collected dung samples from the elephants herds of Africa.

 

Give him a dung sample and he can tell you which herd it came from, where they are and how they are doing. Give him a sample of seized, illegal ivory and he can match the DNA to a dung sample and bingo, he knows where the ivory tusk came from.

 

If he gets the samples early enough, Wasser says he can alert rangers that poachers are operating in their area....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Featured video: a Sumatran rhino love story

Featured video: a Sumatran rhino love story | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Efforts to save the Sumatran rhino in Borneo have sped up ever since the capture of Puntung last Christmas.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Wildlife-Trafficking Bust Highlights Problems in Caged Bird Trade

Wildlife-Trafficking Bust Highlights Problems in Caged Bird Trade | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

Environmental crime officials cracked down on wildlife trafficking between Latin America and Europe this summer, seizing more than 8,700 contraband animals in an Interpol bust dubbed Operation Cage. Authorities arrested nearly 4,000 people during raids on coastal ports, airports, post offices, markets, pet stores, and taxidermists in 32 countries. The sting focused on South and Central American birds, but it also uncovered illegally traded mammals, reptiles, fish, and insects—along with guns, ammunition, trapping equipment, and animal products such as elephant ivory....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Animal poisoning on the rise in Chiredzi SW Africa

Animal poisoning on the rise in Chiredzi SW Africa | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Poisoning of animals in the Chiredzi River Conservancy is on the rise, with no legal action being taken against the known poachers responsible.

 

SW Radio Africa has been told that the carcasses of scores of animals have been found in recent weeks, adding to the growing numbers of wildlife who have suffered a similar fate in recent years.

 

The people responsible are known poachers in the Conservancy who have previously been caught by police. But their cases have never been heard because the police either release them from custody, or their dockets go ‘missing’.

 

Johnny Rodrigues, the chairman of the Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force, told SW Radio Africa on Thursday that poison is also being used as an “intimidatory tactic” by people trying to force the legitimate owners of conservancy land to handover their properties. He said it forms part of the larger problem that conservancy land is being targeted for ‘reform’, despite this being illegal.

 

“The acts are there to protect the animals and the conservancies, but there is no one to apply these laws. Now you’ve got a scenario where the guardians of the country’s wildlife have sanctioned hunting and are giving licences to trigger happy people who don’t know anything about hunting and ultimately it is the animals that suffer,” Rodrigues said.

 

Hunting licences in the Save Valley Conservancy have been handed out to top ZANU PF officials, as part of what Rodrigues says is “appeasement by the government where the party faithful are rewarded.”

 

An international tourism conference is supposed to get underway in Victoria Falls next month. But Rodrigues said the worsening poaching and the ongoing seizure of conservancy land makes it “embarrassing” that Zimbabwe is the host.

 

To contact this journalist email alex@swradioafrica.com or follow on Twitter @albell88

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

South Africa: Corruption Destabilises Democracy - Premier Modise

South Africa: Corruption Destabilises Democracy - Premier Modise | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Corruption is a disabler that destabilises democracy and democratic institutions as it slows economic development and hampers service delivery says North West Premier, Mme Thandi Modise.

 

Speaking at the opening of the two-day Provincial Anti-Corruption Round table discussion that commenced in Potchefstroom on Thursday, Premier Modise vowed that her administration will intensify its fight against corrupt elite networks in order to win the battle against greed and corruption.

 

"It is highly disappointing that scandals involving public officials are common in the South Africa.Everyday people are debating and complaining about outright corruption, lack of ethics, transparency, integrity and unprofessional behavior in government....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

The Heartbreaking and Highly Profitable World of Wildlife Trafficking

The Heartbreaking and Highly Profitable World of Wildlife Trafficking | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
It’s a $10 billion-a-year business with no end in sight.

 

Tourism is big business in Africa. In Tanzania alone, the “tourism sector earned $1.471 billion in the year to June, making it the second biggest source of foreign currency after gold,” says Reuters. “Tanzania’s sweeping savanna plains in the shadow of Mount Kilimanjaro, Africa's highest peak, teem with wildlife, drawing tourists who pay hundreds of dollars a night to stay in luxury tented camps.”

 

Unfortunately, trading in animals is also big business and yesterday Reuters reported that, “Tanzania has sacked the most senior official responsible for managing its wildlife and two others over the illegal export of more than 100 live animals and birds from the east African nation's game parks, local media reported on Tuesday.”...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Kenya: Wildlife Service Launches Own Lab to Fight Poaching

The Kenya Wildlife Service yesterday launched a forensic and genetic laboratory to enhance its fight against poaching. Speaking during the launch of the first phase of the laboratory which will cost Sh60 million, KWS director Julius Kipng'etich said the facility is a key milestone that will strengthen investigations.

 

The complete project is estimated to cost Sh110 million.

 

Kipng'etich said KWS will work with the CID to adduced scientific evidence to prosecute poachers. "The University of Washington has been doing it (tests) for us. We were forced to travel all the way to the US but now we will be able to tell the difference between donkey meat, dog meat, gazelle and any other animal," he said.

 

Attorney General Githu Muigai who launched the laboratory said that the new constitution raises the threshold for evidence required in court and that the scientific proven evidence will help the courts determine the truth. "The wildlife Bill is at an advanced stage and it will be presented to before parliament soon," he said.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Corruption: Why kingpins of Far Eastern wildlife crime can’t be caged

DESPITE a series of arrests and seizures, senior ­police in Thailand claim endemic corruption is making it impossible to ­prosecute those behind a multi-million pound trade in illegally trafficked wildlife....

 

 “It is very difficult for me. I have to sit among people who are both good and some who are corrupt, said Chanvut Vaj­rabukka, a retired police general. “If I say, ‘You have to go out and arrest that target,’ some in the room may well warn them,” said Mr Vajrabukka, who now advises the Association of South-East Asian Nations’ Wildlife Enforcement Network (Asean-Wen)....

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Yao Ming Travels to Africa to Help Fight Poaching

Yao Ming Travels to Africa to Help Fight Poaching | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Yao Ming travels to a wildlife sanctuary in Africa, as part of his documentary raising awareness of poaching of endangered species.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Illegal wildlife trading in internet's deepest, darkest corners

Illegal wildlife trading in internet's deepest, darkest corners | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Organised wildlife criminals are using online tools more commonly associated with serious financial crime, drug trafficking and child pornography...

 

A report due to be published later this year concludes that a growing proportion of wildlife crime is using "deep web" tools more commonly associated with serious financial criminals, drug traffickers and child pornographers.

 

"The internet has without a doubt facilitated the huge expansion of illegal international wildlife trading over the last decade," said Crawford Allan, of the wildlife trade monitoring network Traffic. "Rare jewels of the forest can now be caught, boxed and shipped almost overnight just like any other express commodity."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Bangladesh suspends officials over tiger smuggling

Bangladesh said on Monday that nine forest officials had been suspended for "gross negligence" after three Bengal tiger cubs were found in a house in Dhaka where they were being kept by smugglers.


Bangladesh's elite Rapid Action Battalion (RAB) rescued the two-month-old cubs in June after a tip-off that the endangered animals from the Sundarbans mangrove forest were in cages at the house ready to be sold.


The raid raised alarm over the safety of about 400 tigers living in the Bangladeshi part of the 4,000-square-mile coastal forest straddling the border with India.

 

Read more: http://india.nydailynews.com/newsarticle/5044d4a9c110c0564b000001/bangladesh-suspends-officials-over-tiger-smuggling#ixzz25RAgpIdE ;

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

World Bank’s Approach to Environmental Crime

World Bank’s Approach to Environmental Crime | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
With an estimated $78.5 billion market, wildlife crime has attracted organized criminal network.

 

But the World Bank is helping its clients curb this illicit activity by placing an increased focus on law enforcement.


In South Africa, a full-fledged crisis is underway: This year alone, poachers are going to shoot some 600 rhinoceroses and saw off their horns. Through organized criminal networks, they will smuggle the horns to East Asia, where the rhino horn sells for a price higher than gold in the traditional Chinese medicine market. As a result, the previously recovering population of rhinoceroses is at risk of backing its way to the brink....

 

http://inaudit.com/featured/world-bank%E2%80%99s-approach-to-environmental-crime-24183/ ;

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Leonardo DiCaprio, Tobey Maguire and Tom Hardy Plan an Anti-Poaching Movie

Leonardo DiCaprio, Tobey Maguire and Tom Hardy Plan an Anti-Poaching Movie | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
The trio is set to produce the animal rights-themed drama, which comes from Hardy's idea and is designed in the vein of Steven Soderbergh's 'Traffic'.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Peru Seizes 16,000 Dried Seahorses

Peru Seizes 16,000 Dried Seahorses | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Authorities in Peru seized thousands of dried seahorses destined for sale in Asia, illustrating the South American country's status as a wildlife trafficking hub and Asia's insatiable appetite for exotic remedies and aphrodisiacs.

 

On August 23, Peruvian authorities seized the over 16,000 dried seahorses from wildlife traffickers in Lima, BBC reported. Police confiscated the three cases carrying the seahorses after the traffickers dropped them in the street and fled the scene. According to Police chief Victor Fernandez, the seahorses would have earned the traffickers up to $250,000 abroad.

 

The seahorses, which breed along Peru’s north Pacific coast, are protected by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). Seahorse fishing has been banned in Peru since 2004 and is punishable by two to five years in prison.

 

InSight Crime Analysis
Dried seahorses are popular in Asian countries where they are used in traditional medicines and as a supposed aphrodisiac. High demand for seahorse powder makes the trade profitable for traffickers, despite bans. In 2011 alone, Peruvian authorities seized two tons of seahorses destined for export, according to the AFP.

In addition to being a popular source of black market seahorses, Peru is also the source of other exotic animals. In 2009, Chilean authorities captured a boat carrying hundreds of live animals, including toucans and crocodiles, from Peru that were destined for illegal sale.

 

According to Global Financial Integrity, a branch of the Center for International Policy, the illegal wildlife trade earns traffickers an estimated $7.8 to $10 billion annually. However, many countries do not have sufficient resources to crack down on the trade, which is especially difficult to monitor in largely remote areas where many of the exotic species are found.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

VIDEO: Save Wildlife with Your PB'nJ and Nikela

Many thanks to Shawn, Nicky, Wilberth, Denise, and Melissa. Students at the University of Texas in Austin. When this video first went live it had over 3,000 ...

 

A novel idea to save wildlife without spending a penny!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Video: Zoo conservation raise debate CNN

Will Travers OBE appeared live on CNN to argue the case for keeping wildlife in the wild. But what do you think?
more...
Rebekah Tauritz's curator insight, October 17, 2013 3:23 PM

What are zoos and aquaria around the world contributing to wildlife conservation, research and conservation advocacy? Two experts briefly share their opinions. Food for thought!

Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Retired Coweta teacher writes book with poaching theme

Retired Coweta County educator Menlia Moss Trammell has had her first book published.


“Rob and Rex Prevent a Poaching,” a paperback for children, was released in June by PublishAmerica. A book signing will be held Aug. 28 from 3-4:30 p.m. at Scott’s Bookstore in downtown Newnan.


Trammell got the idea of her first book from social studies and science lessons when she was teaching. “The kids always responded really well to animal stories and to units about endangered species,” she recalled....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Canada: Wildlife smuggling penalties need to be revisited

A good model when looking to tighten laws for smuggling wildlife is Canada’s drug law, which is based on the perceived harm of drugs.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

South Africa goes big on birth control for elephants

JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - A South African province home to thousands of elephants is planning a birth control campaign for the pachyderms to prevent a population explosion that could threaten plants and...

 

Unlike other parts of Africa where elephant stocks have dwindled to dangerously low levels due to poaching and a loss of habitat, South Africa has seen its populations steadily grow through conservation, with the country pressed for room to house the massive animals with hefty diets.

 

KwaZulu-Natal province, in the southeast, is looking to expand a project running for more than a decade where elephants populations have been controlled by injecting cows with a vaccine that triggers an immune system response to block sperm reception....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Asia's new delicacy: Africa's lion bones

Asia's new delicacy: Africa's lion bones | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

POTCHEFSTROOM, South Africa — Lion bones have become a hot commodity for their use in Asian traditional medicine, driving up exports from South Africa to the East and creating new fears of the survival of the species.


Conservationists are already angry over lion trophy hunting.
The skeletons are mostly shipped to Vietnam and Laos, feeding conservationists' fears that the market will drive up lion poaching -- just as the illegal hunting of rhinos escalates for their horns, also popular in Asian traditional remedies.


"Suddenly, and very recently, there are a great number of people from Laos who have a big interest for trophy hunting. And that had never happened in the whole history of Laos!" said Pieter Kat from conservation NGO LionAid....

 

...Asian hunters buy lion trophy hunting permits to get at the bones.
"They prefer hunting lionesses, whose $4,000 price tag is more affordable than the males," Kat told AFP.


Most swear it's about the trophy, which means safari operators and breeders can easily dispose of the carcass at the same time and make an extra buck.


A lion skeleton these days fetches up to $10,000.
A few hundred partial or complete lion skeletons were shipped out of the country in 2010, according to latest official figures -- all completely legal.


The trade started in 2008....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildlife Margrit
Scoop.it!

Thailand's Underworld Of Wildlife Trafficking

Thailand's Underworld Of Wildlife Trafficking | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

BANGKOK -- Squealing tiger cubs stuffed into carry-on bags. Luggage packed with hundreds of squirming tortoises, elephant tusks, even water dragons and American paddlefish....

 

It's a murky mix. A 10-fold increase in wildlife law enforcement actions, including seizures, has been reported in the past six years in Southeast Asia. Yet, the trade's Mr. Bigs, masterful in taking advantage of pervasive corruption, appear immune to arrest and continue to orchestrate the decimation of wildlife in Thailand, the region and beyond....

 

everal kingpins, says wildlife activist Steven Galster, have recently been confronted by authorities, "but in the end, good uniforms are running into, and often stopped by bad uniforms. It's like a bad Hollywood cop movie.

 

"Most high-level traffickers remain untouched and continue to replace arrested underlings with new ones," says Galster, who works for the FREELAND Foundation, an anti-trafficking group....

 

Recently, Lt. Col. Adtaphon Sudsai, a highly regarded, outspoken officer, was instructed to lay off what had seemed an open-and-shut case he cracked four years ago when he penetrated a gang along the Mekong River smuggling pangolin....

 

In another not uncommon case, a former Thai police officer who tried to crack down on traders at Bangkok's vast Chatuchak Market got a visit from a senior police general who told him to "chill it or get removed."...

 

Vietnam was singled out last month by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) as the top destination country for the highly-prized rhino horn.

 

Tens of thousands of birds, mostly parrots and cockatoos plucked from the wild, are being imported from the Solomon Islands into Singapore, often touted as one of Asia's least corrupt nations, in violation of CITES, the international convention on wildlife trade....

more...
No comment yet.