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Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it?
Following the Animal Poaching Trail in Africa and the World
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Organized Crime Trade Worth over US$30 Billion Responsible for up to 90% of Tropical Deforestation - UNEP

Organized Crime Trade Worth over US$30 Billion Responsible for up to 90% of Tropical Deforestation - UNEP | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Report Spotlights Almost 30 Ways of Procuring and Laundering Illegal Timber Compromising Security, Climate Mitigation and Sustainable Development Efforts...

 

Rome, 27 September 2012 - Between 50 to 90 per cent of logging in key tropical countries of the Amazon basin, Central Africa and South East Asia is being carried out by organized crime threatening efforts to combat climate change, deforestation, conserve wildlife and eradicate poverty.

 

Globally, illegal logging now accounts for between 15 and 30 per cent of the overall trade, according to a new report from the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) and INTERPOL....

 

Much of the laundering is made possible by large flows of investment funds based in the EU, US and Asia into companies involved in the crime, including in establishing plantation operations with the sole purpose of laundering illegally cut timber.

 

In many cases, corrupt officials, local military and police emerge with revenues up to ten times that available through available legal pursuits. This seriously undermines much needed investments in sustainable forest operations and alternative livelihood incentives....

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Four leopards a week being killed in India for skin

Four leopards a week being killed in India for skin | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

At least 2,300 leopards were killed and then their body parts trafficked between 2001 and 2010, the study estimates....

 

While India has struggled to protect its declining tiger population, its leopards have been getting even less protection, or attention for that matter. A study released Friday recognized that flaw, estimating that at least four leopards are being killed each week, double the official reports, with their skins then smuggled to parts of Asia.


"Even though reports of illegal trade in leopard body parts are disturbingly frequent, the level of threat to leopards in the country has previously been unrecognized, and has fallen into our collective 'blind spot'," study co-author Rashid Raza, the India coordinator for the TRAFFIC wildlife trade monitoring network...

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UN recognizes wildlife crime as threat to rule of law

UN recognizes wildlife crime as threat to rule of law | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
World leaders gathering in New York for the global body’s 67th annual meeting highlighted wildlife trafficking along with other severe threats to the rule of law such as corruption and drug running.
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Alleged organ traffickers held in Cameroon

Yaounde, Cameroon - Cameroon has arrested five nationals suspected of trafficking in human and animal organs, a local wildlife organisation told AFP on Monday.

 

“Three youths were arrested on Saturday morning in (the southern town of) Djoum after hiding human organs and elephant parts in a bag on their motor bike,” Eric Kaba Tah, spokesperson for The Last Great Ape Organisation Cameroon (Laga), told AFP.

 

“Among the human remains there was a skull with hair,” he added.

The trio, who were arrested while travelling in the south of the country, gave the names of two accomplices when interrogated by the police, and these two suspects were arrested on Sunday with help from Laga, the group said.

 

The investigation, which is still in its early stages, has already shown that the human organs and the elephant parts were to be handed over to “somebody very important in Yaounde”, the country's capital.

 

“Trafficking in animal species is always linked to other organised crimes but this is the first time that we see a link to human organ trafficking,” said Laga director Ofir Drori.

 

Mixing elephant meat and human body parts was “shocking”, he added.

 

In Central Africa, body parts are sometimes used in ceremonies where they are supposed to give special powers and bring success to their new owner.

 

They often come from dug-up bodies after funerals, but they are also known to come from people killed for such ceremonies.

 

Laga is the first wildlife law enforcement non-governmental organisation in Africa and works in close co-operation with governments, according to its website. - Sapa-AFP

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Endangered Gorillas Struggle To Survive Amid Growing Threats

Endangered Gorillas Struggle To Survive Amid Growing Threats | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
KINSHASA, Congo -- The plight of two infant gorillas, rescued after being kidnapped from their wild families, highlights the dangers confronting the endangered Grauer's gorillas that have become victims of ongoing violence and a new rebellion in eastern Congo.

A decision to allow oil exploration in a national park there may put the gorillas at greater risk.

 

Virunga National Park said Monday that wildlife authorities rescued two baby gorillas in the space of a week this month....

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Ethiopia: Rescuing Endangered Wildlife Calls for Urgency

Ethiopia: Rescuing Endangered Wildlife Calls for Urgency | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Ethiopia is a country endowed with precious, endemic wildlife, tremendous and marvelous natural resources, cascades, a range of tangible and intangible assets, among others.

 

Owing to its geographical variation, the country is being home to different types of fauna and flora. This means that Ethiopia is also rich in many unique plants and wild animals. Cognizant of the fact that the country does possess such a tremendous wildlife resource, it has become one of the members of the nations issued the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) since 1993....

 

James Isiche, Eastern Africa Regional Director for the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) in an exclusive interview with The Ethiopian Herald said that there have been numerous large seizures of illegal wildlife products originating from our borders.

 

Even they are transported from many parts of the continent to other areas. "Over the last one and half year, IFAW has noted that the criminal gangs involved in wildlife trafficking have become more brazen and have started using routes such as seaports and airports in Kenya and Tanzania that were no-go zones in the past,with the contraband mainly destined for Asia," he added.

He also said that law enforcement areas have a great contribution in the fight against these illegal poachers even if the operations are delicate and complicated. "They are increasingly becoming life threatening. And they can also be very frustrating.

 

Tragically, African countries operate either as sources of illegal wildlife and it's products or act as routes or conduits for the illegal trade. In some cases, they become both. The criminal gangs involved in this crime are well organized and use sophisticated smuggling methods....

 

"Yes, we have to work hard to facilitate conditions to move the community in harmony. Surprisingly, most of these poachers are from the local community. Sometimes they can supply the local community with money more than that of the federal institutions because they gain great deal of money through this illegal trade."...

 

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Dying for Ivory

Dying for Ivory | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Demand for ivory is fueling a war in which elephants and poachers are being slaughtered in growing numbers.

 

The latest casualty figures in the ancient war of man versus beast in Africa are in, and they look bad for both sides.

 

At least 25,000 elephants may have been slaughtered in Africa in 2011 — more than in any year since reporting began in 2002 — according to Kenneth Burnham, the statistician for Monitoring the Illegal Killing of Elephants, an intergovernmental research agency.

Hundreds of humans have also died as a result of the elephant slaughter — not just from scattered maulings or tramplings, but from bullets fired by other humans fighting on the animals’ behalf....

 

...curbing the demand for ivory is, in the end, the only way to curb both elephant and human deaths.

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Nat Geo: What we're really up against in saving our planet's wildlife

Nat Geo: What we're really up against in saving our planet's wildlife | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Thousands of elephants die each year so that their tusks can be carved into religious objects. Can the slaughter be stopped?

 

IN JANUARY 2012 A HUNDRED RAIDERS ON HORSEBACK CHARGED OUT OF CHAD INTO CAMEROON’S BOUBA NDJIDAH NATIONAL PARK, SLAUGHTERING HUNDREDS OF ELEPHANTS—entire families—in one of the worst concentrated killings since a global ivory trade ban was adopted in 1989....

 

THE PHILIPPINES CONNECTION
In an overfilled church Monsignor Cristobal Garcia, one of the best known ivory collectors in the Philippines, leads an unusual rite honoring the nation’s most important religious icon, the Santo Niño de Cebu (Holy Child of Cebu). The ceremony, which he conducts annually on Cebu...

 

THE CATHOLIC-MUSLIM UNDERGROUND
“Ivory, ivory, ivory,” says the saleswoman at the Savelli Gallery on St. Peter’s Square in Vatican City. “You didn’t expect so much. I can see it in your face.” The Vatican has recently demonstrated a commitment to confronting transnational criminal problems, signing agreements on drug trafficking, terrorism, and organized crime....

 

HOW TO SMUGGLE IVORY
I had no illusions of linking Monsignor Garcia to any illegal activity, but when I told him I wanted an ivory Santo Niño, the man surprised me. “You will have to smuggle it to get it into the U.S.”

“How?”

“Wrap it in old, stinky underwear and pour ketchup on it,” he said. “So it looks shitty with blood. This is how it is done.”....

 

THE ELEPHANT MONK
The ivory carvers in Phayuha Khiri and Surin are the most famous in Thailand and the targets of most investigations there into the illegal ivory trade. Phayuha Khiri is so dedicated to ivory that in the town center, where one might expect to see a fountain, there’s a circle of four great white tusks.....

 

CHINA’S IVORY FACTORIES
Inside the Beijing Ivory Carving Factory it smells and sounds like what it essentially is: a vast dentist’s office. The whir of electric drills on tusks fills the air. Ivory dust lies heavy on windowpanes and doorframes and even coats my teeth as I make my way among men and women bent over images that repeat the religious and mythological motifs...

 

THE JAPAN EXPERIMENT
In 1989, after ten years during which at least one elephant died every ten minutes, President George H. W. Bush unilaterally banned ivory imports, Kenya burned its 13 tons of ivory stocks, and CITES announced the global ivory ban, which began in 1990. Not all countries agreed to the ban....

 

DEVILS LURK IN DETAILS
Meng Xianlin is executive director general of China’s CITES management authority, making him China’s top wildlife-trade official. He attended the 2008 ivory auctions in southern Africa...

 

In March CITES will meet again to discuss the future of the African elephant.

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Some think wildlife trade bans may be worsening trafficking?

Some think wildlife trade bans may be worsening trafficking? | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
While founded with good intentions, wildlife trade bans may in some cases be worsening the plight of some endangered species, argues a commentary published in the journal Tropical Conservation Science.

 

Looking at three animals listed under the CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) — tigers, elephants and rhinos — Kirsten Conrad of AsiaCat argues that a moratorium on legal trade has exacerbated illegal trafficking by boosting prices and moving all commerce to the black market. She says the situation is worsened by poor law enforcement, ambiguous property rights, and demand rooted in "strong traditional affiliation".


Conrad argues that conservationists should carefully evaluate a radical option: legalizing commercial trade in some species.
"Given the abject failure of the trade ban to stem the decline of wild populations in the case of tigers, rhinos and elephants, legal trade needs to be given due consideration," Conrad writes. "Put another way, the solution to controlling the illegal market may be to outcompete it."


Conrad admits her proposal faces strong opposition from the conservation community.


"The specter of slaughtering tigers, shaving off rhino horn and selling off elephants is sure to raise a heated debate. Yet data on the continuing decline of wild populations and persistence of poaching should not be denied."

 

WildlifeMargrit:

This argument doesn't make sense! Why would anyone imagine that crime bosses who make their millions trafficking would ever back off if trade was legalized? Illegal trading is not like legal trading, it operates by totally different rules, and the pro trade folks don't ever seem to address that very crucial point.  

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How N.Y. can stop elephant slaughter 

How N.Y. can stop elephant slaughter  | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Robinson: This month has seen troubling headlines: A rising demand for elephant ivory in Asia and the introduction of global criminal networks into the illegal wildlife trade in Africa are pushing wild elephants ever closer to extinction.
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Sussex police issues warning to poachers

Sussex police issues warning to poachers | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

Sussex police have issued a warning to pheasant poachers - a day after a raid saw 70 of the birds stolen from a farm in Andover, Kent.

 

The Sussex Police statement reads: "The cosy, traditional image of a rural poacher taking a pheasant for the pot is far removed from the shady world of modern poaching, a lucrative criminal business. An increasing number of poaching-related crimes are now being put before the courts.

 

"Game dealers, restaurateurs, hotels and public houses are being advised to check that they are not buying illegally killed game. They can do this by not purchasing meat from people who they don't know, reporting immediately suspicious gatherings in car parks around vans or 4x4s.

 

"Commercial poaching is a serious problem on various levels. There is a real risk to public health as meat is introduced illegally into the system and in the case of deer poaching, the animals are shot at night using high-powered weapons with an obvious risk to public safety.

 

"There is also concern for deer not being killed in a clinical and professional manner as many are shot with weapons not suitable for the size of the animal."

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India: Wildlife activists accuse director of trafficking cover-up

Wildlife activists have accused the director of Corbett National Park of trying to cover up facts related to suspected tiger poaching there. Based on information procured under the Right to Information Act, the People for Animals, Uttarakhand has written a letter to the Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (PCCF), seeking the suspension of the director and an independent inquiry into the anomaliesF.

 

On May 24, the Corbett staff had discovered meat which was suspected of being tiger meat in the Bijrani range along with traps, tents, ration and other articles used by poachers. However, the Corbett authorities filed the report of the discovery of only one trap and the recovery of meat and other articles was not recorded.

 

On June 5, the officials arrested eight poachers and filed another report recording the seizure of traps and other articles....

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VIDEO: UNODC on Organized Crime: "Let's put them out of business!"

VIDEO: UNODC on Organized Crime: "Let's put them out of business!" | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
UNODC promotes health, justice and security, and is a global leader in the fight against illicit drugs and international crime.
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SMART: A SPATIAL MONITORING AND REPORTING TOOL

SMART: A SPATIAL MONITORING AND REPORTING TOOL | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

VIDEO: CONSERVATION PROBLEM
Wild tigers are in a critical state with less than 3,500 individuals remaining, of which only around 1,000 are thought to be breeding females. Breeding populations are scattered across a number of small areas and are at risk of further decline due to unsustainable hunting of the prey base and direct poaching to satisfy an illegal market for skins, bones and other body parts.

 

Current conservation strategy must adapt fast to change the status quo and improve enforcement effectiveness in protecting and recovering these breeding populations. Monitoring tools, supported by robust capacity-building initiatives, and designed to help law enforcement agencies empower their staff, boost motivation, increase efficiency, improve effectiveness and promote transparency are a central part of this strategy.

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Wildlife-Trafficking Bust Highlights: More than 8,700 animals seized

Wildlife-Trafficking Bust Highlights: More than 8,700 animals seized | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Wildlife-Trafficking Bust Highlights Problems in Caged Bird Trade by Abby McBride Environmental crime officials cracked down on wildlife trafficking between Latin America and Europe this summer,...

 

Environmental crime officials cracked down on wildlife trafficking between Latin America and Europe this summer, seizing more than 8,700 contraband animals in an Interpol bust dubbed Operation Cage. Authorities arrested nearly 4,000 people during raids on coastal ports, airports, post offices, markets, pet stores, and taxidermists in 32 countries. The sting focused on South and Central American birds, but it also uncovered illegally traded mammals, reptiles, fish, and insects—along with guns, ammunition, trapping equipment, and animal products such as elephant ivory....

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Hundreds of antlers seized in big-game trafficking bust southeast of Edmonton

Hundreds of antlers seized in big-game trafficking bust southeast of Edmonton | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
An east-central Alberta man and his business are facing charges after a four-month undercover investigation into illegal big-game trafficking led to the discovery of 500 sets of deer antlers and other antlers from moose, elk and caribou.
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Taking aim: Game Commission now has the tools to fight back against poachers

Taking aim: Game Commission now has the tools to fight back against poachers | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

Two years after a new, stiffer poaching law took effect, it is showing an impact as a deterrent and as a better way of punishing people who needlessly kill our state’s wild animals.


The latest case in point is the arrest of individuals from Cumberland County with illegally selling bear gallbladders, bear paws and a porcupine. The poached animal parts are in demand because they can sell for thousands of dollars in some countries.

 

Before the law was put into place, those charged in the case would have faced a summary offense, much like a traffic ticket, and a $500 fine for each of the gallbladders...

 

But because of the new law, they face jail time and fines of $3,000 for each gallbladder....

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Africa’s religious leaders hope to save wildlife from an escalating poaching crisis

Africa’s religious leaders hope to save wildlife from an escalating poaching crisis | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
NAIROBI, Kenya — Standing before a pile of charred elephant ivory as dusk covered the surrounding savannah, Christian, Muslim and Hindu religious leaders grasped hands and prayed. Let religion, they asked, help “God’s creatures” to survive.
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Berg & Bush mountain bike race supports World Rhino Day

The FedGroup Berg & Bush mountain bike race through KwaZulu-Natal is joining forces with Spioenkop Game Reserve to protect its 28 white rhino in celebration of World Rhino Day on Saturday.
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Tacoma man pleads not guilty to selling illegal wild animal meat

A 45-year-old Tacoma man has pleaded not guilty to charges that he illegally sold wild animal meat to undercover federal agents.
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After 60 years African big cat Cheetah to be reintroduced in India

Cheetah, fastest land animal that extinct from India, might be visible soon in the country again....

 

The, Cheetah is the only carnivore that was extinct in independent India. It's been almost 60 years since its extinction was reported.

 

WII and WTI took up challenges for reintroduction of Cheetah in the country in March 2011. In a comprehensive study that will end in March 2013; both parties jointly surveyed several landscapes for its reintroduction....

 

Cheetah reintroduction also suffered opposition as National Board for Wildlife (NBWL) didn't approved the project claiming that the specie is exotic and might face environmental impacts post reintroduction.

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Raids target alleged wildlife poachers and traffickers

Raids target alleged wildlife poachers and traffickers | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
A series of police operations across the state Tuesday targeted persons and businesses allegedly involved in poaching and selling wild animal parts.
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Law Enforcement from Asia, Africa, US gather for training to stop Wildlife Trafficking

Law Enforcement from Asia, Africa, US gather for training to stop Wildlife Trafficking | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

FREELAND Foundation for a World Free of Wildlife Trafficking and Human Slavery...

 

Bangkok, THAILAND (September 17, 2012) Over 30 law enforcement officers from Asia, Africa and the United States are gathering this week in Bangkok to conduct joint training and operational planning aimed at dismantling criminal syndicates responsible for the ongoing slaughter of elephants, rhinos, tigers and other endangered species. The five day confidential session, held at the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA), introduces new information and technology that will facilitate cross-border investigations into poaching gangs, traffickers, and black market dealers operating in Africa, Southeast Asia, China, and the United States.

 

The illegal trade in elephant ivory, rhino horn, tiger bones, pangolins, and other endangered species has become so profitable that it has attracted the attention of organized crime groups, some of which are networking across the three continents. Asian governments have established their own national and regional wildlife enforcement networks (WENs) and have recently started collaborating with African governments and the United States. In June, China hosted the ASEAN Wildlife Enforcement Network (ASEAN-WEN), the U.S. and two African governments in the “Special Investigation Group” (“SIG”) on wildlife crime in Nanning. This week’s “SIG” builds on progress made at the June gathering.

 

Participants will include investigators from Cameroon, China, Democratic Republic of Congo, Gabon, Indonesia, Kenya, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Thailand, Vietnam, South Africa, United States, Africa’s “Lusaka Agreement Task Force,” and the ASEAN-Wildlife Enforcement Network.

 

The Special Investigation Group training event is organized by FREELAND Foundation and is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, with technical assistance from the U.S. Agency for International Development through its "Asia’s Regional Response to Endangered Species Trafficking" (ARREST) Program.

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He brought up tigers in a reserve forest infested with poachers and tiger-haters | Heroism |

Bringing back the roar to Panna Tiger Reserve, which had no wild cat prowling in 2009, was a task cut out for R S Murthy.
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End Illegal Internet Wildlife Trafficking - Petition

End Illegal Internet Wildlife Trafficking - Petition | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

The illegal buying and selling of wildlife products such as elephant ivory and rhinocerous horn has recently exploded on the internet, putting endangered species even more at risk.

 

Please follow the link for details and to sign

http://forcechange.com/32995/end-illegal-internet-wildlife-trafficking/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=end-illegal-internet-wildlife-trafficking 

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