Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it?
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Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it?
Following the Animal Poaching Trail in Africa and the World
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UK: New move to snare poachers looking for 'easy pickings'

Earlier this year, he warned that a £5 million black market for venison was resulting in a poaching renaissance, with criminals targeting the West Country's wildlife, including the iconic red deer of Exmoor.

 

Mr Hunter said tackling poaching, which increases across England and Wales during late autumn following the harvest and as the hours of darkness lengthen, is one of the UK's wildlife crime priorities.

 

He said: "Poaching is a criminal activity – all poachers are trespassers and analysis by the NWCU over the past two years shows that, given an opportunity, poachers have diversified into thefts, burglaries, assaults and other rural crimes.

 

Many police forces are developing rural crime strategies where the tackling of all wildlife crime, and particularly poaching, is a priority. Project Trespass will help in the effort to co-ordinate intelligence and responses to reports of crime." Almost half of all wildlife crime from across the UK reported to the NWCU relates to "poaching intelligence", including the targeting of deer, fish and game.... 



Read more: http://www.thisissomerset.co.uk/New-snare-poachers-looking-easy-pickings/story-19867687-detail/story.html#ixzz2gUWmQv1F ;

Wildlife Margrit's insight:

What a novel thought! Maybe Africa could learn something from the Brits.

 

"Poaching is a criminal activity....all poachers are trespassers" and therefore should and can be prosecuted.

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Are adorable animal videos fueling the illegal wildlife trade?

Are adorable animal videos fueling the illegal wildlife trade? | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

YouTube sensations like the ticklish loris may be deadly cute in more ways than one...

 

5 REASONS YOU DON’T WANT A LORIS

They stink. Like, really bad. Maybe it has to do with the skin patches on their elbows that produce poison rumored to smell like dirty socks. Or the many other glands they use for signaling and communication. Or the way they mark territory with urine—by washing their hands and feet in it. So yeah, all of that.

 

They bite. Aside from covering themselves in the elbow juice to thwart parasites, the loris can mix this secretion with its saliva and inject it into you via tiny, curved incisors. Oh, and they also have some nasty fangs. (Though it’s likely your pet loris will have had its teeth cut off or dug out. So you’ll feel guilty every time you look at your pet’s face…and you should.)

 

They’re picky eaters. Lorises are mostly carnivores but have complex diets, so you can’t just give them a bowl of cat food and call it a day. To keep them healthy, you’ll need to keep live crickets, locusts, and mealworms on hand, not to mention gum and nectar. “Ah, I’ll just feed mine fruit,” you might think. No. Too much fruit gives lorises diabetes.

 

They’re nocturnal. Nocturnal pets are never fun. Never. To “play” with it, you’ll either have to stay up all night or wreck your pet’s circadian rhythm, which will likely cause it (and you) stress.

 

They’re wild animals. Neither adorable eyes, nor grippy hands, nor fluffy fluff are ever enough reason to rip a loris out of its home for your own amusement. They’re wild animals. And wild animals deserve to be free.

 

Wildlife Margrit's insight:
Although cute.... don't buy wild animals... they are meant to be wild. 5 REASONS YOU DON’T WANT A LORIS 

They stink. Like, really bad. Maybe it has to do with the skin patches on their elbows that produce poison rumored to smell like dirty socks. Or the many other glands they use for signaling and communication. Or the way they mark territory with urine—by washing their hands and feet in it. So yeah, all of that.

 

They bite. Aside from covering themselves in the elbow juice to thwart parasites, the loris can mix this secretion with its saliva and inject it into you via tiny, curved incisors. Oh, and they also have some nasty fangs.

(Though it’s likely your pet loris will have had its teeth cut off or dug out. So you’ll feel guilty every time you look at your pet’s face…and you should.)

 

They’re picky eaters. Lorises are mostly carnivores but have complex diets, so you can’t just give them a bowl of cat food and call it a day. To keep them healthy, you’ll need to keep live crickets, locusts, and mealworms on hand, not to mention gum and nectar. “Ah, I’ll just feed mine fruit,” you might think. No. Too much fruit gives lorises diabetes.

 

They’re nocturnal. Nocturnal pets are never fun. Never. To “play” with it, you’ll either have to stay up all night or wreck your pet’s circadian rhythm, which will likely cause it (and you) stress.

 

They’re wild animals. Neither adorable eyes, nor grippy hands, nor fluffy fluff are ever enough reason to rip a loris out of its home for your own amusement. They’re wild animals. And wild animals deserve to be free.

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Zimbabwe: Poachers Syndicate Operated for Five Years

The poaching syndicate that has been killing elephants by cyanide poisoning in the Hwange National Park has been operating for the past five years.

 

This was revealed by two members of the alleged syndicate when they appeared before Bulawayo magistrate Ms Gladmore Mushove on Thursday...

Wildlife Margrit's insight:

There's an old saying... you give them an inch and they take a mile.

Well, it seems like this holds true for wildlife trafficking. We didn't just suddenly arrive where we are today with so many elephant, rhino and other wildlife being killed and illegally traded.

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Outmanned, outgunned, outwitted - can the world win against the wildlife traffickers?

Outmanned, outgunned, outwitted - can the world win against the wildlife traffickers? | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
The President of Gabon has called for the establishment of a United Nations Special Envoy on wildlife crime and a UN General Assembly resolution at a side meeting in New York yesterday.  The Gabon hosted the meeting together with Germany and participants...
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100 Tanzanian Youth to Get Ranger Training As Part of Anti-Poaching Efforts

Tanzania National Parks (TANAPA) is providing a three-month military training for 100 youth as part of the country's efforts to fight poaching, Tanzania's Daily News reported Tuesday (September 24th).

 

Those selected to participate in the training have successfully passed military training tests and will begin the next phase of their preparation October 1st, TANAPA said. They will be considered for employment with the service after completion of training...

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Harsher anti-poaching measures touted

Harsher anti-poaching measures touted | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

Tanzania has been advised to make amendments to the Wildllife Conservation Act of 2009 in order to provide hard-hitting pernalties for poacers and traders of elephant tusks....

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Wildlife crime ranks among trafficking in drugs, arms and humans

Wildlife crime ranks among trafficking in drugs, arms and humans | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

Yury Fedotov and John E Scanlon: An economic crime perpetrated by criminal syndicates in the most remote regions, exploiting local people and lax laws...

 

Just this week, in Zimbabwe's largest game park, more than 80 elephants were killed for their ivory by poachers who poisoned a waterhole with cyanide. Across Zimbabwe's border, in South Africa, a record 688 rhinos were killed in 2013.

 

In 2011 alone, 25,000 wild elephants were illegally killed in Africa, primarily for their ivory. Over the past few years, poachers killed the last wild rhinos in Mozambique and Vietnam. The world's population of tigers has dwindled to around 3,000 animals in the wild. These are some of our most emblematic species, but wildlife crime is also robbing the natural heritage of peoples and states.

 

Wildlife crime now ranks among trafficking in drugs, arms and human beings in terms of profits. It is an economic crime often perpetrated by criminal syndicates operating in the most remote regions of our globalised world, exploiting local people and lax laws or enforcement for personal gain....

 

 

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3 Zimbabwe poachers get 16 years in prison for poisoning 87 elephants

Harare: A Zimbabwean court Wednesday sentenced three poachers up to 16 years in prison for killing 87 elephants using toxic cyanide in one of Africa's prime elephant sanctuaries, media reported.

 

The trio was convicted for illegal possession of ivory and contravening a law that prohibits the possession and discharge of hazardous substances, chemicals, materials or oil into the environment, Xinhua reported citing an online report by the Herald.

 

According to police probe, a syndicate of poachers dosed cyanide in water holes in the sprawling Hwange National Park last month and killed at least 87 elephants drinking water from the holes and indeterminate number of other animals on the food chain.

 

Initial reports said nine suspects were arrested, but the Herald Wednesday said only eight would appear in court. The other five suspects would stand trial next month.

 

The first three convicts were also ordered by Hwange provincial magistrate to each hand in $200,000-600,000 in fines by the end of the year.

 

Environment, Water and Climate Minister Saviour Kasukuwere, who earlier pledged a war against poaching, said on his twitter account that he welcomed "the bold stance by the Judiciary" and urged the public to preserve the country's wildlife.

 

Hwange is considered one of the three major wildlife sanctuaries in Africa, after Tanzania's Serengeti and South Africa's Kruger. Hwange is particularly known for its large number of elephants at 45,000, or 40 percent of the elephant population in Zimbabwe.

 

Poaching has been on the rise in recent years as the state national parks management agency is seriously under-funded. In Hwange alone, only 50 rangers patrol the 14,650-sq-km park, about one tenth of the number of rangers needed.

Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Quick decisive action! Thank you.

First three of the poachers who poisoned a waterhole to steal elephant ivory get 16 years in prison.

The havoc their deed created on the ecosystem is horrific as other animals (large and small), birds and living organisms died as well. So no matter how long the they were to serve, it wouldn't be enough. 

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Monkey paws at Durban's muthi market

Monkey paws at Durban's muthi market | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

Need a monkey paw? I know where to go.


I wanted to see if Durban’s muthi (medicine) market was brimming with as many monkey paws, snake skins and owl carcasses as I had heard.

 

Annually the South African traditional muthi trade is worth around R 2.9 billion, dispenses around 128 million courses of medication and employs more than 133 000 people.

 

The demand for the remedies is a menace to many threatened plant and animal species but putting an end to it would be devastating for economic and cultural reasons....

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Prince William Forms New Conservation Group, United for Wildlife

Prince William Forms New Conservation Group, United for Wildlife | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

LONDON, UK, September 18, 2013 (ENS) – At an awards ceremony honoring wildlife conservationists, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, announced that his foundation will collaborate with seven of the world’s most influential conservation organizations in a new partnership to combat illegal wildlife trafficking.

 

The seven participating groups are: Conservation International, Fauna & Flora International, International Union for Conservation of Nature, The Nature Conservancy, Wildlife Conservation Society, WWF UK and the Zoological Society of London....

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Zimbabwe: Call for Stiffer Penalties Against Poachers

Zimbabwe: Call for Stiffer Penalties Against Poachers | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

Environment, Water and Climate Minister Saviour Kasukuwere has called on Government to impose stiffer penalties to deter poachers from killing wild animals in national parks. This comes after elephants were last month poisoned by poachers at the Hwange National Park and Tsholotsho killing 58 in the process....

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Greer Noble's curator insight, September 18, 2013 9:52 AM

This is the best news that's come out of Zimbabwe for years!!!!

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Armed poachers cost East Africa millions

Rich armed poachers are costing East Africa millions of dollars in illegal ivory trade. The illegal trade is mostly fuelled by demand in Asia and the Middle East, where elephant tusks and rhinoceros horns are used in traditional medicine and to make ornaments.

 

Uganda and her sister states in the East African region account for 68% of the illegal ivory trade in the world, according to a 2012 report released at the Convention on International Trade in Endangered species (CITES) at Bangkok, Thailand....

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Greer Noble's curator insight, September 18, 2013 10:04 AM

Save your world.. every effort counts.. here's how and it won't cost you a cent.. http://greernoble.com/non-fiction---invitation.html

 

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Otago poaching kingpin jailed four years

The kingpin of an Otago paua poaching ring has been sentenced to four years behind bars for illegally catching the delicacy and selling it on the black market

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Ryan Karl Tapsell, 40, from Dunedin, was sentenced in Dunedin District Court on Friday to four year's jail on 15 charges acquiring false documents and taking and selling paua without a permit.

 

Tapsell was the main offender in an Otago paua poaching operation that was disbanded in "Operation Apollo", the Ministry for Primary Industries says...

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Will the UK commit to funding the National Wildlife Crime Unit?

Will the UK commit to funding the National Wildlife Crime Unit? | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
A side event was held at the General Meeting of the United Nations yesterday. It was held jointly by the Gabon and Germany to highlight wildlife crime and trade.
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Zimbabwe: Poacher Shoots Poacher

A suspected poacher is battling for life at Parirenyatwa Hospital after being shot by a colleague who reportedly mistook him for a wild animal.

 

To access medical attention, the poachers misrepresented to the police that they had been attacked by armed robbers who intended to steal their vehicle, a claim which they, however, failed to sustain....

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Dev Maharaj's comment, September 30, 2013 12:22 AM
Attention all poachers, please follow this example and shoot all other poachers..
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Poachers stealing dinosaur fossils

Poachers stealing dinosaur fossils | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

IT took millions of years for prehistoric fossils in Manitoba to be unearthed by Joseph Hatcher -- only to see some of them vanish into thin air.

 

"There's nothing as heartbreaking as you've spent a month or two months excavating a grand skeleton -- a big mosasaur -- only to show up the next day and find it's been poached or destroyed," said Hatcher, the curator of the Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre in Morden. "Right here in Manitoba.

 

"As researchers we're wondering what happened to our site? What happened to our skeleton?" ...

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United States calls for global ivory destruction on 8th October

United States calls for global ivory destruction on 8th October | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
The United States has sent a notification to the Parties of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) inviting the global community to join them in destroying their stocks of ivory.
Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Whose in?

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Hotel industry takes a stand against poaching

NAIROBI, Kenya - Delegates at the Africa Hotel Investment Forum (AHIF) in Nairobi today declared poaching to be the greatest threat to Africa's tourism industry and branded poachers as Africa's Public Enemy No.1....

Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Now it's starting to hit their pocket book....

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Wildlife group says poaching funds Somalia's Shebab

Somalia's Shebab militia, which carried out a bloody attack on Nairobi's Westgate mall, is in part funded by the poaching trade, wildlife activists said Thursday.
Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Oh my!

We're seeing it happen before our very eyes.... once corruption, greed, and exploitation set in all hell breaks loose!

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Global Community Takes Bold Steps to Fight Elephant Poaching

Global Community Takes Bold Steps to Fight Elephant Poaching | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

Halting the ivory trade could do more than protect elephants; it could help enhance national and global security....

 

We may be at a tipping point for Africa’s elephants. The population has plunged to only a quarter of what it was in 1980. Last year alone, an estimated more than 35,000 elephants were killed by poachers....

 

http://blog.conservation.org/2013/09/global-community-takes-bold-steps-to-fight-elephant-poaching/#sthash.TQDjtvvx.dpuf ;

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Why Secret Wildlife Cameras Might Be a Poacher’s Worst Nightmare

Why Secret Wildlife Cameras Might Be a Poacher’s Worst Nightmare | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

It seemed at first like a familiar story. In 2011 at Orang National Park in Assam, India, poachers killed one of the park’s 70 rhinos, hacked off its precious horn, and made their escape. But a few days later, park rangers were flipping through the latest batch of images from a nearby camera trap set to monitor wildlife.

 

To their surprise, the camera had caught a perfect image of three poachers entering the park before the killing, armed with .303 rifles. After “wanted” posters appeared in nearby villages, two of the poachers soon surrendered and the third fled the area. There was only one problem: The rhino was already dead.

 

Could camera traps actually stop poachers before they kill? Since they first became widely available a decade or so ago, camera traps have revolutionized conservation biology. Human researchers tended to work by day, says Tim O’Brien, a camera trap specialist in Kenya for the Wildlife Conservation Society. But “half the species out there are nocturnal, and the other half are doing everything they can to avoid humans.” By being on the scene around the clock and without human disturbance, other than occasional visits to change batteries and download photos, camera traps have recently solved both problems, often with spectacular results:..

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Haley van Zante's curator insight, September 30, 2013 12:05 PM

Some people wonder why we can't just use your cell phones instead of cameras. The problem with that is that curtain places do not have signal for cell phones, and so it is not possible. Cameras also have better lenses and cell phone cameras sometimes don't show things clear enough when it's far away. 

Brent Van Der Wiel's comment, October 3, 2013 8:06 PM
Having hidden trail or game cameras that are motion activated can track a lot of activity. They are used often to count herd numbers, as well as investigate into poaching. If poachers are seen when the game cameras are reviewed, it isn't to difficult to then track them down and stop them from killing another animal before it happens again.
Wildlife Margrit's comment, October 7, 2013 11:00 AM
Thanks for that Brent
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South African businessman behind elephant poisonings

South African businessman behind elephant poisonings | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

Zimbabwean police are bringing their investigations into the deaths of at least 64 elephants by cyanide poisoning in the Hwange National Park to an end....

 

Police revealed that the poachers would mix up a combination of cyanide, salt and water. This would then be poured onto salt licks at watering holes known to be frequented by elephants. At other watering holes the poachers would dig holes and place containers containing the deadly mixture into the holes.

 

The technique was so effective at killing elephants that when the poachers took police to the sites that had been contaminated there were bodies of elephants with small tusks still intact because it wasn’t worth the effort to take the tusks, The poachers were being paid as little as $700 for 9 tusks....

Wildlife Margrit's insight:

Let's hope they really make an example of these guys!

The recent poisoning in Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe is being called "an ecological disaster" as not only 64 elephants died, but lions, buffalo, jackal and who knows what other animals and birds drinking the poisoned water.

 

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Haley van Zante's curator insight, September 27, 2013 10:47 AM

Zimbabwean police have been investigating into the deaths of at least 64 elephants. The elephants were posioned by cyanide. The person behind all of this is a South African businessman, and has been doing this since 2009. My question is, how could someone live everyday knowing that they have killed an innocent animal? 

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Wildlife Poachers shamed in web campaign

Wildlife Poachers shamed in web campaign | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Campaigners in Kenya opened a new front in the war on poaching yesterday, with a website dedicated to naming and shaming the culprits
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Ireland: Night time kayak patrols aim to catch poachers

Ireland: Night time kayak patrols aim to catch poachers | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

Use of covert cameras in known poaching hotspots proving very successful.

 

However, according to Minister of State for Natural Resources Fergus O’Dowd, this type of detection equipment is now being used to protect wild fish stocks from poaching....

 

He said night time kayak patrols were now being conducted with thermal imaging equipment along some of the country’s largest river systems, “and they have significantly aided in the detection of riverine nets”.

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Holy Help: Buddhist Monks Shielding Snow Leopards From Poachers

Holy Help: Buddhist Monks Shielding Snow Leopards From Poachers | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
On the Tibetan plateau, the endangered big cats are being protected by hundreds of monasteries.
Wildlife Margrit's insight:

What's behind this? It appears a very basic Buddist reverence for all life.

How simple is that? Maybe we all could learn something here?

 

Research results:

47% claimed they did not kill wildlife because the government prohibited it” 42% said they did not kill wildlife because it was a sin in Buddhism.”

More pragmatically,

28% said they did not kill wildlife because they did not have guns.

However, supposedly many locals swear an oath to their Rinpoche every year not to kill wildlife.

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