Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it?
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Eco Rock Stars: People Doing Good for Wildlife

Eco Rock Stars: People Doing Good for Wildlife | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

Dr. Amy Dickman. Tanzania.
Kaplan Senior Research Fellow. Ruaha Carnivore Project
WildCRU. Oxford University.
www.ruahacarnivoreproject.com

I have been passionate about, and enthralled by, big cats for as long as I can remember. Their power, beauty, and sheer wildness is completely awe-inspiring. I find it terrifying that species as iconic as lions and tigers are in such danger and that it falls upon us, right now, to decide whether or not they survive. Tanzania’s Ruaha landscape holds some of the most important big cat populations left in the world, and our team at the Ruaha Carnivore Project is working in partnership with local communities to encourage simultaneous wildlife conservation and human development in this critically important area.

Photo Credit: Pat Erickson

Dr. Gladys Kalema-Zikusoka. Uganda.
Founder + CEO. Conservation Through Public Health.
www.ctph.org

My wildlife veterinary career started with setting up the Uganda Wildlife Authority veterinary department, where I led a team that investigated a fatal scabies skin disease outbreak in the critically endangered mountain gorillas. The disease was traced to Bwindi Impenetrable National Park communities who only have limited access to basic health services. This made me realize that you cannot protect gorillas without improving the health and livelihoods of the people whom they share their fragile habitat with. This led to the establishment of Conservation Through Public Health, a grassroots non-profit that works with people and wildlife in and around Africa’s protected areas.

Emmanuel de Merode. Democratic Republic of Congo.
Chief Warden. Virunga National Park.
www.virungacrisis.org

I decided to commit my life to the protection of African wildlife when, as an 11 year old child, I saw an elephant that had been killed by poachers. From then, my school education became an unfortunate obstacle to the life of choice which took me to the forests and savannas of Congo. Over twenty years of working for Congo’s national parks, I witnessed the pains, struggles, and triumphs of their wildlife rangers, who through their self-sacrifice, achieved the greatest of results in modern conservation history, the survival of the Mountain Gorillas through the Congo’s Civil War.

Lindsey Sterling Krank. Colorado.
Director. Prairie Dog Coalition. The Humane Society of the US.
www.prairiedogcoalition.org

Ever since I was driving in the family station wagon through national parks and wildlife areas, I have been drawn to the outdoors. I would stare out the window and think, “I want to get out there, right in the middle of all that beauty.” I’m drawn to working to protect these places and animals that call them home. Working with the Prairie Dog Coalition has given me the opportunity to protect a keystone species. Not only do we conserve this animal but the many species who depend on them, including black-footed ferrets, swift foxes, burrowing owls, and golden eagles.

Madelaine Westwood. United Kingdom.
Founder. Great Apes Film Initiative. (GAFI)
www.gafi4apes.org

As a longtime wildlife filmmaker, I took on the massive decline in endangered species. It seemed impossible to change, but I used my skills to create the Pedal Powered Cinema to screen conservation films where people live with the issues. They come, often a thousand at a time, to see the screenings. GAFI works in 15 countries across Africa and SE Asia and has screened films to 300 million people. As a result, children plant trees and communities protect forests. I learned one individual can create change, and if everyone used their skills to help, we will keep our extraordinary world.

Carmina Gutiérrez + Miguel Gómez. Sonora. Mexico.
Jaguar Guardians. Northern Jaguar Project + Naturalia
www.northernjaguarproject.org

Revered for its strength, beauty, and grace, the jaguar is an emblem of species conservation in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Much of the work to protect and provide refuge for this northernmost jaguar population lies with its guardians, Carmina Gutiérrez and Miguel Gómez. They mirror the strength and grace of the jaguars they protect. This engaging duo has taken the northern jaguar under their wing, working tirelessly to protect these endangered cats and ensure their safe haven. Both know where the jaguars roam and diligently follow their tracks throughout the remote, rugged landscape of the 50,000 acre Northern Jaguar Reserve. A deep passion for wilderness and wildlife carries Carmina and Miguel always forward.

Peter Lalampaa. Kenya.
Senior Manager. Grevy’s Zebra Trust.
www.grevyszebratrust.org

My passion is conservation of biodiversity because there is a link between pastoral livelihood and ecosystem health. I address habitat loss for wildlife and secure grass for livestock. We need to view things from a wide, bird’s-eye view. “It is not just me, but it is us.” Natural resources scarcity leads to inter-tribal clashes for grass and water for their livelihood, their cattle. I work on community education and awareness to address range land degradation and secure wildlife resources, as well as give a smile to the pastoral community through securing pasture for their livestock.

The Grevy’s Zebra Trust was established in January 2007 to address the urgent need to conserve Grevy’s zebra (Equus grevyi) in the community range lands of Kenya. It is an independent wildlife conservation Trust registered in Kenya.

Rebecca Klein. Botswana.
Founder + Managing Director. Cheetah Conservation Botswana.
www.cheetahbotswana.com

I wanted to work in wildlife conservation ever since I can remember. After graduation, I volunteered for a year at Mokolodi Nature Reserve, where I met two cheetah brothers whose mother had been killed by a farmer. I cared for them, and we developed a strong bond. I was surprised to learn cheetah were considered a pest amongst rural communities. One of Africa’s most elegant cats was being trapped, shot, run down, and killed. Here was my chance to make a difference! I founded Cheetah Conservation Botswana to use community outreach, education, and research to ensure the cheetah’s survival.

Rebecca and her team work to ensure survival of free ranging cheetah, ensuring the spirit of the Kalahari, its wildlife and culture, remains for future generations.

D. Simon Jackson. Canada.
Founder + Chairman. Spirit Bear Youth Coalition.
www.spiritbearyouth.org

Since the age of 13, I’ve dedicated my life to saving Canada’s highly endangered white Kermode, or spirit bear, a genetically unique subspecies of the black bear that numbers fewer than 400. In the process of creating the now six-million-strong Spirit Bear Youth Coalition, we helped shape what was North America’s largest land protection measure, helping protect two-thirds of this bear’s last intact habitat. Our positive, solutions-based campaign strives to complete our vision of sanctuary for the spirit bear by producing a Hollywood animated movie to raise funds to help the region’s economy and finalize the bear’s conservation. 

 

http://www.originmagazine.com/2012/09/22/eco-rock-stars-9-people/ ;

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Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it?
Following the Animal Poaching Trail in Africa and the World
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12 Nat Geo Stories That Exposed Wildlife Exploitation

12 Nat Geo Stories That Exposed Wildlife Exploitation | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Here’s a look back at some of our most powerful reports that revealed how wild animals (and trees) are being threatened.
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Spy arrests lift lid on Botswana’s silent trafficking threat

Spy arrests lift lid on Botswana’s silent trafficking threat | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Botswana has a global reputation for zero tolerance of poaching and wildlife crimes. In recent years, however, it has become vulnerable to insider wildlife crimes committed by rogue securit
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LionAid - Ten things you did not know about the bushmeat trade

LionAid - Ten things you did not know about the bushmeat trade | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Recent illegal wildlife trade summits, like those in Botswana and London, hardly address the bushmeat trade – their agendas were captured by NGOs promoting the need to tackle the illegal ivory trade and to a lesser extent the rhino horn trade. Yet the illegal bushmeat trade is by far the most significant threat to the survival of Africa’s wildlife – within and without protected areas.
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African Elephants Paying the Price for Ivory

African Elephants Paying the Price for Ivory | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
African elephants are paying the price for ivory and time is running out as poaching, wildlife trafficking continues to threaten this iconic species.
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Poached: why international conservation efforts are failing to protect wildlife

Poached: why international conservation efforts are failing to protect wildlife | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Photographer and wildlife guide Paul Goldstein condemns inadequate international efforts to protect tigers, rhinos and other wildlife, and calls for tougher measures
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Ivory poachers using drones and heavy artillery to hunt animals

Ivory poachers using drones and heavy artillery to hunt animals | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

The recent horrific attack on a white rhino in a Paris zoo is just one example of a new, extreme era of hunting
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Notorious Tanzanian ivory trafficker jailed for 12 years » Capital News

Notorious Tanzanian ivory trafficker jailed for 12 years » Capital News | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Capital Fm provides the latest Kenyan news & Breaking News,the best Mix Of Music, Business & Technology, Sports, Lifestyle & much more
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Botswana's Elephant Refugee Crisis - Conservation Action Trust

Botswana's Elephant Refugee Crisis - Conservation Action Trust | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Photo Credit: Elephant Without Borders Mention the word refugees, and the image that comes to mind is that of humans that have been forced to leave their countries due to war, persecution or natural disaster. Botswana, a landlocked country in Southern Africa, is facing a different kind of refugee crisis – one caused by theRead More
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Why Are Most of Tanzania's Elephants Disappearing?

Why Are Most of Tanzania's Elephants Disappearing? | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Tanzania's elephant population has plummeted by more than 60 percent during the past five years, the country's government announced this month.

Elephants in this East African country—a major, if not the world's biggest source of illegal ivory—were estimated to number only 43,330 at the end of 2014, down from 109,051 in 2009.

Tanzania's Minister of Natural Resources and Tourism, Lazaro Nyalandu, says the drastic decline might be because elephants had migrated into neighboring countries. The ministry, he said recently, is trying "to find out what happened to these elephants."
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8b NanoW's curator insight, February 9, 10:57 PM

The article is about the lack of elephants in Tanzania, even though some suspect that the elephants just moved out of the country but it still might be an issue that needs to be addressed. This article helps me understand Africa because animal population or animals in existence.

 

I think that these animals in Africa should be treated better and not be treated and killed for money or for their ivory. I feel that this is very sad because these animals are rare and are running out.

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Chinese Embassy Organizes Street Protests Against Ivory Trade in Tanzania

Over five hundred people, many of them Chinese, took to the streets of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, on Saturday to protest illegal ivory trade in the country.
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US funding new soldiers in wildlife trafficking war: giant rats

US funding new soldiers in wildlife trafficking war: giant rats | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Elite rat team to begin by spotting illegal shipments of pangolins, the world’s most trafficked animal, at ports in Tanzania
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Poachers kill 26 elephants in Chobe National Park

Poachers kill 26 elephants in Chobe National Park | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
A horrific scene as poachers in Chobe National Park kill 26 elephants for their ivory.
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About African Elephants Paying the Price for Ivory - Info, Images, Videos

About African Elephants Paying the Price for Ivory - Info, Images, Videos | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
African elephants are paying the price for ivory and time is running out as poaching, wildlife trafficking continues to threaten this iconic species.
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Utah technology aiding anti-poaching efforts in South Africa

Utah technology aiding anti-poaching efforts in South Africa | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
A Davis County company is using its technology in the fight against illegal poaching of threatened and endangered species. Ogden-based International Armoring Corp. has contracted to outfit four helico
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Good news for Africa’s elephants: China is losing its taste for ivory

Good news for Africa’s elephants: China is losing its taste for ivory | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
A new report shows the price of ivory in China is plummeting as the government closes down factories.
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The woman risking her life to save Africa's elephants

The woman risking her life to save Africa's elephants | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Georgina Kamanga is on a mission to show the world that Africans are passionate about protecting wildlife
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Man admits to 'biggest protected wildlife seizure' in Australia

A Darwin man pleads guilty to more than 370 charges of poaching protected wildlife including wedge-tailed eagles, brolgas and falcons.
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Woman fined $75K for importing jewelry made from endangered species

Woman fined $75K for importing jewelry made from endangered species | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Xiu Mei Cui had jewelry and carvings made from elephants, lion and white rhinoceros.
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Five rangers die in grim month for wildlife protectors

Five rangers die in grim month for wildlife protectors | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Rangers lost their lives in Kenya, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and India
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8B DanielO's curator insight, March 3, 12:22 AM
This article is about rhino poaching. Recently rhino poaching had dropped significantly by 10 percent. This may sound like a good news, but this actually means that over the decade, rhino’s total population had been dropping, making it harder for poacher to find rhino, resulting a 10% decrease. This problem happens though each year, resulting near extinction of rhinos in Africa. It is known to be true that anti poaching and rangers might have dropped rhino poaching rate, but it is still clear that rhino population had dropped significantly over the few years. This is all because of the illegal horn customers who risks to buy horn, or basically risking to go to jail. 

This article helps me understand Africa because recently there were a lot of news about animal poaching Africa. This article help me understand that Africa is still going through troubles when it comes to animal poaching. It also helps me realize that there are groups of people who are trying to stop animal poaching. This article relates to what we are studying about because we recently studied about problems in Africa and animal poaching was one of them. I hope animal poaching could really stop and I hope people will care about animals and our world.
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More Than Two Tons of Animal Parts Seized in China Poaching Raid

More Than Two Tons of Animal Parts Seized in China Poaching Raid | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it

Police in China's Sichuan province have seized more than two tons of animal parts and whole carcasses, in a large-scale wildlife poaching arrest in the city of Mianyang.

According to the Huaxi City Daily, the seizure is the culmination of a six-month investigation and was 2016's largest wildlife parts arrest.

In total, 193 animal carcasses or parts were seized, from a wide variety of animals. Included were 9 bear heads, 11 bear claws, 42 owl bodies, eagle bodies, 3 crocodile parts and a collection of pangolin scales.
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Garry Rogers's curator insight, January 27, 3:28 PM
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Wildlife Trafficking: The Sordid Connection | Daily Maverick

Wildlife Trafficking: The Sordid Connection | Daily Maverick | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
The shadowy collusion of South Africa with Mozambique, Laos and Vietnam is satiating Asia’s great thirst for illegally trafficked wildlife, writes ADAM CRUISE.
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Elephant poacher shot dead 

Elephant poacher shot dead  | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
“Are these people killing our animals to deliberately drive them to extinction?” he wanted to know. “We are not only protecting rhino and elephants, but all animals that are protected under law. We are here to protect all wildlife to save them from perishing, for future generations.”
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Four countries are acting as safe havens for African elephants

Four countries are acting as safe havens for African elephants | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
African elephants are crossing borders to escape lawlessness and fighting. They seem to be heading to Botswana, Gabon, Namibia and Uganda. These countries are bucking the trend of elephant declines elsewhere, due in part to their political stability, relatively sparse populations and low levels of government corruption.

With about 100 elephants slaughtered for ivory every day in Africa, they could disappear within decades across much of their range.
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Three suspected poachers gunned down in Aberdare National Park

Three suspected poachers gunned down in Aberdare National Park | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Three suspected poachers were gunned down at Aberdares National Park after a fierce exchange of fire with KWS rangers on Sunday night.  An AK-47 rifle, two rounds of ammunition, a spear, an axe and a weighing machine were recovered from the suspects. Paul Udoto, Kenya Wildlife Service communications manager,  said the agency has intensified patrols and intelligence information gathering within the Aberdare ecosystem.
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Why elephants are seeking refuge in Botswana

Why elephants are seeking refuge in Botswana | Wildlife Trafficking: Who Does it? Allows it? | Scoop.it
Elephants used to roam between borders of southern- African countries but threatened with poaching, the animals are now seeking refuge in Botswana which has strict conservation laws.
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