Anglo Saxons
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Why do we have surnames? - English Heritage Blog

Why do we have surnames? - English Heritage Blog | Anglo Saxons | Scoop.it
Have you ever wondered where your surname comes from? As Rowena Willard-Wright explains, surnames developed in England after the Norman Conquest in 1066
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A million Vikings still live among us

A million Vikings still live among us | Anglo Saxons | Scoop.it
Almost one million Britons alive today are of Viking descent, which means one in 33 men can claim to be direct descendants of the Vikings.
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Who Are the British? DNA Research Reveals the Truth

Who Are the British? DNA Research Reveals the Truth | Anglo Saxons | Scoop.it
Who are the British? DNA research reveals surprising facts about the origins of Britain's population. What does this tell us about the way we cling to mistaken assumptions about our own and other races' identity?
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AGE OF HEROES - 3: HIERARCHY - Elbowing the Opposition (Jutes, Angles and Saxons)

AGE OF HEROES - 3: HIERARCHY - Elbowing the Opposition (Jutes, Angles and Saxons) | Anglo Saxons | Scoop.it
After the Romans left in AD410 waves of Germanic invaders migrated to Britain, some knowing the land, who had served the Romans as foederati. The kingdoms of theJutes, Angles and Saxons grew...
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Alfred the Great - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Alfred the Great - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Alfred successfully defended his kingdom against the Viking attempt at conquest, and by the time of his death had become the dominant ruler in England. He is one of only two English monarchs to be given the epithet "the Great", the other being the Scandinavian Cnut the Great.

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Anglo-Saxon History « The Freelance History Writer

Anglo-Saxon History « The Freelance History Writer | Anglo Saxons | Scoop.it
Posts about Anglo-Saxon History written by Susan Abernethy
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Osburh, Mother of Anglo-Saxon King Alfred the Great

Osburh, Mother of Anglo-Saxon King Alfred the Great | Anglo Saxons | Scoop.it
What little we know about Alfred the Great’s mother comes to us from the biography of Alfred written by his great friend, Bishop Asser. Asser writes only a few lines about her and doesn’t tell us much. She doesn’t appear in any charters from the reign of her husband King Aethelwulf. The role of wives…
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Anglo Saxons

Anglo Saxons | Anglo Saxons | Scoop.it
Anglo Saxons
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Anglo-Saxons left language, but maybe not genes to modern Britons | Science News

Anglo-Saxons left language, but maybe not genes to modern Britons | Science News | Anglo Saxons | Scoop.it
Modern Britons may be more closely related to Britain’s indigenous people than they are to the Anglo-Saxons, a new genetic analysis finds.
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SLH.landscapes - Angeln - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Angeln

Angeln, also known as Anglia ( German: Angeln, Danish: Angel, Latin: Anglia), is a small peninsula (within the larger Jutland peninsula) in Southern Schleswig in the northern Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, protruding into the Bay of Kiel.

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Roman Empire 125 - Angles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Angles

The Angles (Latin Anglii ) were one of the main Germanic peoples who settled in Britain in the post-Roman period. They founded several of the kingdoms of Anglo-Saxon England, and their name is the root of the name England.

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Offa of Mercia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Offa of Mercia

Offa was King of Mercia, a kingdom of Anglo-Saxon England, from 757 until his death in July 796. The son of Thingfrith and a descendant of Eowa, Offa came to the throne after a period of civil war following the assassination of Æthelbald. Offa defeated the other claimant, Beornred.

Naomi Hodgetts's insight:

Mention of Offa ruling over Sussex in the late 780's.

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Tomsaete - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tomsaete

The Tomsaete or Tomsæte (dwellers of the Tame valley) were a tribe or clan in Anglo-Saxon England living in the valley of the River Tame in the West Midlands of England from around 500 and remaining around Tamworth throughout the existence of the Kingdom of Mercia.

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The Welsh may be the truest Britons according to new genetic research

The Welsh may be the truest Britons according to new genetic research | Anglo Saxons | Scoop.it
Scientists at Oxford University have found that modern Britain can be divided into 17 distinct genetic 'clans' (pictured) with the Welsh having the most DNA from the original settlers of the British Isles.
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Who Are the British? DNA Research Reveals the Truth

Who Are the British? DNA Research Reveals the Truth | Anglo Saxons | Scoop.it
Who are the British? DNA research reveals surprising facts about the origins of Britain's population. What does this tell us about the way we cling to mistaken assumptions about our own and other races' identity?
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HERITAGE - 1: Direct Line to our Distant Past. What made us English? Reading list for a Bygone Era

HERITAGE - 1: Direct Line to our Distant Past. What made us English? Reading list for a Bygone Era | Anglo Saxons | Scoop.it
From early English history, origins and language, a politically-oriented piece on the people, origins, language and what the kingdom has become that began with a few warbands from over the North Sea
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Britons still live in Anglo-Saxon tribal kingdoms, Oxford University finds

Britons still live in Anglo-Saxon tribal kingdoms, Oxford University finds | Anglo Saxons | Scoop.it
A new genetic map of Britain shows that there has been little movement between
areas of Britain which were former tribal kingoms in Anglo-Saxon England
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The Early Anglo-Saxons | The Sussex Archaeological Society

The Early Anglo-Saxons | The Sussex Archaeological Society | Anglo Saxons | Scoop.it
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Sussex last to convert to Christianity in the late 7th century.

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Collaborative Doctoral Award: Understanding the Anglo-Saxons: the English and Continental manuscript evidence (London, British Library)

Collaborative Doctoral Award: Understanding the Anglo-Saxons: the English and Continental manuscript evidence (London, British Library) | Anglo Saxons | Scoop.it
Collaborative Doctoral Award: Understanding the Anglo-Saxons: the English and Continental manuscript evidence London, British Library Deadline: 28 November 2014 The culture of Anglo-Saxon England b...
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Jutland Peninsula map - Jutland Peninsula - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jutland Peninsula

The Jutland Peninsula ( Danish: Den Jyske Halvø German: Jütische Halbinsel) or more historically the Cimbrian Peninsula ( Danish: Den Kimbriske Halvø German: Kimbrische Halbinsel) is a peninsula in Europe, divided between Denmark and Germany. The names are derived from the Jutes and the Cimbri.

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River Tame, West Midlands - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

River Tame, West Midlands - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The River Tame is the main river of the West Midlands, and the most important tributary of the River Trent. The Tame is about 95 km from the source at Oldbury to its confluence with the Trent near Alrewas, but the main river length of the entire catchment, i.e.

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Language Contact and Development Around the North Sea

Language Contact and Development Around the North Sea | Anglo Saxons | Scoop.it
This volume brings together eleven studies on the history of language and writing in the North Sea area, with focus on contacts and interchanges through time. Its range spans from the investigation of pre-Germanic place-names to present-day Shetland; the materials studied include glosses, legal and trade documents as well as place names and modern dialects. The volume is unique in its combination of linguistics and place-name studies with literacy studies, which allows for a very dynamic picture of the history of language contact and texts in the North Sea area. Different approaches come together to illuminate a major insight: the omnipresence of multilingualism as a context for language development and a formative characteristic of literacy. Among the contributors are experts on English, Nordic and German language history. The book will be of interest to a wide range of scholars and students working on the history of Northern European languages, literacy studies and language contact
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