Anesthesia Updates
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Rescooped by Anesthesia Education from Breast Cancer News
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Anesthesia Technique May Reduce Breast Cancer Recurrence and Death

Anesthesia Technique May Reduce Breast Cancer Recurrence and Death | Anesthesia Updates | Scoop.it

"Breast cancer patients who received the combination of a nerve block with general anesthesia for their breast cancer surgery had less cancer recurrence and were three times less likely to die than those who received only general anesthesia, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2013 annual meeting. Additionally, patients who received the nerve block needed less opioid pain relief from drugs such as fentanyl and oxycodone.

“Surgery has long been the most effective treatment for solid cancer tumors,” said Palle S. Carlsson, M.D., Ph.D., of the Department of Anaesthesiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. “However, it has been theorized that the long-term effect of anesthetic method, drugs used and the pain therapy applied after surgery can influence how the disease progresses – whether the cancer comes back or the patient dies.”

During cancer surgery, tumor cells released into the bloodstream can transfer from the original tumor area and implant in lymph nodes and other organs far from the primary tumor, according to Dr. Carlsson. The human immune system plays a major role in fighting these runaway cells; however, surgery and anesthesia weaken the immune system."


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, October 16, 2013 4:18 PM

According to the article "the study found that the death rate was significantly lower in the group who received the nerve block with general anesthesia. Ten percent of patients who received the nerve block and general anesthesia died compared to 32 percent of patients who received the placebo. Additionally, the rate of cancer recurrence was significantly less for the nerve block and general anesthesia group as compared to the placebo group: 13 percent had a recurrence while 37 percent of the placebo group’s cancer returned."

Tambre Leighn's curator insight, October 19, 2013 2:54 PM

Yet another example of how important it is for today's patient to get informed and ask questions.  Do your due diligence on headlines, articles and studies and then ask your medical team if you find something that could potentially be benefitial.  I once found a solution to my late husband's fatigue during chemotherapy in a People Magazine article about athletes using pharma solutions to get more O2 into their blood.

Rescooped by Anesthesia Education from Little Syringe Big Syringe
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Anesthesia Technique May Affect Survival After Breast Cancer Surgery.

Anesthesia Technique May Affect Survival After Breast Cancer Surgery. | Anesthesia Updates | Scoop.it
The anesthesia technique used during breast cancer surgery may affect cancer recurrence and survival, Danish researchers report. In a small study that followed

Via Paul Kelly @iAnaesthetise
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Anesthesiology launches collaboration with hospital in Ghana - Washington University in St. Louis News

Anesthesiology launches collaboration with hospital in Ghana - Washington University in St. Louis News | Anesthesia Updates | Scoop.it
Washington University in St. Louis News
Anesthesiology launches collaboration with hospital in Ghana
Washington University in St.
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Awake? Are Patients Under Anesthesia Really Unconscious?

Awake? Are Patients Under Anesthesia Really Unconscious? | Anesthesia Updates | Scoop.it

The prospect of undergoing surgery while not fully "under" may sound like the stuff of horror movies. But one patient in a thousand remembers moments of awareness while under general anesthesia, physicians estimate. The memories are sometimes neutral images or sounds of the operating room, but occasionally patients report being fully aware of pain, terror, and immobility. Though surgeons scrupulously monitor vital signs such as pulse and blood pressure, anesthesiologists have no clear signal of whether the patient is conscious. But a new study finds that the brain may produce an early-warning signal that consciousness is returning—one that's detectable by electroencephalography (EEG), the recording of neural activity via electrodes on the skull.

 

"We've known since the 1930s that brain activity changes dramatically with increasing doses of anesthetic," says the study's corresponding author, anesthesiologist Patrick Purdon of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. "But monitoring a patient's brain with EEG has never become routine practice."

 

Beginning in the 1990s, some anesthesiologists began using an approach called the bispectral (BIS) index, in which readings from a single electrode are connected to a device that calculates, and displays, a single number indicating where the patient's brain activity falls on a scale of 100 (fully conscious) to zero (a "flatline" EEG). Anything between 40 and 60 is considered the target range for unconsciousness. But this index and other similar ones are only indirect measurements, Purdon explains. In 2011, a team led by anesthesiologist Michael Avidan at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, found that monitoring with the BIS index was slightly less successful at preventing awareness during surgery than the nonbrain-based method of measuring exhaled anesthesia in the patient's breath. Of the 2861 patients monitored with the BIS index, seven had memories of the surgery, whereas only two of 2852 patients whose breath was analyzed remembered anything.

 

Despite that, Purdon and his co-workers were hopeful that an "unconsciousness signature" in the brain could be found. Last year, the team worked with three epilepsy patients who'd had electrodes implanted in their brains in preparation for surgery to reduce their seizures. Recording from single neurons in the cortex, where awareness is thought to reside, the researchers gave the patients an injection of the anesthetic propofol. They asked the volunteers to press a button whenever they heard a tone, recording the activity of the neurons. Loss of consciousness, defined as the point when the patients stopped pressing the button, was immediate—40 seconds after injection. Just as immediately, groups of neurons began to emit a characteristic slow oscillation, a kind of ripple in the cells' electrical field. The neurons weren't entirely inactive, but bursts of activity occurred only at specific points in this oscillation, resulting in inconsistent brain cell activity.

 

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Igor Stakhnyuk's curator insight, August 8, 2013 12:50 AM

I chose this article because many people who have had surgery depend on it being very painless since you are asleep while the procedure is being done, but many people ask the question if they are realy unconsious during the surgery. This article answers the that question.

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Anesthesia breathing circuits

Anesthesia breathing circuits | Anesthesia Updates | Scoop.it

Via Paul Kelly @iAnaesthetise
Anesthesia Education's insight:

Memories. Maybe needed one day

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Rescooped by Anesthesia Education from Workplace Health and Safety
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Reliance on autopilot is now the biggest threat to flight safety.

Reliance on autopilot is now the biggest threat to flight safety. | Anesthesia Updates | Scoop.it
The Verge Reliance on autopilot is now the biggest threat to flight safety, study says The Verge The tendency of commercial airline pilots to rely on automated systems now represents the biggest threat to flight safety around the world, according...

Via David Cant CMIOSH
Anesthesia Education's insight:

Should we be relying on more automation as anesthesiologists?  Parrallels to aviation human factor error increases over the last decade.  #anesthesiaupdates

#anesthesia

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