Student Family Structure in ES1
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Student Family Structure in ES1
Student Family Structures in Early Stage 1
Curated by Andrew Li
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My Family Primary Resources, families, mum, dad, brother, sister

My Family Primary Resources, families, mum, dad, brother, sister | Student Family Structure in ES1 | Scoop.it
My Family Primary Resources, families, mum, dad, brother, sister, grandma, baby, granddad, age, Early Years (EYFS), KS1 & KS2 Primary Teaching Resources
Andrew Li's insight:

This particularly colorful and engaging online resource centers on “All About Me” activities that students can engage in to share aspects of their personal lives, and specifically, their families. There are numerous activities available for teachers to engage students with, including family tree diagram templates and coloring sheets. The resources, which are all presented with pleasing colors and graphics, provide a creative outlet for students to explore and express the structure of their families. One of the activities involves writing a newspaper article, where students are prompted with a line (i.e., “my mum is the best”) and are allowed space below for expressing their throughs. There is even a large space provided where they may paste or draw a picture of a specific family member, just as in an actual newspaper article. In this way, students can already begin to appreciate and learn about different forms of media. This resource is valuable because the activities promote “authentic learning” as described by Newmann and Wehlage (1993). One of the distinguishing features is the “production of discourse, products, and performances that have value ... beyond success in school.” (Gilbert and Hoepper 2011). Through activities in this resource, students are able to produce meaningful works that they can be proud of.

 

“My family” activities in a well-presented and attractive resource, with emphasis on literacy and displays.

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It's My Life . Family | PBS Kids GO!

It's My Life . Family | PBS Kids GO! | Student Family Structure in ES1 | Scoop.it
Information, advice, polls, games, activities and message boards to help pre-teens explore topics such as divorce, stepfamilies, adoption, immigration, green living, and sibling rivalry.
Andrew Li's insight:

The Public Broadcasting Corporation has set up an “It's My Life” series that tackles issues related to everyday life for children and their parents and teachers. The family section of this resource provides a number of quality interactive activities that are pertinent to the structures of students' families. One such activity is “Sidewalk to the Future”, which provides a digital palette for students to compose and illustrate a square as part of a sidewalk describing themselves and their families. This activity can be useful in assessing the level of the structure of students' knowledge, using the SOLO taxonomy described by Biggs and Collis (1982). The level (prestructural through extended abstract) can easily be evaluated based on the intricacy of the “sidewalk” produced by a student. This resource's most important aspect however is its smooth integration of a global perspective into family structures via a dedicated immigration section. It is stressed that almost every non-indigenous person most likely has a family history of immigration. This topic reveals new understandings about the broad topic of family structures and allows teachers to show the topic in a new light, an important component in authentic learning (Gilbert and Hoepper 2011). The site would make an excellent resource for teachers in high density immigrant areas who are looking to cover an important global aspect of student family structures.

 

Immigration as a global perspective of family structures with other activities providing for presentation of students' families.

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The Department of Education - Aboriginal Education - Early childhood

APAC Lesson Plans by Early Childhood phase of development.
Andrew Li's insight:

In exploring family structures and learning about different cultures, it is important for students to be exposed to differences and similarities between their families and Aboriginal family structures. This enhances understanding and respect for other cultures through a common theme, the family. In this resource the keystone lesson centers on the differences between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal families through story telling. The book My Community (about an Aboriginal family from the Kimberley Region) illustrates the structure of a typical Aboriginal family and the roles/activities of each member. The book is compared with Our Home, Bedtime & Families (about a non-Aboriginal family). Afterwards, students should be encouraged to work cooperatively to note and describe similarities and differences between those families and with their own. According to Corden (2000), cooperative learning in groups enhances cognitive development and develops capacity for reflection. Students also benefit from the activity as they are given opportunity to share aspects of their families through linking of ideas with others. The activity may be further used as an assessment task to determine if students were able to accurately portray and compare their family members with those observed in the storybooks. The resource provides the appropriate guidelines and suggestions for other resources to be used (i.e., specific high quality books) to enhance student exposure to Aboriginal family structures.

 

Comparing and contrasting Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal families through storytelling/books.

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Family Lesson Plans, Activities, Printables and Ideas | A to Z Teacher Stuff Themes

Andrew Li's insight:

This resource contains a host of engaging activities that can be used in combination with each other for students to explore and express their family structures. The “My Family & Me Printable Book” activity provides an excellent 9-page template for teachers to use with their early stage 1 students. On each page is a large space for drawing and a simple prompt asking for a specific aspect of the student and his/her family, such as names, enjoyable activities, foods, and toys. A follow-up activity for assessment could be the exchanging and peer reading of each student's completed book. Gilbert and Hoepper (2011) suggest that student engagement in assessment is an excellent way of presenting the goals and assessment criteria of assignments and activities. For example, if a particular student's book was lacking in appropriate responses, his/her peers would notice and better yet, be able to provide feedback to the student. Another particularly enriching activity in the resource is the construction of family crests. Through this activity, students can include a myriad of background information about their families including flags representing their home countries, pictures of foods representing their ethnicity, drawings of family activities, and photos. This social aspect of family structure provides for a multitude of learning activities in all three stages of inquiry.

 

Additional resources and product-producing activities for student expression of family structures.

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Aboriginal Culture - Traditional Life - Social Organisation

Aboriginal Culture - Traditional Life - Social Organisation | Student Family Structure in ES1 | Scoop.it
Here you can find information on aboriginal social organisation and traditional life.
Andrew Li's insight:

This resource is centered on the traditional life, and specifically social/familial organization, of Aboriginal communities. It outlines in detail the ways in which Aboriginal people organize themselves in terms of physical/geographical/religious aspects and social relationships. There is a primary discussion about the complex “kinship system” of their family structures. Two key aspects of this system are that each person in Aboriginal society is named in relation to one another (brother/sister, father/son, and so forth) and that every person must have a defined social position so that structured relationships exist between each person. To teach students about this kinship system, a “stage 1 inquiry” activity could be used to establish a question students can investigate. First, each student could be given a role/standing in family and a particular relationship to their fellow students, just as a real Aboriginal band of 10-20 would (multiple fathers, mothers, brothers, sisters). Then a seminal question is posed, such as “Where do you fit in your family, and what are your responsibilities?” Additional dialogue and play activities could then be introduced to stimulate active and experiential learning, an effective teaching pedagogy. Stage 1 learning activities aim to capture students' interest and capitalize on their background knowledge, which is the goal of this activity. Furthermore, according to Gilbert and Hoepper (2011), “key questions for learning provide the most effective way of meeting learning outcomes in SOSE.”

 

Social organization of Aboriginal communities including the complex kinship system.

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