Anders' A Midsummers Night's Dream
213 views | +0 today
Follow
Anders' A Midsummers Night's Dream
Analyzing A Midsummers Night Dream
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Anders Vaera Doneez
Scoop.it!

A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Literary Criticism)

A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Literary Criticism) | Anders' A Midsummers Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Anders Vaera Doneez's insight:

The author who wrote this article discusses the different aspects of the play. Before beginning the critique, she provides a quick summary for the reader. After the summary, she analyzes the different plots within, along with the iambic pentameter used by Shakespeare. This author uses Puck's aside in the epilogue to support the main point of the argument. Fischer also backs up her arguments in this critique by inserting enough information to validate her points.

 

Fischer, Sandra K. "A Midsummer Night’s Dream." Ebscohost.com. Salem Press, n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2013.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anders Vaera Doneez
Scoop.it!

Theseus (Historical Article)

Theseus (Historical Article) | Anders' A Midsummers Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Anders Vaera Doneez's insight:

The page from the "Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia", 6th Edition tells about the Greek hero Theseus. Shakespeare took this Theseus and molded him into a character that would fit his play. Originally, Theseus was a character in Greek mythology who embarked on a quest to slay an evil monstricity called the Minotaur. Shakespeare took this character along with others (example would be Hippolyta) to create a certain type of setting in his play. He still maintained certain qualities of Theseus. For example, originally Theseus was a Prince, and in "A Midsummers Night's Dream", Theseus is a Duke.

 

"Theseus." Ebscohost.com. Columbia University Press, n.d. Web. 12 Feb. 2013.

more...
Kevin G Taratuta's comment, February 14, 2013 12:48 PM
That pic is sick!
Bradley Shatraw's comment, March 3, 2013 2:16 PM
I agree Kevin! It really shows how courageous Theseus was! That is how Shakespeare used in his play too!
Scooped by Anders Vaera Doneez
Scoop.it!

SHAKESPEARE AND THE NORMAN CONQUEST: ENGLISH IN THE ELIZABETHAN THEATRE (Source)

SHAKESPEARE AND THE NORMAN CONQUEST: ENGLISH IN THE ELIZABETHAN THEATRE (Source) | Anders' A Midsummers Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Anders Vaera Doneez's insight:

The article examines the possibility of Shakespeare being a linguist. The author discusses how "Shakespeare's standing as a linguist can be established most briskly by the claim that he is the only Elizabethan dramatist to write at length in a foreign language" The reader is given further examples of Shakespeare exercising this ability. The author argues that Shakespeare had the ability to "seize the spirit of an original" French, Latin, and Italian person. This article aids and informs the reading of "A MIdsummers Night's Dream". It shows that Shakespeare had a complex understanding of each of his characters and was able to make these characters seem more real by giving them a personality through the way they speak.

 

Watson, G. "SHAKESPEARE AND THE NORMAN CONQUEST: ENGLISH IN THE ELIZABETHAN THEATRE." Ebscohost.com. Virginia Quarterly Review, n.d. Web. 3 Feb. 2013.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anders Vaera Doneez
Scoop.it!

Oberon and Titania (Image)

Oberon and Titania (Image) | Anders' A Midsummers Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Anders Vaera Doneez's insight:

This photo depicts Oberon and Titania in the Shakespearean play "A Midsummers Night's Dream". The contrast between them is clear through the clothing they wear. Oberon wears a black, ragged-looking costume and cape, while Titania wears her long, elegant dress. By this photo, the person looking upon on it can infer that Titania is on the the side of good, and that Oberon is on the side of trickery and mischief. These two are depicted as being opposites, black and white, light and dark.

 

"2011 Photos of A Midsummer Night's Dream at the Utah Shakespeare Festival." (n.d.): n. pag. 2011 Photos of A Midsummer Night's Dream at the Utah Shakespeare Festival. Web. 03 Mar. 2013.

more...
Sarah Lamoureux's comment, March 13, 2013 11:19 PM
I loved your analysis on this picture during your presentation! I thought it was an interesting choice of an image and I agree that the costumes do clearly represent the rivalry between Titania and Oberon. It is a great visual to explain the two fairies and their differences and conflict!
Scooped by Anders Vaera Doneez
Scoop.it!

Animaniacs - A Midsummer Nights Dream (Video)

Anders Vaera Doneez's insight:

This Animaniacs video was created in 1993. It is a take on a small part of "A Midsummer Night's Dream". This video connects old Shakespeare with the modern age. The cartoon has a character who "translates" a monologue told by another. The translator twists the other character's words so that the viewer can relate and understand the happenings of the mini show. This video also adds comic relief by inserting well known figures such as the heroes Batman and Robin and celebrities like Oprah.

 

"Warner Bros" "Animaniacs - A Midsummer Nights Dream." Cartoon. YouTube. YouTube, 28 May 2010. Web. 07 Feb. 2013.

more...
No comment yet.