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Ancient relics found in south China - Xinhua

Ancient relics found in south China - Xinhua | Ancient world | Scoop.it
Ancient relics found in south China Xinhua A 120-square-meter cave was discovered some 10 meters above the water level, dating back to the period between the late Neolithic Age and Zhou Dynasty (about 1,100 BC - 771 BC) said Yang Qingping, research...

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Rescooped by Cassandra Folkerth from Ancient Art History Summary
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The Mystery of the Hanging Garden of Babylon

The Mystery of the Hanging Garden of Babylon | Ancient world | Scoop.it
The legendary 'Hanging Garden of Babylon' has since ancient times been recognised as one of the Seven Wonders of the World – but no trace of it has ever been found

Via Elena Victorero
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Elena Victorero's curator insight, November 24, 2013 11:30 PM

New teory urgue about the real location of the famous garden. The studies suggests that the gardens were not ever done in Babylon, this University of Oxfor specialist signaly  that after Assyria conquered Babylon in 689BC, the Assyrian capital Nineveh may have been seen as the ‘New Babylon’, which could have created the confusion. And added that Babylon land was to flat to conduct the water needed in the terraces.

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How Ancient Embalmers Pulled The Brains And Guts Out Of Mummies

How Ancient Embalmers Pulled The Brains And Guts Out Of Mummies | Ancient world | Scoop.it
We’ve unearthed mummy upon mummy from Egypt, the oldest dating back to 3500BC, but one thing has remained a bit of a mystery: what does the mumm...

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Religion in Ancient Egypt ~ Ancient Egypt Facts

Religion in Ancient Egypt ~ Ancient Egypt Facts | Ancient world | Scoop.it

Today scholars are agreed that the many divinities found in Egyptian temples are to be considered as attributes or intermediaries of the Supreme Being, the One God, the only one recognized and worshipped by the priests, those initiates or wise men of the sanctuaries.

 

At the pinnacle of the Egyptian pantheon there stands a God who is unique, immortal, who was not created, who is invisible and hidden in the inaccessible depths of his own Being. 


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Shonda Brock's curator insight, September 11, 2013 10:27 AM

Fascinating.

Aladin Fazel's curator insight, September 13, 2013 3:26 PM

i think, it must be read,,

abigail's curator insight, October 23, 2013 9:39 PM

Life in ancient Egypt revolved around many abstract objects and believes unlike the Americans but are similar to those who are environmentally located close to  these cultural people. 

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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: The Ancient Greeks and the Formation of Man.

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: The Ancient Greeks and the Formation of Man. | Ancient world | Scoop.it

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Listen to 2,500-year-old music brought back to life

Listen to 2,500-year-old music brought back to life | Ancient world | Scoop.it
Music scholars are recreating ancient Greek songs that haven't been heard for thousands of years. The results aren't very inspiring, but we're finally getting a sense of what the ancients were listening to.

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Ancient Egypt: Life and Death in the Valley of the Kings | Series 1 - 2. Death | Radio Times

Ancient Egypt: Life and Death in the Valley of the Kings | Series 1 - 2. Death | Radio Times | Ancient world | Scoop.it

"Joann Fletcher told us last week how Kha and Merit, 

a Theban couple from 3,500 years ago, passed their days. This week she unravels the elaborate world of their death – more important for an ancient Egyptian, since this world was merely a dress rehearsal for the perfect afterlife." 


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Ancient city unearthed in Iraq may be 3300 years old - NBCNews.com

Ancient city unearthed in Iraq may be 3300 years old - NBCNews.com | Ancient world | Scoop.it
Ancient city unearthed in Iraq may be 3300 years old NBCNews.com A domestic structure, with at least two rooms, that may date to relatively late in the life of the newfound ancient city, perhaps around 2,000 years ago when the Parthian Empire...

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Sarah Kerr's curator insight, October 23, 2013 11:59 PM

This scoop is about a new city that was discovered in Iraq.  The new excavation is exciting and is thought that this city was under the control of the Assyrian Empire. Researchers have given this city site the name but fail to mention it in the description.

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Ancient ruined cities that remain a mystery

Ancient ruined cities that remain a mystery | Ancient world | Scoop.it

CRUMBLING walls. Breathtaking temples. Mysterious cities built entirely underground.

They are the astounding feats of architecture that have been left to decay for centuries.

But while they may be in ruins, the sites of the world's most ancient and intriguing cities continue to wow travellers.

From the popular Machu Picchu site in Peru, to the Pompeii ruins and the lesser-known Derinkuyu site in Turkey, here are eight amazing ruined cities that remain shrouded in mystery - or remain perplexing to this day, according to the science website io9.com.

One thing's for sure, the world is a fascinating place.

 

starts with :

1. Palenque, Mexico

 

 


Via David Connolly
Cassandra Folkerth's insight:

I love reading about the ancient architecture. Its just so cool. How did tehy come up with that and build ALL that without any modern technology.

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Sarah Kerr's curator insight, October 10, 2013 11:15 PM

This scoop has a lot of great interesting facts on ancient cities that are now long forgotten but still widely popular in the traveling world. Some of the cities we are studying in class such as Catal Huyuk and Pompeii show up in this article.

Sarah Kerr's curator insight, November 29, 2013 3:25 PM

I chose this scoop because, it is fascinating to think that there are places out there in the world that are full of mystery and unanswered questions. The places mentioned in this article are,  Great ZImbabwe, Cahokia in the U.S., Machu Pichu in Peru, Catalhoyuk in Turkey, Pompeii in Italy,  Palenqus in Mexico and Derinkuyu also in Turkey. 

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BBC - History: Egyptians

BBC - History: Egyptians | Ancient world | Scoop.it
Enter the world of the ancient Egyptians. Find out why their mysterious civilisation, gods, godesses and pyramids capture the imagination.

Via Jo Lincoln
Cassandra Folkerth's insight:

Reading about the religious beliefs was so interesting. I didn't know they mummified pets to preserve them for eternity. 

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joseph mora's curator insight, September 27, 2013 3:49 PM

egyptian monuments, beliefs, godsand godesses. 

Kenneth Snyder's curator insight, April 11, 12:11 PM

After reading this article it has become clear to me that the fall of the old kingdom did more good for egypt than bad. Although many people died during the short lived 8th and 9th dynasties due to famine and drought, the decentralization of government that resulted from it produced social change once the the government was re-established.

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Egyptian Pyramid Construction Part 3 ... - Ancient-egypt.info

Egyptian Pyramid Construction Part 3 ... - Ancient-egypt.info | Ancient world | Scoop.it

Arts. Child Category 1. Sub Child Category 1; Sub Child Category 2; Sub Child Category 3. Child Category 2; Child Category 3; Child Category 4. Maps; Names. Childcare; Doctors. Pyramids; Religion; Timeline; Ancient Egypt ...


Via Amber Coupal
Cassandra Folkerth's insight:

that's crazy. The actual building of the pyramid structure wasnt this huge complex process. 

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Jordan Varona's curator insight, January 18, 1:05 AM

An interesting new theory on how the pyramids were constructed. Cool.

Rocio Rodriguez's curator insight, January 23, 12:38 PM

A Egyptologists claims that egyptians did not use a ramp nor sledge to construct the pyramid. Tellesfen bases his argument on an observation of three men moving large stones to the edge of the nile river. 

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The curse of Tutankhamen

The curse of Tutankhamen | Ancient world | Scoop.it
The story of Tutankhamen.It was 1922, in Egypt in Valley of the Kings, an archeologist named Howard Carter was hunting for the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamen which he believed was a gold mine untouched by the grave robbers.

Via webzeest
Cassandra Folkerth's insight:

it was so intriguing reading about KIng Tut. You hear sso much about him and fianlly reading about him is a whole different story. 

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Burials: Interpreting How People May Have Lived

Burials: Interpreting How People May Have Lived | Ancient world | Scoop.it
Burial sites excavated by archaeologists can provide vast amounts of information regarding how people may have lived. For example, one can observe the fashions worn by the deceased and sometimes their friends and family.

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Mummies reveal that clogged arteries plagued the ancient world, even hunter gatherers with no food supply

Mummies reveal that clogged arteries plagued the ancient world, even hunter gatherers with no food supply | Ancient world | Scoop.it

Clogged arteries are seen as the quintessential symptom of an unhealthy modern lifestyle. But the condition was common across the ancient world, even among active hunter–gatherers with no access to junk food, a study of mummies has found.

 

“There’s a belief that if we go back in time, everything’s going to be OK,” says cardiologist Greg Thomas of the University of California, Irvine, a senior member of the study team. “But these mummies still have coronary artery disease.”

 

In atherosclerosis, arteries become narrowed and hardened by plaques — made up of cholesterol and immune cells called macrophages — that build up in their walls. The condition can lead to heart attacks, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases and is the leading cause of death in the developed world.

 

A lack of exercise and a diet high in saturated fat — both of which increase levels of 'bad' cholesterol in the blood — are thought to increase the risk of plaques building up. This has led to the suggestion that to avoid heart disease we should try to live more like our hunter–gatherer ancestors, on a diet of unprocessed foods high in protein and unsaturated fats.

 

To find out if that’s really true, Thomas and his colleagues performed CT scans on 137 mummies from four very different ancient populations: Egyptian, Peruvian, the Ancestral Puebloans of southwest America and the Unangans of the Aleutian Islands in Alaska. The Egyptians were artificially embalmed, whereas the other bodies were  preserved naturally by very dry or very cold conditions. The four groups had different lifestyles — the Ancestral Puebloans were forager–farmers, for example, whereas the Unangan were hunter–gatherers with an exclusively marine diet.

 

The researchers checked the mummies’ scans for calcified plaques in the wall of an artery or along the expected course of an artery. They diagnosed probable or definite atherosclerosis in 47 (34%) of the 137 mummies, and in all four populations, ranging from 25% of the 51 ancient Peruvians to 60% of the five Unangans.

 

The researchers say that they found a level of disease equivalent to that in modern populations — a result Thomas describes as “a shock”. “Now we’ve scanned the common man and woman and they’ve got the same disease,” says Thomas. Rather than excess cholesterol, he suggests that high levels of inflammation — caused by smoke inhalation or chronic infection, for instance — may have triggered the disease in these individuals. But Thomas says that cardiovascular disease should not now be seen as simply a consequence of an unhealthy lifestyle. “We’ve oversold the ability to stop heart disease,” he says. “We can slow it down, but to think we can prevent it is unrealistic.”

 

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Cassandra Folkerth's insight:

This is crazy! I guess I shouldnt be too suprised. But the fact that people back in the ancient world had clogged arteries is amazing to me. For some reason  thought since they didnt have processed foods and were most likely eating healthier than we do that they'd have better health. Especially people who were mummified. They were the people with money and still were killed due to poor health. Were not as different as I thought. 

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Curious History: Ancient Egyptians May Have Traded With the New World

Curious History: Ancient Egyptians May Have Traded With the New World | Ancient world | Scoop.it
Curious History: Ancient Egyptians May Have Traded With the New World The Epoch Times A mummy of ancient Egypt is displayed during the exhibition "Treasures of the World's Cultures: The British Museum After 250 Years" in the Capital Museum on March...

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Aladin Fazel's curator insight, November 29, 2013 3:58 PM

very interesting theme.. but may just for me,,, therefore rather not share into any group..!!?

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Pyramid Age love story comes to life in Egyptian tomb's vivid color - NBC News.com

Pyramid Age love story comes to life in Egyptian tomb's vivid color - NBC News.com | Ancient world | Scoop.it
She was a priestess named Meretites, and he was a singer named Kahai, who performed at the pharaoh's palace. They lived about 4,400...

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Kristine Rapisura's curator insight, January 25, 2:30 AM

There many embracing pictures between two couple in the pyramid era which makes this very interesting. We can see that the woman was known as an equal rather than below man. 

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Ancient Egyptians were born into strict class structures

Ancient Egyptians were born into strict class structures | Ancient world | Scoop.it
Students in Nancy Sullivan’s sixth-grade class at Frederick Nerge Elementary School in Roselle asked, “In ancient Egypt, how were the Pharaoh and other important social classes chosen?”

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Aladin Fazel's curator insight, October 11, 2013 2:53 PM

a good question!! :D

Cindy Garcia's curator insight, October 19, 2013 7:11 AM

In this scoop it Article, the mention the Structures of the Egyptian’s Culture. The Egyptians are known to have Strong Strict Class structures. Ancient Egyptian Culture to have “organized, disciplined, and religious society”. In Egypt the people were not chosen for their class but born into it. The Social classes were brought down from generation to generation. They believed their society would stay strong if they kept this tradition. ("Ancient Egyptians Were Born into Strict Class Structures." Daily Herald. Paddock Publications Inc.; 2013.)

Kristine Rapisura's curator insight, January 25, 2:34 AM

This link gave good knowledge on how social life was constructed. It was very hard to change your destiny and they believe that having this strict system makes a strong environment. Also explained how to become a Pharoah.

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The 13 Biggest Assholes in Greek Mythology

The 13 Biggest Assholes in Greek Mythology | Ancient world | Scoop.it
It’s a mystery why ancient Greeks worshipped their gods, because their gods were all complete dickheads. They could — and did! — steal, rape, torture, or kill pretty much anyone at any time.

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Scientists Rewrite Timeline of Ancient Egypt's First Dynasty | Archaeology | Sci-News.com

Scientists Rewrite Timeline of Ancient Egypt's First Dynasty | Archaeology | Sci-News.com | Ancient world | Scoop.it
British archaeologists led by Dr Michael Dee have been able for the first time to set a robust timeline for the first eight kings of ancient Egypt.

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Ancient relics found in south China - Xinhua

Ancient relics found in south China - Xinhua | Ancient world | Scoop.it
Ancient relics found in south China Xinhua A 120-square-meter cave was discovered some 10 meters above the water level, dating back to the period between the late Neolithic Age and Zhou Dynasty (about 1,100 BC - 771 BC) said Yang Qingping, research...

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Rescooped by Cassandra Folkerth from Archaeology News
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ARCHAEOLOGY - Excavations to begin in ancient Sebastapolis after two decades

ARCHAEOLOGY - Excavations to begin in ancient Sebastapolis after two decades | Ancient world | Scoop.it

After a 22-year hiatus, archaeological excavations will begin once again in the ancient city of Sebastapolis in the Central Anatolian province of Tokat’s Sulusaray district.

Sulusaray district administrator Yaşar Kemal Yılmaz said Sebastapolis was known as one of the most significant ancient cities in the Central Black Sea and Northeastern Anatolian region.

Yılmaz said the ancient city had been the capital of a number of states in the past. “One of the leading Roman cities, Sebastapolis, is regarded as a ‘second Ephesus’ by archaeologists and experts. It is a highly significant area. But because of some technical problems and a lack of interest, the excavations that were carried out between 1987 and 1991 were insufficient. The ancient city is in a bad and idle situation. We are doing our best for the protection of ancient pieces there with the help of security forces. Excavations should begin as soon as possible to unearth these works and present them to the world,” he said.

 


Via David Connolly
Cassandra Folkerth's insight:

Archeology is so cool. I wonder what they'll find or learn from excavating finally after 22 years. 

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Greek Mythology: God and Goddesses | The Chronicle Watch

Greek Mythology: God and Goddesses | The Chronicle Watch | Ancient world | Scoop.it
Published on Feb 1, 2013. Greek Mythology is the body of myths and teachings that belong to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world, and the origins and significance of their own cult ...

Via Catherine Ingham, Hanna Mulla
Cassandra Folkerth's insight:

It's so cool how we've been able to learn about the gods and goddesses  of different cultures and old societies. 

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Images of Iraq - Views of the ancient Sumerian city of Ur. | TEHRKOT MEDIA

Images of Iraq - Views of the ancient Sumerian city of Ur. | TEHRKOT MEDIA | Ancient world | Scoop.it

A bedouin guard is seen here keeping watch over recently excavated ruins, part of the complex which surrounds the Ziggurat of Ur in the desert of southern Iraq.


Via Amber Coupal
Cassandra Folkerth's insight:

How interesting reading about the Mesopotamian people.

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Egyptian dog mummy infested with bloodsucking parasites - NBC News.com

Egyptian dog mummy infested with bloodsucking parasites - NBC News.com | Ancient world | Scoop.it
A dog mummy has revealed the first archaeological evidence of bloodsucking parasites plaguing Fido's ancestors in Egypt during the...

Via Shonda Brock
Cassandra Folkerth's insight:

The act of mummification is such a weird and interesting subject. So learning more about it and what happenss along with it was so informative. 

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Aladin Fazel's curator insight, October 4, 2013 2:01 PM

even dogs!

Amanda Duvall's curator insight, November 5, 2013 7:06 PM

This is about a puppy that died young because of  bloodsucking parasites. In the right ear and coat include the common brown tick.In  the Ancient writting  they found out this was not proven till now that these parasites exist.

Rescooped by Cassandra Folkerth from Ancient Egypt and Nubia
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Shotslot: Turin Pharaohs

Shotslot: Turin Pharaohs | Ancient world | Scoop.it
A series of photographs from the Museum of Egyptology, Turin, Italy

Via Shonda Brock
Cassandra Folkerth's insight:

Seeing all the pictures and getting to view all the Pharaohs graves was very enlightening. 

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ARCE-NOLA's curator insight, October 2, 2013 11:04 AM

Some wonderful photos from the Turin Museum of Egyptology.

Aladin Fazel's curator insight, October 4, 2013 1:59 PM

very interesting issue though, can't see the clip... it's just for another world!! :D

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ANCIENT GRAINS - Homepage of Mark Nesbitt and Delwen Samuel

ANCIENT GRAINS - Homepage of Mark Nesbitt and Delwen Samuel | Ancient world | Scoop.it

Outstanding site for all things grainy and seedy in the ancient near east -

 

We both work in archaeobotany - studying the archaeology of plants.

Delwen Samuel’s interests include bread and beer in ancient Egypt, cereals and nutrition in the Old World, and food microscopy and other techniques of residue analysis. She is based in the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Kings College London.

Mark Nesbitt’s interests are in the prehistory and history of plant use in the Near East, especially Turkey, in all aspects of wheat and other Old World cereals, and in the beginnings of farming. Although still publishing in these areas, his day job is on current-day aspects of botany at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

On our website you can find out more about our work, and the places where we have done fieldwork, and download our publications. We would be glad to receive copies or PDFs of your publications.


Via diana buja, Eve Emshwiller
Cassandra Folkerth's insight:

Reading about how grains have been used back in the ancient times is fascinating. I didnt know that they made beer back in ancient egypt. I thougt that was kind of a modern day thing. Its just so intruiging how people can find out what to do with the weirdest things. How would you even think to make beer back then? We have breweries now and big fancy machines. Its just so intersting. 

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