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Archaeology strains German-Turkish relations

Archaeology strains German-Turkish relations | Ancient Ottomans | Scoop.it
An argument between Germany and Turkey about ancient treasures is escalating. Turkey wants its treasures back, but German archaeologists say Turkish sites are being exploited for tourism.

 

Archaeology often has a lot to do with politics - the current argument between Germany and Turkey is a prime example. Hermann Parzinger, head of the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation, last December accused Turkey of displaying "almost chauvinistic behavior." In reply, the Turkish culture minister Ömer Celik told German news magazine "Der Spiegel" that he demanded an apology, and he asked for five ancient objects to be returned that are currently shown in museums in Berlin. He claims they were taken out of Turkey illegally. Parzinger rejects any accusations of illegality for three of these objects: In December 2012, he said that the torso of the Fisherman of Aphrodisias, the sarcophagus from the Haci Ibrahim Veli tomb and a 13th-century prayer niche were all acquired legally.

But "legal" is a fluid concept in the world of archaeology. The export of ancient treasures from the Ottoman Empire has been prohibited by law since 1884. At the same time though, it wasn't unusual to share the treasures discovered in excavations with teams from abroad. Special permission was often given to take objects out of the country, and there was a flourishing black market. The issue is often less a matter of legality than of morality.

But it is clear that political confrontation and rigid demands don't help anybody, including Turkey. The habit of reclaiming archaeological finds could come back to haunt Istanbul if Lebanon decides to ask for the return of the famous sarcophagus of Alexander. It was taken to Istanbul's Archaeological Museum in 1887, during the time of the Ottoman Empire.


Via David Connolly
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ARCHAEOLOGY - Ephesus ancient city meets sea again

ARCHAEOLOGY - Ephesus ancient city meets sea again | Ancient Ottomans | Scoop.it
Famous for its massive theater and ancient library, Ephesus continues to be a leader for Turkey’s tourism...

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Charles Fellows in Aphrodisias – Biblical Archaeology Society

Charles Fellows in Aphrodisias – Biblical Archaeology Society | Ancient Ottomans | Scoop.it
Charles Fellows in Aphrodisias

 

British archaeologist and explorer Sir Charles Fellows (1799–1860) discovered the ruins of a number of ancient cities in Asia Minor (modern Turkey), including Xanthus, the ancient capital of Lycia, which he excavated under the sponsorship of the British Museum but he funded personally. He was knighted in 1845 for his assistance in having marble reliefs and monuments from this area brought to England. Public response to their London exhibit was sensational.
On his way to Lycia, Fellows spent three days at Aphrodisias. The following account of his visit to Aphrodisias is taken from the meticulously documented and illustrated report he presented to the British Museum, published as An Account of Discoveries in Lycia, being a Journal Kept during a Second Excursion in Asia Minor (1840). In it he describes the relationship of the pagan and Christian ruins at the site.


Via David Connolly
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David Connolly's curator insight, February 9, 2013 3:11 AM
An Early Account of Turkey's Roman and Christian City
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The Intriguing Ancient Underground City of Derinkuyu

The Intriguing Ancient Underground City of Derinkuyu | Ancient Ottomans | Scoop.it

Long ago, in the region surrounding Nevsehir and Kayseri, in central Turkey, an ancient people built, or rather dug, over 200 underground cities. The deepest of these, under the present day town of Derinkuyu, delves over 250 feet below the Earth’s surface, and boasts numerous tunnels, halls, meeting rooms, wells and passages.

Because the city was carved from existing caves and underground structures that had first formed naturally, there is no way to discern, with traditional archaeological methods of dating, when exactly Derinkuyu was built. As such, and with ties to the Hittites, Phrygians and Persians, Derinkuyu presents a fascinating riddle for ancient mystery enthusiasts.

Long ago, in the region surrounding Nevsehir and Kayseri, in central Turkey, an ancient people built, or rather dug, over 200 underground cities. The deepest of these, under the present day town of Derinkuyu, delves over 250 feet below the Earth’s surface, and boasts numerous tunnels, halls, meeting rooms, wells and passages.

Because the city was carved from existing caves and underground structures that had first formed naturally, there is no way to discern, with traditional archaeological methods of dating, when exactly Derinkuyu was built. As such, and with ties to the Hittites, Phrygians and Persians, Derinkuyu presents a fascinating riddle for ancient mystery enthusiasts.


Read more at http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/09/intriguing-ancient-underground-city-derinkuyu/#QHWQFczIYSheStzG.99

Long ago, in the region surrounding Nevsehir and Kayseri, in central Turkey, an ancient people built, or rather dug, over 200 underground cities. The deepest of these, under the present day town of Derinkuyu, delves over 250 feet below the Earth’s surface, and boasts numerous tunnels, halls, meeting rooms, wells and passages.

Because the city was carved from existing caves and underground structures that had first formed naturally, there is no way to discern, with traditional archaeological methods of dating, when exactly Derinkuyu was built. As such, and with ties to the Hittites, Phrygians and Persians, Derinkuyu presents a fascinating riddle for ancient mystery enthusiasts.


Read more at http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/09/intriguing-ancient-underground-city-derinkuyu/#QHWQFczIYSheStzG.99

Long ago, in the region surrounding Nevsehir and Kayseri, in central Turkey, an ancient people built, or rather dug, over 200 underground cities. The deepest of these, under the present day town of Derinkuyu, delves over 250 feet below the Earth’s surface, and boasts numerous tunnels, halls, meeting rooms, wells and passages.

Because the city was carved from existing caves and underground structures that had first formed naturally, there is no way to discern, with traditional archaeological methods of dating, when exactly Derinkuyu was built. As such, and with ties to the Hittites, Phrygians and Persians, Derinkuyu presents a fascinating riddle for ancient mystery enthusiasts.


Read more at http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/09/intriguing-ancient-underground-city-derinkuyu/#QHWQFczIYSheStzG.99

Long ago, in the region surrounding Nevsehir and Kayseri, in central Turkey, an ancient people built, or rather dug, over 200 underground cities. The deepest of these, under the present day town of Derinkuyu, delves over 250 feet below the Earth’s surface, and boasts numerous tunnels, halls, meeting rooms, wells and passages.

Because the city was carved from existing caves and underground structures that had first formed naturally, there is no way to discern, with traditional archaeological methods of dating, when exactly Derinkuyu was built. As such, and with ties to the Hittites, Phrygians and Persians, Derinkuyu presents a fascinating riddle for ancient mystery enthusiasts.


Read more at http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/09/intriguing-ancient-underground-city-derinkuyu/#QHWQFczIYSheStzG.99


Via David Connolly
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JERRY KITH's curator insight, January 15, 2014 3:13 PM

What baffles me is many ancient civilizations lack the resources (pneumatic tools, electric drills, bull-dozers, etc) to create such a magnicificant underground cities. Or perhaps, they did have access to modern-like tools. We have an assumption that they don't, but until the day we find concrete evidence, the question still remains a mystery in my mind.