Ancient Mesopotamia
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Mesopotamia - The British Museum

Mesopotamia - The British Museum | Ancient Mesopotamia | Scoop.it

The British Museum has some great information on this site - be sure to click through the links near the bottom of the pages to get "deeper" into each topic.


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Amanda Duvall's curator insight, October 28, 2013 6:54 PM

This article about Mesopotamia is very interging it talks about the Gods of Mesopotamia, there life style, and there culture. It also talks about what the word mesopotamia means in Greek which it means land between the rivers. It talks about how the ancient mesopotamians belived in the after life and also belived in demons.   There were alot of Gods but there were 5 major ones they were the Sun,Moon,wind,salt water,freshwater. Each city was protected by a God and each city had a Ziggurat which is a temple were the city preist would pray,chant, and make offerings to the Gods. Each year the peoples when they harvest there crops they pay crops as tax then the priest would offer the harvest to the Gods.

Jordan Varona's curator insight, January 18, 2014 1:03 AM

Really cool stuff in here. Particularly fascinating architecture and art.

Mark Townsend's curator insight, January 23, 2014 7:16 PM

This website gives you quality information about Ancient Mesopotamia. You can click through a handful of different categories to learn about various subjects. This website even allows us to listen to stories, participate in challenges and get a virtual tour.

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Bahrain history slowly rises from sands

Bahrain history slowly rises from sands | Ancient Mesopotamia | Scoop.it

More than 4,000 years ago, Dilmun merchants traveled from Mesopotamia to the Indus River, titans of trade and culture before rise of the empires of the Persians or the Ottomans

Over a millennia, the civilization that Dilmun created on the back of trading in pearls, copper and dates as far as South Asia faded into the encroaching sands. It wasn't until an excavation by Danish archaeologists in the 1950s that its past was rediscovered.

Now, with Bahrain in a deepening political crisis between its Sunni rulers and majority Shiite population, the connection to ancient Dilmun is one of the few unifying symbols on the island. It also is a rare and vivid look at pre-Islamic life in a region with few sites celebrating cultures before the time of the Prophet Muhammad.


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Ryley Caron's curator insight, September 19, 2013 9:17 PM

This is amazing how these buildings are still standing, or what is left of them at least. They are so beautiful, but it is weird to see how much buildings have changed. In one of the pictures, you can the modern day buildings in the background of the ancient buildings.

Kasey Saeturn's curator insight, September 28, 2013 10:10 PM

Never have I heard in history of these Dilmun merchants. They sound like big travelers because who could know the distance from Mesopotamia and the Indus River and knowing that back then there were no cars the distance and time from could be months or even years of travel which is crazy because we get around so easily nowadays and even walking from close distances can be problematic to people of today.

abigail's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:32 PM

mesopotamia forms one part of all the ancient trading that has formed the negociations that all countries have till todays date. 

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Photo Essay: Archaeology opportunity in Turkey (Includes first-hand account)

Photo Essay:  Archaeology opportunity in Turkey (Includes first-hand account) | Ancient Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
Turkey is an archaeologist's dream. Not only does it offer amazing Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, Byzantium, and Ottoman ruins, it also offers yet un-explored sites for those interested in archaeology.

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David Connolly's curator insight, January 30, 2013 3:57 PM

If you ever ever get a chance to go to Turkey!   -  Just go!