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Ancient Links: Plumbing and Toilets in Ancient Rome

Ancient Links: Plumbing and Toilets in Ancient Rome | Ancient History | Scoop.it

Ancient Living - plumbing in ancient Rome


Via Barbara Falkinburg, HGI Middle School Library, claudia patino
Gabriel Rodriguez's insight:

it's interesting to think that in ancient times only the rich could have access to toilets. 

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Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, March 6, 2014 11:25 PM

I remember hearing somewhere that the Roman are as old to us and the ancient Egyptians are to the Romans. I cannot believe that even that long ago that people had public access to plumbing; not only that but many had it in their homes as well.

Chase Lee's curator insight, March 8, 2014 2:41 AM

Good for them. If that is what they were used for, then good for them. I am a fan of plumbing. When i look at it that's not really what i see. it looks more artistic than practical.

Patrick Kwong's curator insight, March 9, 2014 4:59 AM

The plumbing system in Rome is an extraordinary feature among the many architecture such as aqueducts and roads. The Romans had a “perfected” version of the ancient pipeline, as public toilets and private homes were connected to a main drainage system, which is comparable to our extremely vast pipeline throughout America. It’s impressive that these Romans were so ahead of their time, but unfortunate that only the higher class could be allowed to live …more hygienically, as the poor  would use urine to launder clothes.

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Rescooped by Gabriel Rodriguez from Science News
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Mysterious 'Winged' Structure from Ancient Rome Discovered | Roman Archaeology & The Iceni People | Roman Empire & Roman Temples | LiveScience

Mysterious 'Winged' Structure from Ancient Rome Discovered | Roman Archaeology & The Iceni People | Roman Empire & Roman Temples | LiveScience | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Archaeologists have uncovered a mysterious winged structure that dates to ancient Rome and has no parallel. They suggest the structure was a shrine or temple, or it may have been a temporary structure for a celebration, archaeologists say.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
Gabriel Rodriguez's insight:

Since the building wasn't meant for long term purpose, I wonder what it was used for.

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10 Famous Gladiators From Ancient Rome - Listverse

10 Famous Gladiators From Ancient Rome - Listverse | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Gladiators were the athletic superstars of Ancient Rome. Their battles in the arena drew thousands of fans, including the most important men of the day.

Via David Walp
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Ancient Links: Plumbing and Toilets in Ancient Rome

Ancient Links: Plumbing and Toilets in Ancient Rome | Ancient History | Scoop.it

Ancient Living - plumbing in ancient Rome


Via Barbara Falkinburg, HGI Middle School Library, claudia patino
Gabriel Rodriguez's insight:

it's interesting to think that in ancient times only the rich could have access to toilets. 

more...
Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, March 6, 2014 11:25 PM

I remember hearing somewhere that the Roman are as old to us and the ancient Egyptians are to the Romans. I cannot believe that even that long ago that people had public access to plumbing; not only that but many had it in their homes as well.

Chase Lee's curator insight, March 8, 2014 2:41 AM

Good for them. If that is what they were used for, then good for them. I am a fan of plumbing. When i look at it that's not really what i see. it looks more artistic than practical.

Patrick Kwong's curator insight, March 9, 2014 4:59 AM

The plumbing system in Rome is an extraordinary feature among the many architecture such as aqueducts and roads. The Romans had a “perfected” version of the ancient pipeline, as public toilets and private homes were connected to a main drainage system, which is comparable to our extremely vast pipeline throughout America. It’s impressive that these Romans were so ahead of their time, but unfortunate that only the higher class could be allowed to live …more hygienically, as the poor  would use urine to launder clothes.

Rescooped by Gabriel Rodriguez from Ancient History News
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Egypt: Sarcophagus leads to the tomb of a previously unknown pharaoh, from 3,600 years ago

Egypt: Sarcophagus leads to the tomb of a previously unknown pharaoh, from 3,600 years ago | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Archaeologists working at the southern Egyptian site of Abydos have discovered the tomb of a previously unknown pharaoh: Woseribre Senebkay -- and the first material proof of a forgotten Abydos Dynasty, ca.

Via Raymund Cruz
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Raymund Cruz's curator insight, January 22, 2014 4:05 PM

They found a corpes that believed of a remains of the Pharoah, Woseribre Senebkay. Its amazing how they can tell whom it belongs to by DNA.

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"Haunted" Maya Underwater Cave Holds Human Bones

"Haunted" Maya Underwater Cave Holds Human Bones | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Underwater archaeologists have found human bones at the bottom of a Maya cenote in Mexico.

Via Raymund Cruz
Gabriel Rodriguez's insight:

It's fascinating to find remains of ancient civilizations.  It's had to imagine the world was such a different place than it is now..

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Raymund Cruz's curator insight, January 16, 2014 2:11 PM

Archaeologists found an underwater cave in Mexico. They dove and were surprised of what things are discovered and the cave itself was huge just enough for them to roam and see human bones from years back.

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Geneticists Try to Figure Out When the Illiad Was Published

Geneticists Try to Figure Out When the Illiad Was Published | Ancient History | Scoop.it
When was The Iliad actually written? To answer that question, you might turn to a historian or a literary scholar. But geneticists wanted a crack at it, too

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List, Tom Randall, Casandra Pricyla Alarcon
Gabriel Rodriguez's insight:

Very different approach on trying to date something back to it's original creation.  Can genetics be used to date back other historical treasure's also?

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, March 1, 2013 12:58 PM

I hesitate to begin with a question that may reveal more about my own ignorance than anything else.

 

Having for so long been a story passed down through generations strictly in an oral tradition, I can't imagine that there weren't many, versions of the story being told, all more or less similar at the core, but ranging in specific vocabulary used; sort of like what used to happen when we played the game called telephone. One listener, might remember the story fairly well, but memory might cause a blip or two when that listener retold the story. When the second listener retold the story more blips... and so on. And two listeners in that "first audience" might tell two slightly different blipped versions to four listeners each of whom might have told four different audiences four different blipped versions.

 

Recognizing that the original storytellers were far more attentive than 8 year old boys nervous about whispering into the ears of 8 year old girls, I'll assume that the source materials used in this intriguing story are "relatively" stable versions of the words that found their way into the earliest published versions of the story.

 

I'm actually more interested in the fact that those with non-literary educational backgrounds are bringing their talents to the study of literature. In previous scoops I've appreciated the work being done in neuroscience related to tracking brain functions when reading literature.

 

The vocabulary lesson described in this article as it was used by geneticists attempting to determine a possible date of the publication of the Illiad might be more interesting to a significant percentage of our students than merely looking at vocabulary as a study of prefixes, roots, and suffixes.

 

Anyone who has tried to maintain an interest in older literature in spite of its antiquated vocabulary knows that constant interruptions of the engaging momentum of the suspension of disbelief is not always as successful as it is annoying to many students. 

 

Great literature does not stand alone in the real world. It is influenced and reflects history, psychology, culture, cartography, philosophy, sociology, politics, marketing, intellectual perception,... all sorts of elements beyond the siloed English Department. 

 

As those of us who focus upon the value of literature in the 21st century valiantly come to its defense, it is essential that we not fight that good fight alone. It is too easy to dismiss literature educators as being biased in times when "practical" is a trump card in budget discussions among colleagues whose understanding of the practical impacts of the difficult to measure outcomes of literary reading is less well informed. 

 

To be able to reference more informed views of allies coming to the defense of literary reading from beyond the English department; from the sciences and the business departments ((see: This is Your Brain on Jane Austin, The Neuroscience of Your Brain on Fiction, and "If You Want to Lead, Read") is an invaluable asset to offset assumptions of bias when we tilt at the budgetary windmills alone.

 

And, in gratitude, we ought to also be careful in our own contributions to the conversations when they turn to the value of supporting other curricular areas that we may find ourselves less well informed about. 

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 

 

Aaronee's curator insight, February 18, 2014 6:57 PM

They traced the words on the lliad like you would do genes. They used a database of concepts and words. the word database is named Swadesh word list, and its has about 200 words that exist in everyone language and culture, like water and dog.

 

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Can Privatization Save the Treasures of Ancient Greece?

Can Privatization Save the Treasures of Ancient Greece? | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Can Privatization Save the Treasures of Ancient Greece?

Via International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works
Gabriel Rodriguez's insight:

I think it's important to preserve the history of Greece, and the history of the world for that matter.  We shouldn't destroy historical monuments or take over historical land for new age purposes, we should respect that history and leave these locations as they are.

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Patrick Kwong's curator insight, February 21, 2014 3:33 PM

Stephen Miller is a history nut focused on the preservation of ancient Greece's culture and history, or just culture and history in general. He feels that there should be more investment in private ownership of archaeological and historical sites to promote the value of ancient history.

claudia patino's curator insight, February 24, 2014 8:18 PM

The question is to let the private sector take control of the archeology findings because Greece owes money to other countries. No, because the country can increase there ticket sells to museums, and archeological sites. Greece is so rich in history the government needs to use it to its advantage. Greece does get millions of tourist each year.

Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, February 28, 2014 7:33 PM

I think it very sad that such cultural treasures cannot be maintained either through taxes or on their popularity alone. Although if these are here for the foreseeable future and are available for anyone to see (if they want) then I am okay with this.

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Alexander the Great – the greatest leader of all time?

Alexander the Great – the greatest leader of all time? | Ancient History | Scoop.it

Alexander the Great - the greatest leader of all time?


Via Barbara Falkinburg
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Ancient City Discovered Underwater Solves Enigma That Puzzled ...

Ancient City Discovered Underwater Solves Enigma That Puzzled ... | Ancient History | Scoop.it
An ancient Egyptian city found 6.5 km off of modern Egypt's coastline reveals fascinating relics of Heracleion, also known as Thonis. The city's ruins are located in Abu Qir Bay, originally existing near Alexandria, 2.5 km off the ...

Via Jordan Varona
Gabriel Rodriguez's insight:

Much of the ocean is yet to be explored, who knows whats down there? The geography of the world has changed drastically and continues to change. Will we be an underwater civilization one day?

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Rescooped by Gabriel Rodriguez from Ancient History, Early Civilization
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Total War Rome II revisits the battlefields of ancient Europe - The Week UK

Total War Rome II revisits the battlefields of ancient Europe - The Week UK | Ancient History | Scoop.it
The Week UK
Total War Rome II revisits the battlefields of ancient Europe
The Week UK
The latest instalment in the Total War historical strategy video game series, Rome II, has been released in the UK.

Via Edwin Martinez
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Rescooped by Gabriel Rodriguez from Ancient History News
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"Haunted" Maya Underwater Cave Holds Human Bones

"Haunted" Maya Underwater Cave Holds Human Bones | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Underwater archaeologists have found human bones at the bottom of a Maya cenote in Mexico.

Via Raymund Cruz
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Raymund Cruz's curator insight, January 16, 2014 2:11 PM

Archaeologists found an underwater cave in Mexico. They dove and were surprised of what things are discovered and the cave itself was huge just enough for them to roam and see human bones from years back.

Gabriel Rodriguez's curator insight, February 28, 2014 11:19 PM

It's fascinating to find remains of ancient civilizations.  It's had to imagine the world was such a different place than it is now..

Rescooped by Gabriel Rodriguez from Paleolithic
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Kuwait''s historical sites reflect ancient human history - Kuwait News Agency

Kuwait''s historical sites reflect ancient human history - Kuwait News Agency | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Kuwait News Agency Kuwait''s historical sites reflect ancient human history Kuwait News Agency KUWAIT, Oct 26 (KUNA) -- Kuwait's historical sites reflect glimpse of ancient human history which could provide answers regarding the events that took...

Via Parker Rhodes
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Neolithic stone puts spotlight on Perthshire glen's ancient history - The Courier

Neolithic stone puts spotlight on Perthshire glen's ancient history - The Courier | Ancient History | Scoop.it
The Courier
Neolithic stone puts spotlight on Perthshire glen's ancient history
The Courier
The Scottish Wildlife Trust made the exciting archaeological discovery while repairing a wall in Balnaguard Glen.
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Rescooped by Gabriel Rodriguez from Ancient World
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10 Innovations That Built Ancient Rome — HISTORY Lists

10 Innovations That Built Ancient Rome — HISTORY Lists | Ancient History | Scoop.it
From aqueducts to battlefield surgery, explore 10 inventions that epitomize the innovative spirit of ancient Rome. (10 Innovations That Built Ancient Rome

The Western Roman Empire may have fallen more than 1,500 years ago, but...

Via Chris Tat
Gabriel Rodriguez's insight:

How is it possible that the people of ancient Rome had the capability to create such advanced inventions?

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Women in Ancient Rome - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Women in Ancient Rome - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Freeborn women in ancient Rome were citizens (cives) , but could not vote or hold political office. Because of their limited public role, women are named less frequently than men by Roman historians. But while Roman women held no direct political power, those from wealthy or powerful families could and did exert influence through private negotiations.

Women in Ancient Rome http://t.co/2yNIyJ0s...

Via Catherine Ingham
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Rescooped by Gabriel Rodriguez from Archaeology News
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Ancient Teeth Help Scientists Decode Plague - History

Ancient Teeth Help Scientists Decode Plague - History | Ancient History | Scoop.it
History Ancient Teeth Help Scientists Decode Plague History By using DNA extracted from the teeth of ancient victims, scientists determined that the strains of Yersinia pestis that caused the Plague of Justinian likely died out, and that the Black...

Via David Connolly
Gabriel Rodriguez's insight:

We live in a world so advanced we can look at teeth that are hundreds of years old and know there was a plague in that time period. That's something.

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Rescooped by Gabriel Rodriguez from Ancient History News
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Archaeological discoveries confirm early date of Buddha's life

Archaeological discoveries confirm early date of Buddha's life | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Archaeologists working in Nepal have uncovered evidence of a structure at the birthplace of the Buddha dating to the sixth century B.C.

Via Raymund Cruz
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Raymund Cruz's curator insight, January 22, 2014 4:09 PM

To determine the dates of the timber shrine and a previously unknown early brick structure above it, fragments of charcoal and grains of sand were tested using a combination of radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence techniques. 

Rescooped by Gabriel Rodriguez from Ancient History News
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Ancient Pharaoh Ramses III Was Assassinated

Ancient Pharaoh Ramses III Was Assassinated | Ancient History | Scoop.it
The mystery of an ancient Egyptian pharaoh's death may have been solved. Experts knew of an assassination and coup attempt on Ramses III, but never ascertained whether the attackers had succeeded,... Science News Summaries.

Via Raymund Cruz
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Raymund Cruz's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:26 AM

Egyptologists also examined a mummy buried with Ramses, concluding that it was probably his son Pentawere—the very son whose mother is thought to have orchestrated the coup, hoping to make Pentawere pharaoh.

Charlie Wittke's curator insight, January 28, 2014 4:03 PM

Rameses III was found with a throat wound which killed him. Conspiracy theorists claim that it was his wife and son who killed him.

Rescooped by Gabriel Rodriguez from Ancient Greece
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Greek Theatre - Ancient Greece

Greek Theatre - Ancient Greece | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Greek Theatre and its origin from Ancient Greece in the forms of Tragedy, Comedy and Satyr.

Via Barbara Falkinburg, Khai Tran
Gabriel Rodriguez's insight:

Amazing to see history is still present today.  Ancient Greece made theater and entertainment a part of culture and that culture, although a bit modified, continues today.

 

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Kristine Rapisura's curator insight, March 1, 2014 1:47 AM

How greek theaters started by honoring their gods. Such an amazing form of architecture. 

Kelsey Cherise Quates's curator insight, April 17, 2014 6:14 PM

It is interesting and wonderful that many people continue to carry the same principals and techniques as the Greeks. There music and acting gave birth to so many forms of genres over the centuries but didn't really start showing up till much later in human history.

Michael Goodson's curator insight, April 18, 2014 6:13 PM

The different types of plays that the Ancient Greeks performed in theaters.

Rescooped by Gabriel Rodriguez from Alexander the Great
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Macedonia : Alexander the Great conquers Paris « History Of ...

Macedonia : Alexander the Great conquers Paris « History Of ... | Ancient History | Scoop.it
http://alexandre-le-grand.louvre.fr/en/. Macedonia News : Videos from the exhibition. Alexander the Great. Με τον Μέγα Αλέξανδρο στο Λούβρο ΕΤ3 ~ Alexander the Great in Louvre Museum ET3. From the YouTube channel of ...

Via Panayiotis
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Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, February 28, 2014 7:10 PM

Alexander The Great is probably one of the most famous people on earth; his influence on ancient history is only rivaled by people like Genghis Khan, Hannibal, Sun Tzu, etc.  

Rescooped by Gabriel Rodriguez from Ancient History
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Incursion in the Buried History: the Plague and the Rats

Incursion in the Buried History: the Plague and the Rats | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Plague is an infectious disease and is caused by a bacterium called ‘’Yersinia Pestis’’. The main culprits of disease transmission to humans are rats (black rat, brown rat of the channel, Norwegian rat) because of fleas.

Via Michel Ortiz
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Michel Ortiz's curator insight, November 1, 2013 5:51 PM

I was never taught this partof history in any of my years of school. I feel like I learned the most by reading this article.

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Ancient hunter-gatherers also brought home the bacon  - NBC News.com

Ancient hunter-gatherers also brought home the bacon  - NBC News.com | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Ancient hunter-gatherers in Europe, whose meat intake was once limited to wild game, may have enjoyed bacon, ham, pork chops and other...
Gabriel Rodriguez's insight:

Ancient civilizations had good taste in food, too! Imagine traveling back in time and eating bacon with someone from an ancient civilization. 

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Rescooped by Gabriel Rodriguez from Ancient History News
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Headhunters' Trophy Skulls Uncovered From Ancient London

Headhunters' Trophy Skulls Uncovered From Ancient London | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Ancient gladiators, criminals, and war victims may have been beheaded, suggests ancient skulls discovered from Roman-era London.

Via Raymund Cruz
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Raymund Cruz's curator insight, January 16, 2014 2:19 PM

The Roman military were strongly associated with headhunting practices.Criminals might have been killed and then left for display after death.

Rescooped by Gabriel Rodriguez from mystery of the ancient history
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Bones from human sacrifice at Tenochtitlan ceremonial complex

Bones from human sacrifice at Tenochtitlan ceremonial complex | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Examining the osteological evidence on the bones of human sacrifices found within the ceremonial complex of the great Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan

Via Julie Sherva, andrea urbina
Gabriel Rodriguez's insight:

Remains of human sacrifices are found in Mexico city.  It is hard to imagine how the Aztec people would sacrificial ceremonies with thousands of people cheering for the deaths of other humans.  It's interesting to see how far violence goes back in history.

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Rebecca Mathis's curator insight, January 22, 2014 2:14 PM

I think that it's interesting that they actually sacrificed people to theur Gods and then ate them. I was also very surpised that they sacrificed children. It's cool to learn about how people once lived.

flor molina's curator insight, January 24, 2014 11:01 PM

The remains of humans were found in the great Aztec capital of Tenochtilan. It is said that these humans sacrificed their bodies because archaeologist found cuts on their bones. They also figure that they probably burned themselves alive as well. The remain aren't just from random humans, it is guessed to be the remains of children,warriors,slaves, etc...

andrea urbina's curator insight, January 25, 2014 12:42 AM

this is interesting how in mexico they would sacrafise people and they tended to hit them and give them great injuries. this might have been religios ceremonies or believes they might had.

Rescooped by Gabriel Rodriguez from Asociación Pensamiento y Cultura de la Antigüedad
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BBC - History - Ancient History in depth: From Warrior Women to Female Pharaohs: Careers for Women in Ancient Egypt

BBC - History - Ancient History in depth: From Warrior Women to Female Pharaohs: Careers for Women in Ancient Egypt | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Egyptian women enjoyed a greater freedom than we would normally associate with the ancient world (RT @Gsquare86: Ancient History in depth: From Warrior Women to Female Pharaohs: Careers for #Women in Ancient #Egypt http://t.co/W05OZITQ)...

Via APCA UAM
Gabriel Rodriguez's insight:

This article explores equality between the two sexes and how women were just as powerful as men.  They did hard labor, ruled kingdoms, and any other task we consider to be for males today.  Our society has regressed from ancient times in terms of equality.

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