Ancient History
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Charlemagne’s court library revisited

Charlemagne’s court library revisited | Ancient History | Scoop.it

The starting point of all modern discussion of Charlemagne’s court library is, as of so much else, a lapidary statement in Einhard’s Vita Karoli . The penultimate section of the Emperor’s testamentary breviarium , dated 811, with which the Life concludes records that: ‘he decreed that the books of which he had assembled a great collection in his library’ ( magnam in bibliotheca sua copiam congregavit ) were to be available for purchase ‘at the appropriate price’ ( iusto pretio ) by anyone who wanted them, and the proceeds distributed to the poor...


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The Hardships of My Life

The Hardships of My Life | Ancient History | Scoop.it

   I just got shipped back from the first crusade and it was chaotic. It's traumitizing to go through that with the Christians. Although, if I had died out on that battlefield I would be forgiven of my sins by God. This is because I am Muslim and was fighting for the the right people in the crusade. This crusade accomplished nothing for us Muslims because many Muslims died and still the government was unstable. The worst thing to think about is that we fought and fought, yet still we didn't get much out of it. The only thing that we got as Muslims is the satisfaction that we kept them safe. I think that crusades are pointless and have negative impacts on Muslims as a whole.


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Discovering China - The Song Dynasty

After the collapse of the Tang Dynasty, over 50 years of Chaos followed, until a military general named Zhao Kuangyin founded the Song Dynasty, reigning as e...

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Aaronee's curator insight, February 10, 2014 4:27 PM

The song started in 960 AD and lasted over 300 years but the song was spit in two by the North and the South. They used the song to invade other people.

Patrick Kwong's curator insight, February 13, 2014 6:31 PM

China's territory was much larger than its modern day country. This probably explained  why the North Song Dynasty was at constant war with the Jin. But apparently, over time, China lost its mass and its territory.

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The Agony of Chinese Foot Binding in Pictures

The Agony of Chinese Foot Binding in Pictures | Ancient History | Scoop.it
What price beauty? One of the most extreme – and painful – customs practiced in the name of aesthetics was the ancient art of Chinese foot binding.

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Cathars and Cathar Beliefs in the Languedoc

Cathars and Cathar Beliefs in the Languedoc | Ancient History | Scoop.it

Languedoc Cathars. Cathar beliefs. Cathari and heretics, Catharism and the Albigensian Crusade. The Role of the Roman Catholic Church: Innocent III and his holy wars (Crusades).
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Cathar Doctrine
Duality
The fight between two equals Good and Evil
As set down in St.John's Gospel
Good being the kingdom of the good lord
Evil being the material and time passing reality of the visible physical world.
Evil had imprisoned good inside men's bodies
Man enters the kingdom of God through his soul.
To achieve this, he had to "ascèse" detaching from the material world
The "ascèse" prepared him for baptism,
Salvation was found through "consolament"
The joining of soul and spirit
The Cathars only sacrement.
The holy book was the new testament
The prayer was the lords prayer.

They called each other Christians. Bons hommes. Good Men
Friends of Gods.
They were 40,000 Croyants (believers) with a 1000 priests (parfaits).

The croyants lived normal lives,
Except honoring the Parfaits, taking part in their ceremonies,
And sharing their ritual meal.
They could become parfaits after a three year apprenticeship.

The parfaits community was divided into houses run by an elder or prioress.
Professional and religious life was taught to encompass regular lifestyle.
The male and female priests shared their time between preaching and doing regular work.
The church imposed the priests to live on their labors.
The fruits of the parfaits labor and the croyants donation made the wealth of the Cathar Church.

The parfaits dressed in black.
Moved about, and lived in pairs, extolling the doctrines of their church, refusing secular laws.
The Cathar church had no rights over the population.
They did not believe in feudal heirachy.
They preached in the langue d'Oc.
Promoting feminism and equality for the serfs, the poor.
They were vegetarians.
Their way of life was accepted by the aristocracy, and became established in town and country.
Rome felt their lifestyle as a threat to both income and way of living
The Pope Innocent the Third in 1209 launched a crusade against them
He called in Simon de Montford to slaughter, and extinguish their power, their religion.


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The Sanctuary of Loreto in Le Marche

The Sanctuary of Loreto in Le Marche | Ancient History | Scoop.it

In discovery of the Santa Casa and its many artistic works

The splendid City of Loreto, tucked inside the countryside of the Marches Region, owes its fame to the sanctuary where the Santa Casa della Vergine Maria (Shrine of the Holy House of the Virgin Mary) is preserved and venerated. It is a holy place defined by Pope John Paul II as “the true Marian heart of Christianity.” The sanctuary has been one of the most important pilgrimage sites for the Catholic faith for centuries, having been visited by approximately 200 saints and beatified persons, as well as by numerous Popes.
According to ancient tradition, and today substantiated by historical and archaeological research, the Santa Casa is the house from Nazareth where the Virgin Mary was born, educated, and where she received the Annunciation.
The house was composed of one room in masonry, with three walls in stone placed so as to enclose a rock cavern.

This cavern is worshipped by pilgrims who flock to Nazareth, that is to the Basilica of the Annunciation, while the three stone walls, as legend has it, were brought to Italy (first passing through Illyria) by crusaders expelled from Palestine in 1291. The walls arrived in Loreto in 1294.
Not only, but documents and archaeological excavations have continued to reinforce the hypothesis that the walls of the Santa Casa were transported to Loreto by ship, an initiative undertaken by the Angeli Family, nobles who ruled over Epirus at the time.

Indeed, one document dating back to 1294 (recently discovered), testifies that Niceforo Angeli, despot of Epirus, in offering his daughter Ithamar’s hand in marriage to Philip of Taranto (son of the King of Naples, Charles II of Anjou), gave the Prince a dowry that included such treasures as the “holy stones taken from the Home of our Lady the Virgin Mother of God.”
In order to protect these humble stone walls, and to receive the ever-larger masses of pilgrims visiting the sacred relic, construction works on the magnificent Sanctuary of Loreto were begun in the mid-15th Century.

 

Discover the Artistic works of the Santa Casa


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The Retreat's curator insight, February 2, 2013 9:48 AM

Another great scoop from Mario about the magic Marche area. Great work Mario!

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Crusader Motives

Crusader Motives | Ancient History | Scoop.it
This essay stemmed from the reading I did around the First Crusade when getting ready to teach it at Birkbeck. Doing this reading allowed me to pin down something that had bothered me when I'd been...

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Wednesday Thursday Friday's curator insight, June 19, 2013 3:50 AM

Possibly one of the worst arguments representing the new trend in history, a return to conservative western narratives, preaching -quite unsuccessfully- but with an eloquence any lawyer would be jealous of that the Crusades need to be seen as a pilgrimage, the violence just happened....

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Meet Caesar, man of letters, says Stanford’s Christopher Krebs

Meet Caesar, man of letters, says Stanford’s Christopher Krebs | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Professor of classics revisits Julius Caesar’s time-honored work "The Gallic War," revealing that beneath the military garb prowled a man of supreme intellectual abilities.

 

Glorious general, cunning politician, ruler of the mighty Roman Empire: this is the Julius Caesar we have long known.

 

But this appears to be only half the story, according to Stanford Classics Professor Christopher Krebs. A specialist in ancient Roman literature, Krebs notes that, apart from his well-known military exploits, Caesar was a man of letters who saw eye to eye with the famed Roman orator Cicero; a prolific writer and skilled linguist; and commissioner of the Julian calendar.

 

It is this lesser-known Caesar – the literary virtuoso rather than the conqueror of Gaul – whom Krebs describes in a new project he calls "Caesar 2.0." His research involves reading Caesar's main surviving text, the Commentarii de Bello Gallico (also known as The Gallic War), in an entirely new way: as a piece of literary art and a product of its cultural context rather than as a straightforward military journal.


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Intact Etruscan tomb unearthed in Tarquinia

Intact Etruscan tomb unearthed in Tarquinia | Ancient History | Scoop.it

The skeletonized body of an Etruscan prince, possibly a relative to Tarquinius Priscus, the legendary fifth king of Rome from 616 to 579 B.C., has been brought to light in an extraordinary finding that promises to reveal new insights on one of the ancient world’s most fascinating cultures.
Found in Tarquinia, a hill town about 50 miles northwest of Rome, famous for its Etruscan art treasures, the 2,600 year old intact burial site came complete with a full array of precious grave goods.

“It’s a unique discovery, as it is extremely rare to find an inviolate Etruscan tomb of an upper-class individual. It opens up huge study opportunities on the Etruscans,” Alessandro Mandolesi, of the University of Turin, told Discovery News. Mandolesi is leading the excavation in collaboration with the Archaeological Superintendency of Southern Etruria. [...]

As the heavy stone slab was removed, Mandolesi and his team were left breathless. In the small vaulted chamber, the complete skeleton of an individual was resting on a stone bed on the left. A spear lay along the body, while fibulae, or brooches, on the chest indicated that the individual, a man, was probably once dressed with a mantle.
At his feet stood a large bronze basin and a dish with food remains, while the stone table on the right might have contained the incinerated remains of another individual.

Decorated with a red strip, the upper part of the wall featured, along with several nails, a small hanging vase, which might have contained some ointment. A number of grave goods, which included large Greek Corinthian vases and precious ornaments, lay on the floor. [...]


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Jihadists see Syria insurgency as just the beginning of a Middle East revolution

Jihadists see Syria insurgency as just the beginning of a Middle East revolution | Ancient History | Scoop.it

Abu Khaled, a 26-year-old Lebanon-born fighter, said the battlefield in Syria has expanded because of groups such as Isis, inspiring hope that the uprisings across the Middle East will give rise to a broader Islamic revolution. “We always said one of the main problems are the rulers, and now, see how one after the other is disappearing,” said Khaled, who refused to give his full name. “And it won’t stop until we get our aim.”

 

The formal titles adopted by both al-Qa’ida groups include the Arabic term for greater Syria — al-Sham — that radical Islamists use to link their movement to the ancient Islamic caliphate that ruled a vast swath of the Middle East, with Damascus as its capital. Its use, the jihadists say, evokes an image of a future Middle East with a single Islamic state, encompassing the territories of Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan and Israel.

 

It is the groups’ appeal to a greater jihad that explains why foreign volunteers continue streaming into Syria in numbers that surpass those seen during earlier conflicts in Afghanistan, Bosnia or Iraq, said Bruce Riedel, a former CIA officer and a Middle East adviser to four US administrations. “Syria has become the most important destination for aspiring jihadists ever, because it is the heart of the Muslim world on the border of Palestine,” says Mr Riedel, now a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. “For jihadis, it is the road to Jerusalem at last.”


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AnthonyAcosta/NoahMata's curator insight, November 5, 2014 1:45 PM

Area/Geography-

People are beginning to realize that they want to fight against everyone and protect the Middle East. Isis has had a huge influence on civilians. Many volunteers have showed up to help Isis protect the Middle East. Many joined to help protect the Muslim religion as well they will fight and die for the evil terrorists!

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Ancient Greek and Islamic Philosophy | Fordham, Oct 11-13, 2013

Ancient Greek and Islamic Philosophy | Fordham, Oct 11-13, 2013 | Ancient History | Scoop.it
The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy (SAGP) and the Society for the Study of Islamic Philosophy and Science (SSIPS) will hold their Annual Joint Meeting on October 11-13 this year at Fordham Un...

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A Real-Life Indiana Jones Who Converted To Islam And Discovered An Ancient City

A Real-Life Indiana Jones Who Converted To Islam And Discovered An Ancient City | Ancient History | Scoop.it
A Real-Life Indiana Jones Who Converted To Islam And Discovered An Ancient City @Worldcrunch Worldcrunch - Great stories from the world's best news sources

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David Connolly's comment, January 28, 2013 4:37 AM
petra, archaeology, jordan,
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Life in Rome: Baths of Caracalla

Trinity Jackman, Classical Archaeologist, describes the massive bath and swim facilities of Ancient Rome. To learn more about the ancient empires of Rome, Nu...

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Charlemagne Biography - life, childhood, parents, death, school, son, information, born, time, achievements

Charlemagne Biography - life, childhood, parents, death, school, son, information, born, time, achievements | Ancient History | Scoop.it

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Advancements in Learning

Advancements in Learning | Ancient History | Scoop.it

    Many major advancements were made in learning. Such as, universities. The first universities had been terrible they were only rented rooms with hardwood benches. There were also times that you had to wake up and switch class, like a complete schedule. Although, the main problem was that the universities only taught certain subjects. So once you had finished a subject at one university you'll have to go to another in order to learn the next subject. Once time started progressing most things from before had stayed the same, but more people had started learning because Muslim Spain, Jewish, and Christian scholars translated much of Aristotles texts as well as other Greek thinkers. There was controversy between the Church and Aristotles texts though. Which is how scholatism played a huge role in universities. In greater time I believe that the universities will develop into many buildings that are owned by their founders, but also include all subjects necessary for certain expertise. This advancement in learning will be better for people than all others. 


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Chinese Foot Binding in Pictures

Chinese Foot Binding in Pictures | Ancient History | Scoop.it

Women have done many things for beauty throughout the course of history – from indifferently using arsenic or lead-based cosmetics, to ear and other body piercings, to yet more extreme forms of body modification. One of the most agonizingly painful of such practices is the Chinese custom of foot binding, where the feet of women – typically young girls – were broken and bound until they were able to fit inside a tiny shoe.

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The Peculiar History of Foot Binding in China

The Peculiar History of Foot Binding in China | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Wikimedia Commons For around ten centuries, successive generations of Chinese women endured a practice when, as children, their feet were systematically broken and shaped in such a way that they resembled hooves.

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THE SECOND CRUSADE - JIHAD AGAINST THE CRUSADER STA

Zecharia Sitchin (July 11, 1920 -- October 9, 2010) was an Azerbaijani-born American author of books promoting an explanation for human origins involving anc...

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The Byzantine Background to the First Crusade

The Byzantine Background to the First Crusade | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Just over nine hundred years ago, Pope Urban II closed a provincial church council at Clermont Ferrand with a rousing call to arms that launched the First Crusade.

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Ancient tunnels in Rome, mithraic temple reopen to the public ~ Roman News and Archeology

Ancient tunnels in Rome, mithraic temple reopen to the public ~ Roman News and Archeology | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Roman heritage news excavations digs history Roman Empire Ancient Roma Archeology Julius Caesar histoire Rome antique fouilles archéologiques empire romain Jules Cesar archeologie...

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Cindy Garcia's curator insight, November 23, 2013 6:06 AM

In this very interesting article theystate that in Rome today that are reopening the old temples to the people and the tunnels.

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Spanish researchers find the exact spot where Julius Caesar was stabbed

Spanish researchers find the exact spot where Julius Caesar was stabbed | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Several ancient Roman texts describe the assassination of Julius Caesar in Rome, at the Curia of Pompey in 44 BC, which was the result of a plot among a group of senators to eliminate the General.

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Le Marche | Before The Romans

Le Marche | Before The Romans | Ancient History | Scoop.it

There's a legend that tells of the time - before 300 BC - when the Picentini people, nomadic shepherds, left the country of the Sabines and travelled north to settle in the country they would call Picenum. The legend has it that they were guided by a woodpecker to the wedge of land between two rivers on which they founded a city - today known as Ascoli Piceno. The Latin word "woodpecker" was "picus" -- and thus the name.
Who were these people?
Before the Romanisation of the peninsular, Italy was populated by many different tribes -- those most remembered include the Etruscans (in modern-day Tuscany), the war-like Sabines, a variety of Greek colonies, and the Picenes.
Perhaps the most obvious reminder of the Picenes today is the second city of the province of Le Marche, which is called Ascoli Piceno. In Ascoli Piceno, in addition to some lovely piazzas, lots of travertine marble, a big duomo and plenty of anisette liqueur, there is a Museo Archeologico with a small but well-curated display of finds from graves and diggings from Picene times.
My 'Rough Guide To Italy' guide book summarises the Piceni tribes:
...the relics of their civilisation suggest that they were a pretty emotional and impetuous lot: writing curses on missiles, gauging grief by measuring the volume of tears, a losing a critical battle against the Romans when they interpreted an earthquake as a sign of divine wrath and abandoned the fight...


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Ancient Islamic architects created perfect quasicrystals

Ancient Islamic architects created perfect quasicrystals | Ancient History | Scoop.it
Patterns made with nothing more than a compass and a straight edge...

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Islam The Untold Story

Historian Tom Holland explores how a new religion - Islam - emerged from the seedbed of the ancient world, and asks what we really know for certain about the...

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◄ Colosseum, Rome [HD] ►

Colosseum - HD footage, information and facts on the icon of ancient Rome; the Colosseum. The Colosseum was the Roman Empire's most impressive building. The ...

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