Ancient Greece
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The Evolution Of Dystopian Literature In 9 Books - Huffington Post

The Evolution Of Dystopian Literature In 9 Books - Huffington Post | Ancient Greece | Scoop.it
Huffington Post

The Evolution Of Dystopian Literature In 9 Books

 

The meaning of the word dystopia has changed since British MP John Stuart Mill first used it in 1868. Mill - who was also the first person in the history of Parliament, believe it or not, to advocate suffrage for women - coined the term to criticize the government's policy in Ireland: "It is, perhaps, too complimentary to call them Utopians, they ought rather to be called dys-topians, or caco-topians. What is commonly called Utopian is something too good to be practicable; but what they appear to favor is too bad to be practicable." Nowadays, we associate the word with any work of fiction that depicts a "bad place," typically set in the near future. Here's my roundup of books that help track the evolution of the "bad place" in literature, from Tudor times to 2013.


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Mary Daniels Brown's curator insight, October 17, 2013 6:11 PM

An interesting list. I'm sure we can all think of others we'd add, but this limited list gets the job done quite well.

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Amazons, Amazónes

Amazons, Amazónes | Ancient Greece | Scoop.it

 

The Amazons are a nation of women dwelling near the river Thermodon in Greek folklore... Other historiographers place them in Asia Minor,or more often Ancient Libyē.

 

They are, as a race, regarded as children of Ares and Harmonia.

 

The Amazons, described in the Iliad as "antianeirai", meaning: those who go to war like men, were about the Thermodon river were in their full vigour a little before the Trojan war...

 

The name Amazon is believed to descend from the word amazoi which in Greek means "breast less". They cultivated the manly virtues and pinched off the right breasts of all females so that they might not be hindered by them in throwing the javelin.

 

But they kept the left breasts so that they might suckle, as they gave birth to children through normal intercourse with the other gender...

 

Historically, Amazons were portrayed as beautiful women in Amazonomachies, which was an artform showing battles between the Amazons and Greeks.

 

Normally seen on horseback, the Amazons wore armor made of animal skins and carried either a bow or spear.

 

An Amazon warrior possessed the strength of a man and was as savage as a wild animal, but she was especially dangerous because she had reason and cunning.

 

Amazons were trained to use all weapons and especially in single combat. They were honorable, courageous, brave and represented rebellion against sexism.

 

The legend tells of the Amazons invading Attica to take back their queen, and on reaching Athens a great battle took place, but the Athenians were glorious.

 

This scene has been depicted in art by the Greeks in many forms, but probably the most famous are the architectural marble carvings from the Parthenon sculpture (Amazonomachy).

 

More:

http://bit.ly/TkzzEq

http://bit.ly/NULdjV

http://bit.ly/ZoABNC

http://bit.ly/Mkr0lJ

http://bit.ly/115acWZ

http://bit.ly/28zRRy

http://bit.ly/115akFZ

http://bit.ly/61rJFX

http://bit.ly/KMIr0r

http://bit.ly/16UQGzX

 

See Ares:

http://sco.lt/5uoa6z

 

Post Image: http://bit.ly/Ztfp8a

 


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Neuroscience gets behind the mask of Greek theatre

Neuroscience gets behind the mask of Greek theatre | Ancient Greece | Scoop.it

Over 2000 years may have elapsed since masked Greek tragedies had their heyday on stage in Athens, but some of the most modern neuroscience may be able to give classicists a better understanding of how the ancients watched and thought about those plays that today exist only on paper.

 

Peter Meineck leads a double life, as a classicist at New York University and a theatre director and founder of the Aquila Theatre in New York. His interest and involvement in live theatre led him to wonder if he could somehow find a window into the minds of the ancient Greeks who watched plays like Antigone and the Oresteia unfold live on stage rather than the page.

 

Although the text of a play is undoubtedly important, Meineck says, classicists tend to rely too heavily on the words as first and last authority. At a talk at Stanford University in California last week, Meineck discussed his radical shift away from the text of ancient plays towards understanding the importance of masks and movements by teaming his theatrical knowledge with cognitive neuroscience.


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Theatre Transformations's curator insight, May 17, 4:12 AM
Greek theatre masks
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Aeschylus : Education - TheQuotes.Net – Motivational Quotes

Aeschylus : Education - TheQuotes.Net – Motivational Quotes | Ancient Greece | Scoop.it

I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning to sail my ship.


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Graeae, Graiae, Graiai

Graeae, Graiae, Graiai | Ancient Greece | Scoop.it

The three 'old women' or 'gray ones' from Greek folklore.

 

They are the daughters of Phorcys and Ceto, sisters and guardians of the Gorgons.

 

They were gray-haired from birth and have only one eye and one tooth, which they share among them...

 

The sisters formed the chorus of a play entitled the Phorcydes by Aeschylus, part of the dramatist's trilogy on the life of Perseus...

 

Extra:

http://www.theoi.com/Pontios/Graiai.html

http://bit.ly/I30z1x

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graeae

 

Post Image: http://bit.ly/HQUBSa


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Deus in Machina | The Revealer

Deus in Machina | The Revealer | Ancient Greece | Scoop.it
In ancient Greek tragedy it was not uncommon to resolve a particular dramatic crisis with the sudden intervention of a god, a strategy with which the playwright Euripides had a particular affinity. At the appointed moment during ...

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Greek Mythology: God and Goddesses | The Chronicle Watch

Greek Mythology: God and Goddesses | The Chronicle Watch | Ancient Greece | Scoop.it
Published on Feb 1, 2013. Greek Mythology is the body of myths and teachings that belong to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world, and the origins and significance of their own cult ...

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Cassandra Folkerth's curator insight, October 7, 2013 2:42 PM

It's so cool how we've been able to learn about the gods and goddesses  of different cultures and old societies. 

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The Archaeology and Geology of Ancient Greece

Production: SCAD Media, LLC http://www.scad-media.com HSP Fall 2012 The growth and development of many well-known ancient Greek sites can be more fully under...

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5 things we learned from Greek Mythology | kill adjectives

5 things we learned from Greek Mythology | kill adjectives | Ancient Greece | Scoop.it
Ever since I was young, I've been fascinated with Greek Mythology. I've always enjoyed how it was one of the first true methods of story telling. It developed into a teaching tool, and in later mythology it became a source of ...

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Geneticists Try to Figure Out When the Illiad Was Published

Geneticists Try to Figure Out When the Illiad Was Published | Ancient Greece | Scoop.it
When was The Iliad actually written? To answer that question, you might turn to a historian or a literary scholar. But geneticists wanted a crack at it, too

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, March 1, 2013 12:58 PM

I hesitate to begin with a question that may reveal more about my own ignorance than anything else.

 

Having for so long been a story passed down through generations strictly in an oral tradition, I can't imagine that there weren't many, versions of the story being told, all more or less similar at the core, but ranging in specific vocabulary used; sort of like what used to happen when we played the game called telephone. One listener, might remember the story fairly well, but memory might cause a blip or two when that listener retold the story. When the second listener retold the story more blips... and so on. And two listeners in that "first audience" might tell two slightly different blipped versions to four listeners each of whom might have told four different audiences four different blipped versions.

 

Recognizing that the original storytellers were far more attentive than 8 year old boys nervous about whispering into the ears of 8 year old girls, I'll assume that the source materials used in this intriguing story are "relatively" stable versions of the words that found their way into the earliest published versions of the story.

 

I'm actually more interested in the fact that those with non-literary educational backgrounds are bringing their talents to the study of literature. In previous scoops I've appreciated the work being done in neuroscience related to tracking brain functions when reading literature.

 

The vocabulary lesson described in this article as it was used by geneticists attempting to determine a possible date of the publication of the Illiad might be more interesting to a significant percentage of our students than merely looking at vocabulary as a study of prefixes, roots, and suffixes.

 

Anyone who has tried to maintain an interest in older literature in spite of its antiquated vocabulary knows that constant interruptions of the engaging momentum of the suspension of disbelief is not always as successful as it is annoying to many students. 

 

Great literature does not stand alone in the real world. It is influenced and reflects history, psychology, culture, cartography, philosophy, sociology, politics, marketing, intellectual perception,... all sorts of elements beyond the siloed English Department. 

 

As those of us who focus upon the value of literature in the 21st century valiantly come to its defense, it is essential that we not fight that good fight alone. It is too easy to dismiss literature educators as being biased in times when "practical" is a trump card in budget discussions among colleagues whose understanding of the practical impacts of the difficult to measure outcomes of literary reading is less well informed. 

 

To be able to reference more informed views of allies coming to the defense of literary reading from beyond the English department; from the sciences and the business departments ((see: This is Your Brain on Jane Austin, The Neuroscience of Your Brain on Fiction, and "If You Want to Lead, Read") is an invaluable asset to offset assumptions of bias when we tilt at the budgetary windmills alone.

 

And, in gratitude, we ought to also be careful in our own contributions to the conversations when they turn to the value of supporting other curricular areas that we may find ourselves less well informed about. 

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 

 

Aaronee's curator insight, February 18, 2014 6:57 PM

They traced the words on the lliad like you would do genes. They used a database of concepts and words. the word database is named Swadesh word list, and its has about 200 words that exist in everyone language and culture, like water and dog.

 

Gabriel Rodriguez's curator insight, February 21, 2014 11:09 PM

Very different approach on trying to date something back to it's original creation.  Can genetics be used to date back other historical treasure's also?

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Homer’s Iliad Retold

Homer’s Iliad Retold | Ancient Greece | Scoop.it

Stephen Mitchell, poet and translator. His latest translation is of “The Iliad.” You can find an excerpt here.

Stephen Mitchell, poet and translator. His latest translation is of “The Iliad.” You can find an excerpt here....


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The Oresteia and Greek Mythology with Will Freiert - Posted on ...

The Oresteia and Greek Mythology with Will Freiert - Posted on ... | Ancient Greece | Scoop.it
The Oresteia is a trilogy among Greek tragedies. The three plays, entitled Agamemnon, Libation Bearers, and Eumenides, are centered around the themes of justice and revenge. In Agamemnon, Queen Clytemnestra seeks to ...

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Aeschylus Biography - life, family, children, history, wife, young, information, born

Aeschylus Biography - life, family, children, history, wife, young, information, born | Ancient Greece | Scoop.it

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Sophocles - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sophocles - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Ancient Greece | Scoop.it

Sophocles (497 BC, 496 BC, or 495 BC – 406 BC) was an Ancient Greek writer who wrote 123 plays, according to the Suda. Only 7 of histragedies have survived complete. Sophocles was the second of the three greatest Ancient Greek writers of tragedies, the others wereAeschylus and Euripides.

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Euripides Biography - life, family, children, son, information, born, time

Euripides Biography - life, family, children, son, information, born, time | Ancient Greece | Scoop.it

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BBC Two - Who Were the Greeks?

BBC Two - Who Were the Greeks? | Ancient Greece | Scoop.it
Dr Michael Scott uncovers the strange, alien world of the ancient Greeks

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Greek Mythology: God and Goddesses - History Documentary

In the ancient Greek religion, Zeus (Ancient Greek: Ζεύς, Zeús; Modern Greek: Δίας, Días) is the "Father of Gods and men" (πατὴρ ἀνδρῶν τε θεῶν τε, patḕr and...

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An Introduction to Greek Theatre

This film explores the defining aspects of Greek Theatre. The theatre of Ancient Greece flourished between 550 BC and 220 BC. A festival honouring the god Di...

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