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Archaeologists find Ming Dynasty mummy in China - Telegraph

Archaeologists find Ming Dynasty mummy in China - Telegraph | ancient greece | Scoop.it
Archaeologists find 700-year-old mummified Ming Dynasty woman in China.

Via David Connolly, Renn Isobe
Casandra Pricyla Alarcon's insight:

"I found this really interesting because the mummy looks so well put together. They did a really good job on preserving the mummy, and the ring was just beautiful. They must of made their jewelry from really good material because it didn't seem to have any rust marks on it. Even though the mummy was a bit flooded in water due to where it was buried they still managed to get it out in one piece." 

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Aaronee's curator insight, February 10, 2014 4:23 PM

They say they found a mummy of a women in china which she happens to be 700 years old.

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Archaeologists find Ming Dynasty mummy in China - Telegraph

Archaeologists find Ming Dynasty mummy in China - Telegraph | ancient greece | Scoop.it
Archaeologists find 700-year-old mummified Ming Dynasty woman in China.

Via David Connolly, Renn Isobe
Casandra Pricyla Alarcon's insight:

"I found this really interesting because the mummy looks so well put together. They did a really good job on preserving the mummy, and the ring was just beautiful. They must of made their jewelry from really good material because it didn't seem to have any rust marks on it. Even though the mummy was a bit flooded in water due to where it was buried they still managed to get it out in one piece." 

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Aaronee's curator insight, February 10, 2014 4:23 PM

They say they found a mummy of a women in china which she happens to be 700 years old.

Rescooped by Casandra Pricyla Alarcon from Ancient Art
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greece-attica-athens-acropolis-listed-as-world-heritage-by-unesco-2 - Greek Architecture - Ancient Greece Pictures - HISTORY.com

greece-attica-athens-acropolis-listed-as-world-heritage-by-unesco-2 - Greek Architecture - Ancient Greece Pictures - HISTORY.com | ancient greece | Scoop.it
Rising 500 feet above sea level, the Acropolis in Athens showcases some of the finest examples of Greek architecture.

Via Cecilia Urbina
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Ancient Greece - Art and Architecture, Sculpture, Pottery and Greek Temples

Ancient Greece - Art and Architecture, Sculpture, Pottery and Greek Temples | ancient greece | Scoop.it
Information on Ancient Greek Art & Architecture...

Via Mrs. Mullins, dominic jewell, Catherine Ingham
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Cindy Garcia's curator insight, October 19, 2013 6:16 AM

In this article, it is mention that in Ancient Greece, the Greek life was ruled by Religion. The temples were created big and beautiful places in Greece because of their strong religion. Architecture in Ancient Greece was magnificent. Greek had three types of architectural systems; Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian. They each required different structures and for different use. ("Acropolis." Ancient Greece. University Press Inc, n.d. 2013-2012)

Khai Tran's curator insight, January 27, 2014 4:23 PM

Built many beautiful architectures and some of the structures we build today is similar or ideas of what was built back then

Kristine Rapisura's curator insight, February 1, 2014 2:35 AM

Ancient Greece is known for the intricate architecture within their cities. Many will be found on greek temples for their gods and godesses. 

Rescooped by Casandra Pricyla Alarcon from Greek Mythology
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Eos, Êôs

Eos, Êôs | ancient greece | Scoop.it

 

Eos is the Greek personification of the Dawn, the daughter of the Titans Hyperion and Theia and the sister of Helios (Sun) and Selene (Moon)...

 

At the close of each night, rosy-fingered, saffron-robed Eos rises from her couch in the east and mounts her chariot drawn by the horses Lampus and Phaethon.

 

Her duty is to ride to Mount Olympus and announce the approach of her brother Helios...

 

When Helios appears Eos becomes Hemera (Day) and she journeys along with him on his travels until, now transformed into Hespera (Dusk), she announces their safe arrival on the western shores of the great Ocean....

 

Eos had an unquenchable desire for handsome young men, some say as the result of a curse laid upon her by the goddess Aphrodite.

 

Her lovers included Orion, Phaethon, Kephalos and Tithonos, three of which she ravished away to distant lands.

 

The Trojan prince Tithonos became her official consort. When the goddess petitioned Zeus for his immortality, she neglected also to request eternal youth.

 

In time he shrivelled up by old age and transformed into a grasshopper.

 

Eos was closely identified with Hemera, the primordial goddess of day.

 

In some mytlegends--such as the tales of Orion and Kephalos--Eos stood virtually as a non-virginal substitute for Artemis...

http://bit.ly/hHmXFT

 

 

From The Iliad:

 

Now when Dawn in robe of saffron was hastening from the streams of Oceanus, to bring light to mortals and immortals, Thetis reached the ships with the armor that the god had given her.—Iliad xix.1

 

But soon as early Dawn appeared, the rosy-fingered, then gathered the folk about the pyre of glorious Hector.

—Iliad xxiv.776

 

More:

http://bit.ly/j0ckHT

http://bit.ly/18jP7wk

http://bit.ly/11UUseg

http://bit.ly/12EBGX6

http://bit.ly/19gabN

http://bit.ly/14XknQH

http://bit.ly/12v2SUH

http://bit.ly/btt3gC

http://bit.ly/bDNGPu

http://bit.ly/15DWrjT

http://bit.ly/18mhrle

http://bit.ly/119dzKJ

 

See Helios:

http://bit.ly/PrcgE1

 

See Selene:

http://sco.lt/7rTT2P

 

Post Image: http://bit.ly/17jz9RO

 


Via Mhd.Shadi Khudr, Greek-Gods.info
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Graeae, Graiae, Graiai

Graeae, Graiae, Graiai | ancient greece | Scoop.it

The three 'old women' or 'gray ones' from Greek folklore.

 

They are the daughters of Phorcys and Ceto, sisters and guardians of the Gorgons.

 

They were gray-haired from birth and have only one eye and one tooth, which they share among them...

 

The sisters formed the chorus of a play entitled the Phorcydes by Aeschylus, part of the dramatist's trilogy on the life of Perseus...

 

Extra:

http://www.theoi.com/Pontios/Graiai.html

http://bit.ly/I30z1x

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graeae

 

Post Image: http://bit.ly/HQUBSa


Via Mhd.Shadi Khudr, Tom Randall
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Geneticists Try to Figure Out When the Illiad Was Published

Geneticists Try to Figure Out When the Illiad Was Published | ancient greece | Scoop.it
When was The Iliad actually written? To answer that question, you might turn to a historian or a literary scholar. But geneticists wanted a crack at it, too

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List, Tom Randall
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, March 1, 2013 12:58 PM

I hesitate to begin with a question that may reveal more about my own ignorance than anything else.

 

Having for so long been a story passed down through generations strictly in an oral tradition, I can't imagine that there weren't many, versions of the story being told, all more or less similar at the core, but ranging in specific vocabulary used; sort of like what used to happen when we played the game called telephone. One listener, might remember the story fairly well, but memory might cause a blip or two when that listener retold the story. When the second listener retold the story more blips... and so on. And two listeners in that "first audience" might tell two slightly different blipped versions to four listeners each of whom might have told four different audiences four different blipped versions.

 

Recognizing that the original storytellers were far more attentive than 8 year old boys nervous about whispering into the ears of 8 year old girls, I'll assume that the source materials used in this intriguing story are "relatively" stable versions of the words that found their way into the earliest published versions of the story.

 

I'm actually more interested in the fact that those with non-literary educational backgrounds are bringing their talents to the study of literature. In previous scoops I've appreciated the work being done in neuroscience related to tracking brain functions when reading literature.

 

The vocabulary lesson described in this article as it was used by geneticists attempting to determine a possible date of the publication of the Illiad might be more interesting to a significant percentage of our students than merely looking at vocabulary as a study of prefixes, roots, and suffixes.

 

Anyone who has tried to maintain an interest in older literature in spite of its antiquated vocabulary knows that constant interruptions of the engaging momentum of the suspension of disbelief is not always as successful as it is annoying to many students. 

 

Great literature does not stand alone in the real world. It is influenced and reflects history, psychology, culture, cartography, philosophy, sociology, politics, marketing, intellectual perception,... all sorts of elements beyond the siloed English Department. 

 

As those of us who focus upon the value of literature in the 21st century valiantly come to its defense, it is essential that we not fight that good fight alone. It is too easy to dismiss literature educators as being biased in times when "practical" is a trump card in budget discussions among colleagues whose understanding of the practical impacts of the difficult to measure outcomes of literary reading is less well informed. 

 

To be able to reference more informed views of allies coming to the defense of literary reading from beyond the English department; from the sciences and the business departments ((see: This is Your Brain on Jane Austin, The Neuroscience of Your Brain on Fiction, and "If You Want to Lead, Read") is an invaluable asset to offset assumptions of bias when we tilt at the budgetary windmills alone.

 

And, in gratitude, we ought to also be careful in our own contributions to the conversations when they turn to the value of supporting other curricular areas that we may find ourselves less well informed about. 

 

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 

 

Aaronee's curator insight, February 18, 2014 6:57 PM

They traced the words on the lliad like you would do genes. They used a database of concepts and words. the word database is named Swadesh word list, and its has about 200 words that exist in everyone language and culture, like water and dog.

 

Gabriel Rodriguez's curator insight, February 21, 2014 11:09 PM

Very different approach on trying to date something back to it's original creation.  Can genetics be used to date back other historical treasure's also?

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Ancient China in Pictures

Ancient China in Pictures | ancient greece | Scoop.it
Religions in ancient China.

Via Tania Gammage, Elizabeth Otis
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Patrick Kwong's curator insight, February 21, 2014 2:16 PM

These pictures of ancient China tell us a lot about their practices such as their trade, mathematics, and hierarchy of authority. But what amazes me is how historians can almost accurately order these chains of events shown in these paintings.

Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, February 21, 2014 7:45 PM

I have always enjoyed art and Chinese art , like Japanese and Korean is very simple and intricate in detail. Like most other cultures though the art is not very indicative of daily life.

Elizabeth Otis's curator insight, February 21, 2014 8:24 PM

Some of the information that they have on the religions of ancient china is very interesting. 

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Greek architecture: Archaic to early classical, architectural orders

This is the first of three lectures on Greek architecture . . . and yes, alas, I will be hitting you with a LOT of vocabulary.

Via Ruby Carat
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25 Influential Pieces Of Ancient Greek Architecture

25 Influential Pieces Of Ancient Greek Architecture | ancient greece | Scoop.it
The ancient Greeks definitely left quite a legacy in the world today. Here are 25 influential pieces of ancient Greek architecture.

Via ang
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Greek-Gods.Info- Greek Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Greece

Greek-Gods.Info- Greek Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Greece | ancient greece | Scoop.it
Greek gods, goddesses and heroes of Ancient Greece. Myths of Greek gods, picture galleries and free mythology games. Greek names and their meanings

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Greek Mythology: God and Goddesses - History Documentary

In the ancient Greek religion, Zeus (Ancient Greek: Ζεύς, Zeús; Modern Greek: Δίας, Días) is the "Father of Gods and men" (πατὴρ ἀνδρῶν τε θεῶν τε, patḕr and...

Via Catherine Ingham, Tom Randall
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