Archaeology Findings
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The Secrets of Ancient Rome’s Buildings

The Secrets of Ancient Rome’s Buildings | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
What is it about Roman concrete that keeps the Pantheon and the Colosseum still standing? (Why are the Pantheon and the Colosseum still standing?

Via Rebeca BM, Olivia Jane
claudia patino's insight:

I have wondered why some buildings have survived for hundreds of years. Apparently the extra ingredient was volcanic ash to make concrete more durable. While today's concrete does not contain that ingredient, I am impresses with this idea.

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Flor Beltran's curator insight, January 17, 2014 10:32 PM

It's interestng to find out that volcanic ash was a secret weapon the Roman used to create strong city buildings, eventhough it might a bit doubtful now. Howeve, whatever helped preserve their great structures is wonderful becasue it allowed us in the 21 century to still experience these geat beautiful structures.

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Mike Anderson's Ancient History Blog: Christianity and the Roman Empire - Part I

Mike Anderson's Ancient History Blog: Christianity and the Roman Empire - Part I | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
history of ancient Rome and Greece including political systems and culture (Mike Anderson's Ancient History Blog: Christianity and the Roman ...)...

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Ancient Greece - Culture and Society in the Ancient Greek World

Information on ancient Greek Culture and society.

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Toxic Wine Might Have Killed Alexander the Great - Discovery News

Toxic Wine Might Have Killed Alexander the Great - Discovery News | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
Toxic Wine Might Have Killed Alexander the Great
Discovery News
The overlord of one of the largest empires in the ancient world, stretching from Greece to India and Egypt, was taken to bed with severe stomach pain and fever.

Via David Walp
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Elizabeth Otis's curator insight, January 17, 2014 6:47 PM

It is always interesting to see new ideas on how things happend in history. It is possible that he was killed though the use of toxic wine. However, I liked how the article ended on the not that we will nrver realy know. 

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Were the ancient Greeks and Romans colour blind? - ABC Online

Were the ancient Greeks and Romans colour blind? - ABC Online | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
Were the ancient Greeks and Romans colour blind?

Via Kate Smith, killer
claudia patino's insight:

I have to disagree with Bradley about the ancient Greeks being color blind. While it may be true that Homer only described blacks and whites, perhaps pinks, purples, and reds were not to be talked about. It is a possibility because some of the laws in the ancient world are ridicules to me. Like from the last article I just wrote my insight. Greeks were forbidden to eat the healthy food, and why, for no good reason.

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What Didn't Ancient Greeks Eat and Were So Clever? - Greek Reporter

What Didn't Ancient Greeks Eat and Were So Clever? - Greek Reporter | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
What Didn't Ancient Greeks Eat and Were So Clever?
Greek Reporter
Modern science has repeatedly studied ancient writings to find more about the diet of ancient Greeks and to answer a seemingly simple question: Why were ancient Greeks so clever?

Via Jeanette Vetree Symonds
claudia patino's insight:

Ancient Greeks would not consume meat and cultivating vegetables was common. After watching the documentary Forks Over Knifes I know that eating meat speeds up cancer cells in the body to grow. So the Greeks were so healthy by consuming all the healthy foods. They were clever by eating zea and hippophaes, both health foods.

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Kristine Rapisura's curator insight, February 14, 2014 10:49 PM

How were the greeks so healthy? They believed a healthy body means a healthy mind. They didn't know what was wheat/ bread that consisted of gluten. Gluten makes the brain sleepy and tired to function throughout the day. What they had instead was "Zea, a cereal rich in magnesium" making the brain more alert. 

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Ancient Greece - History, mythology, art, war, culture, society, and architecture.

Information Resource on Ancient Greece, including: history, mythology, art and architecture, olympics, wars, culture and society, playwrights, philosophers, historians, geography and essays etc...


Via Bridget Hoban
claudia patino's insight:

It seems that invasions and fighting for land happened often in the ancient world. We must be thankful that items that archeologist have found have  survived the tough changes of the environment to tell stories about the past.

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Kristine Rapisura's curator insight, February 1, 2014 2:40 AM

A quick interactive page that can help me in the future. It has information about their society, and how they were goven. Also how they created athletic sports with Olympics. 

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The Archaeology News Network: Inca ruins discovered in Nazca, Peru

The Archaeology News Network: Inca ruins discovered in Nazca, Peru | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
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The Archaeology News Network: Peru to open Uyo Uyo archaeological site to tourists

The Archaeology News Network: Peru to open Uyo Uyo archaeological site to tourists | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it

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John Ward's curator insight, December 31, 2013 12:34 AM

The Uyo Uyo archaeological site (not to be confused with the disputed phallic ruins at Inca Uyo near Puno or the Nigerian city of Uyo) is located in the Valle del Colca. According to Andina, the site is a pre-Inca citadel that contains houses, a plaza, and an observatory. 

Read more at: http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2013/11/peru-to-open-uyo-uyo-archaeological.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheArchaeologyNewsNetwork+%28The+Archaeology+News+Network%29#.UsJXNtIW18E
Read more at: http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/

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Evidence For Ancient Peruvian Brain Surgeons Unearthed - Archaeology Magazine

Evidence For Ancient Peruvian Brain Surgeons Unearthed - Archaeology Magazine | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
Evidence For Ancient Peruvian Brain Surgeons Unearthed http://t.co/uoAsY9b8vy #archaeology

Via Patricia Smaniotto
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Rescooped by claudia patino from Cultural Worldviews
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'Secret' Labyrinth of Roman Tunnels Mapped

'Secret' Labyrinth of Roman Tunnels Mapped | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
Ancient quarries under Rome threaten modern buildings and streets with collapse, leading geologists to go underground to map the passageways.

Via ramblejamble
claudia patino's insight:

Having underground tunnels in rome built by our ancestors is impressive. These tunnels had many functions, seltzer, protection, and water systems. Even more impresses that they are still in existence since many heavy buildings are built above the tunnels. Luckily maps are being drawn to know if a building sits on top of a tunnel.

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The Secrets of Ancient Rome’s Buildings

The Secrets of Ancient Rome’s Buildings | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
What is it about Roman concrete that keeps the Pantheon and the Colosseum still standing? (Why are the Pantheon and the Colosseum still standing?

Via Rebeca BM, Olivia Jane
claudia patino's insight:

I have wondered why some buildings have survived for hundreds of years. Apparently the extra ingredient was volcanic ash to make concrete more durable. While today's concrete does not contain that ingredient, I am impresses with this idea.

more...
Flor Beltran's curator insight, January 17, 2014 10:32 PM

It's interestng to find out that volcanic ash was a secret weapon the Roman used to create strong city buildings, eventhough it might a bit doubtful now. Howeve, whatever helped preserve their great structures is wonderful becasue it allowed us in the 21 century to still experience these geat beautiful structures.

Rescooped by claudia patino from Archaeology News
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5000 year old Temple of Fire discovered at El Paraiso in Peru : Past Horizons Archaeology

5000 year old Temple of Fire discovered at El Paraiso in Peru : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it

According to reports coming out of Peru, detailed in a report from the AFP, archaeologists have unearthed a previously undiscovered temple at the famous El Paraiso site, located not far from Lima, the capital city.


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Rescooped by claudia patino from HeritageDaily Archaeology News
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Mummified dog, found in 1953, undergoing analysis by Mexican archaeologists - Art Daily

Mummified dog, found in 1953, undergoing analysis by Mexican archaeologists - Art Daily | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
Mummified dog, found in 1953, undergoing analysis by Mexican archaeologistsArt Daily“Said finding –detailed archaeologist Alejandro Bautista Valdespino– generates big expectations about archaeology in the north of Mexico.

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Downfall of ancient Greece blamed on 300-year drought - NBC News.com

Downfall of ancient Greece blamed on 300-year drought - NBC News.com | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
A 300-year drought may have caused the demise of several Mediterranean cultures, including ancient Greece, new research suggests. A...

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An Ancient Strip Mall Is Uncovered in Greece - Discovery News

An Ancient Strip Mall Is Uncovered in Greece - Discovery News | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
An Ancient Strip Mall Is Uncovered in Greece
Discovery News
Archaeologists have unearthed one of the oldest strip malls in the world at the ancient city of Argilos in northern Greece.

Via Matthew Ganibi
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Matthew Ganibi's curator insight, October 12, 2013 10:49 PM

An archaeological discovery made in Northern Greece.

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Ancient Greece Democracy

Ancient Greece Democracy | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
Although it lasted only two centuries, Athenian democracy would become one of ancient Greece's most enduring contributions to the modern world.

Via Joy Kinley
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Joy Kinley's curator insight, January 12, 2014 11:23 PM

Why is democracy so important?  The rule of the citizen was a novel concept but the questions then becomes who is a citizen?

Christine Barron's curator insight, January 31, 2014 8:21 PM

The Ancient Democracy was made up of three institutions: Ekklesia, Boule, and Dikasteria. Only males who were 18 years or older were allowed to participate in the democratic procedure.

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The Ancient Greeks' 6 Words for Love (And Why Knowing Them Can ...

The Ancient Greeks' 6 Words for Love (And Why Knowing Them Can ... | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
The ancient Greeks were just as sophisticated in the way they talked about love, recognizing six different varieties. They would have been shocked by our crudeness in using a single word both to whisper "l love you" over a ...

Via Adeleke Kayode
claudia patino's insight:

Love is so beautiful, and the Greeks understood its importance in the ancient world. Having six type of definitions of love makes expressing the love emotion more meaningful. Everyone should continue to practice and to encourage Agape love, which is showing to love to everyone.

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Adeleke Kayode's curator insight, February 17, 2014 2:05 PM

I believe that love is a big deal and so did the Greeks so it is interesting to see that love had many names when it came to its type. So were wildly encourage while others weren't

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BBC History - Ancient Greeks

BBC History - Ancient Greeks | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it

This resource is from the British version of the ABC. It covers all aspects of Ancient Greece in a fun way. It is easy to understand, because it has been designed for primary school students - but the information is still important!


Via Bridget Hoban
claudia patino's insight:

After clicking The Greek World, I learned that civilization started with the Greek people. I am impressed that other civilization or groups of people copied there way of life. Starting democracy, and the Olympic games must have been entertaining and make individuals feel like they have power.

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Relevance of Ancient Technologies to Today’s Global Problems | Development Roast

Relevance of Ancient Technologies to Today’s Global Problems | Development Roast | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it

“More and more and higher-level technology” is heralded as the way that the human population will eventually get itself out of the global troubles it has wreaked. Under-researched genetically modified seeds to be sold to poor rural farmers in India; financially, socially and environmentally expensive Three Dams Project in China; and ethically dubious biofuel alternatives made in order to stem the toxic air pollution of the global transport industry. Each high-tech solution has its merits and its downfalls, of course, but do we always need to be looking forward or could we learn something from our ancestors?Take water, for example. Technically, it makes up 65 -75% of our bodies (depending on who you ask) and 70% of the planet’s surface is water. Much of it is not useful to us as it is found in its saline form in oceans and, in the end, only about 2% of our total water supply is fresh and thus drinkable (with much of that being locked up in glaciers and polar ice-caps, although that source is being unlocked pretty fast through climate change). It does not sound much, but it is still trillions of gallons that should be enough to sustain human and other life for eternity.

In Western countries, we are fortunate enough to have drinking water available literally at our finger tips wherever we go. All we have to do is turn on the tap. Meanwhile, less fortunate nations face severe shortages of fresh, unpolluted, drinkable water. This threat to water security is predicted to be the next big trigger of global discontent leading to what some have called the impending Water Wars.So what are some of the solutions? Since developing country governments are not currently in the financial or political position to be able to purchase and install expensive high-tech water supply systems, we need some inexpensive, locally-appropriate alternatives. Anthropologists and archaeologists point to one such alternative from their study of the ancient Maya.

The Northern Guatemalan Province of Petén, for example, is home to some of the most remarkable ancient Maya sites, including the beautiful Tikal, one of the sets of the 1977 Star Wars Episode IV film. These sites signify a one-time dense population of millions of ancient Maya, who managed to survive and thrive despite the area’s characteristically thin soils, low availability of surface water, a difficult and pronounced dry/wet climatic regime, and periodic droughts. To this day, the area has never been occupied to the same density, partly because modern technology has not been able to provide solutions to these problems.

 

 

 

In a recent article, published by the Global Water Forum, Dr. Ezgi Akpinar Ferrand of Southern Connecticut State University and Prof. Vernon L. Scarborough of the University of Cincinnati summarise decades of research on the ancient Maya’s land-use, food production and water management systems in a changing environment. Through it, they demonstrate how using a relatively simple system of building and maintaining ponds called aguadas the Maya were able to meet their water and food security needs.

The aguadas were dug out and lined with locally sourced natural materials, such as impermeable clay, stone or plaster lining. To make it safe for consumption, the water was filtered with connecting silting tanks and capacity was increased through dredging and by building berms. In the end, given what the researchers know about the size of the aguadas found in ancient Maya sites and the climatic conditions the people were living in, they are able to conclude that this simple technology provided ample fresh, clean water for drinking and for agricultural production needs of the hundreds of thousands of Maya that once inhabited these spaces.

The authors nicely hypothesise:

“that the application of ancient Maya water management systems may present sustainable low technology solutions to increase water and food security among present-day populations living in the same ancient landscape as well as in those nations in comparable geographic areas”.

The bottom line is, at one time, human beings were able to live in harmony with the planet. As Daniel Quinn’s poignant and profound book Ishmael teaches us, somewhere along the path we lost our way. Many modern technologies that are put in place in order to solve one problem have a tendency of creating myriad others. Reaching back instead of constantly looking forward could sometimes prove be more revealing and borrowing from our ancestors could hold the key to setting us back on track.


Via Giri Kumar
claudia patino's insight:

Interesting how our ancestors were able to survive in locations like these without having quick acces to clean water.  Governments of third world country's should probably start investing on clean water methods if they want there nation to survive from the so called water wars.

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The Archaeology News Network: 37 pre-Inca tombs discovered in southern Peru

The Archaeology News Network: 37 pre-Inca tombs discovered in southern Peru | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it

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Sacrificed woman's mummy found in Peru archaeology site - Apple Balla

Sacrificed woman's mummy found in Peru archaeology site - Apple Balla | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it

The mummified remains of a sacrificed woman were discovered by Peruvian archaeologists at the El Brujo complex, researchers said.


Via Elizabeth White
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Rome.info > Roman Colosseum, Coliseum of Rome

Rome.info > Roman Colosseum, Coliseum of Rome | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
Facts on Roman colosseum, info on Coliseum in Rome, Gladiator combats held in Roman colosseum, information on Colosseo di Roma, including Arch of Constantine.

Via Jorge Diego Rivera Nieves
claudia patino's insight:

In the ancient times the roman Colosseum was a place of entertainment for all. Gladiators would fight wild animals like tigers just to entertain others. This article mentioned the gladiators were people who had committed crimes. Such a terrible punishment to die fighting a wild animal.

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Roman News and Archeology: Roman aqueduct found under store in Rome

Roman News and Archeology: Roman aqueduct found under store in Rome | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it

Ruins of the Vergine Aqueduct, one of the most important in ancient Rome, have been discovered under the former Rinascente building off Via del Corso, now the home of Spanish retail giant Zara.

Archaeologists came across the aqueduct under the intersection of Via del Tritone as excavations began to enlarge the retail premises


Via Magni Claudeline, Phil On The Net
claudia patino's insight:

Finding how ancient roman got there water supply is cool. But how was it discovered? Like were buildings being built over the water pipes, did natural disasters occur for the pipes to have vanished and now have been discovered again. Well it is nice that sites like these are being made available to the public to see, and lean about there history.

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Pantheon, Rome.

Pantheon, Rome. | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
The Pantheon is a magnificent ancient temple in Rome that was later converted into the church of Santa Maria ad Martyres. Dating from 125 AD, this is the most complete ancient building in Rome and ...

Via Cristi Moise
claudia patino's insight:

The Pantheon is beautiful. It was important to the roman people because after it was destroyed they reconstructed it. It's name means all the gods, which is very appropriate name for a temple. The Pantheon is still standing in great condition. From the pictures the Romans have kept it well maintained.

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Death and diet: Peru’s sacrificial victims : Past Horizons Archaeology

Death and diet: Peru’s sacrificial victims : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology Findings | Scoop.it
Archaeology News from Past Horizons : Death and diet: Peru’s sacrificial victims http://t.co/amQtsSM1rn

Via Rebeca BM, Rod Powell
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