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Thousand-year old swordsman rises from the earth

Thousand-year old swordsman rises from the earth | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
Archaeology hobbyists were stunned when they unearthed a remarkable historical find from a field in Janakkala, southern Finland. The ancient grave site appeared to be that of an early crusader buried with two swords from different eras.

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Matthew Ganibi's curator insight, November 25, 2013 2:00 AM

An archaeological discovery made in Janakkala, a town in the southern part of Finland.

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Neanderthal String Theory – Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Neanderthal String Theory – Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
Material recovered from the Abri du Maras site in France, appears to provide compelling evidence that twisted fibres were being created by Neanderthals at least 90,000 years ago

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David Connolly's curator insight, November 19, 2013 4:21 PM

In a further study of Neanderthal occupation at Abri du Maras, Ardèche in France, the evidence is stacking up to support the view that this group was behaviourally flexible and capable of creating a variety of sophisticated tools including projectile points and more importantly, cord and string.

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Neolithic death ritual includes earliest evidence for European beer

Neolithic death ritual includes earliest evidence for European beer | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
Spanish archaeologists discovered what they claim to be the earliest scientific evidence of European beer consumption amongst the remains of Neolithic bodies found in a cave

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Katherine Koch's curator insight, January 16, 2014 7:20 PM

Evidence of beer consumption during the Neolithic period found in Barcelona site

Sean P Burns's curator insight, January 31, 2014 5:36 PM

Four human skeletons (in good state of preservation) were found dated to be about 6,400 years old. The skeletons consisted of 2 adults and 2 children. One of the adult skeletons was buried with a two handle drinking vessel. The cup of the male had oxalate and barley-corn phytoliths found, which has been the earliest evidence of fermented beer. Beer might have been part of the death ritual.

Kelsey Cherise Quates's curator insight, April 9, 2014 11:52 PM

 The archaeological dig uncovered some forgotten history, the dig revealed some of the most early burial sites ever. Along with the burial site they found many other things such as stone tools, jewelry, and also food. Among all of the bodies that were uncovered they also found barley and other ingredients used to make beer.

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Lusatian culture cemetery revealed in Poland – Archaeology News...

Lusatian culture cemetery revealed in Poland – Archaeology News... | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
A large Lusatian culture community cemetery dating back 2500 years from the late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age was recently excavated

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David Connolly's curator insight, November 6, 2013 7:32 AM

A large Lusatian culture community cemetery dating back 2500 years from the late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age, was excavated by archaeologists in Łęgowo near Wągrowiec, Poland.

“We examined 151 graves, which contained cremations…we counted more than a thousand ceramic artefacts and pots placed in the graves by mourners” – Marcin Krzepkowski, head of research explained to Science and Scholarship in Poland (PAP).

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Romania welcomes retrieval of 145 ancient Dacian gold coins - Xinhua

Romania welcomes retrieval of 145 ancient Dacian gold coins - Xinhua | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
Romania welcomes retrieval of 145 ancient Dacian gold coins Xinhua 8 (Xinhua) -- The retrieval of 145 ancient Dacian gold coins to Romania is a moment of symbolic significance to its national heritage, Romanian Foreign Minister Titus Corlatean said...
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Trove of sacred Iraqi Jewish texts goes on display in Washington - Haaretz

Trove of sacred Iraqi Jewish texts goes on display in Washington - Haaretz | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
Haaretz Trove of sacred Iraqi Jewish texts goes on display in Washington Haaretz An intelligence official had tipped authorities to the collection's existence, and though rumors of an ancient Talmud proved false, the discovery was nonetheless...
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Extraordinary Roman sculpture found by archaeologists in London...

Extraordinary Roman sculpture found by archaeologists in London... | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
Archaeologists in London have discovered an extraordinary Roman sculpture in the form of an eagle firmly grasping a writhing serpent in its beak

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Persian silk in Viking burials – Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Persian silk in Viking burials – Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it

The silk trade was far more comprehensive than we have hitherto assumed and recent research may change our perceptions of the history of the Norwegian Vikings.

After four years of in-depth investigation of the silk trade of the Viking Age, Marianne Vedeler, Associate Professor at the Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo has found that the Norwegian Vikings maintained trade connections with Persia and the Byzantine Empire through a network of traders from a variety of places and cultures who brought the silk to the Nordic countries.


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Search for the mortal remains of King Richard III begins : Past Horizons Archaeology

Search for the mortal remains of King Richard III begins : Past Horizons Archaeology | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it

Richard III died at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485 and his body is believed to have been buried in the English city of Leicester, but did it remain there and is it still there?


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Tomb of China 'female premier' found

Tomb of China 'female premier' found | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
Archaeologists discover the tomb of China's "female prime minister", Shangguan Wan'er, who was killed in a palace coup in 710 AD.

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Lucero Trejo Guerrero's curator insight, October 24, 2013 5:24 PM

A tomb of a Chinese female was found, that happen to be the tomb of the first female Chinese ruler. Her tomb was found in very bad condition, and she was killed in 710 A.D.

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Ancient dish bearing kanji 'divorce' chant found in Kyoto - Asahi Shimbun

Ancient dish bearing kanji 'divorce' chant found in Kyoto - Asahi Shimbun | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
Ancient dish bearing kanji 'divorce' chant found in Kyoto
Asahi Shimbun
However, it can be surmised from earthenware that was discovered several decades ago in the remains of a garbage dump site of the Nara Period government in Heijokyo.
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Vast ancient tomb raised from the dead by restoration

Vast ancient tomb raised from the dead by restoration | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
An enormous burial mound that captures the rays of the rising equinox sun has regained its splendour after a nine-year restoration

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Larkworthy Antfarm's curator insight, October 13, 2013 4:33 PM

An underground Stonehenge!

 

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Cracking the code: the decipherment of Linear B 60 years on : Past Horizons Archaeology

Cracking the code: the decipherment of Linear B 60 years on : Past Horizons Archaeology | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it

A conference in Cambridge, southeast England, will mark the 60th anniversary of the decipherment by Michael Ventris of Linear B, a script used for an early form of ancient Greek. His stunning achievement pushed back the frontiers of knowledge about the ancient world.

 

When during the early 20th century archaeologists excavated some of the most famous sites of Ancient Greece – notably Knossos on the island of Crete and Mycenae and Pylos on the mainland – they found large numbers of clay tablets inscribed with a type of script that baffled them.


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joseph mora's curator insight, November 5, 2013 2:26 PM

they are finding out what this mysterious script will say

Khai Tran's curator insight, January 21, 2014 10:06 PM

It is very interesting how scientist are able to decipher Ancient codes and find out more facts about history. 

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A Hole in the Head II: Trepanation in Peru

A Hole in the Head II: Trepanation in Peru | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
Trepanation is one of the more interesting osteological finds, and it has fascinated the archaeological world since the mid-19th century when Ephraim Squier discovered a trepanned skull in Cuzco, P...

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Dedication to Lord of Death found at Tehuacan – Archaeology News...

Dedication to Lord of Death found at Tehuacan – Archaeology News... | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
Archaeologists working at the site of Tehuacan have discovered two niches containing skulls and femurs which they believe are dedications to Mictlantecuhtli

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David Connolly's curator insight, November 22, 2013 9:25 AM

Dedicated to Mictlantecuhtli or Lord of Death, archaeologists from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) investigated a shrine thought to be of mid-fourteenth century date located 20 metres to the south of the Great Temple at the site of Tehuacan in Puebla, Mexico.

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Ancient Seikilos Column brings world's oldest song back to life - NEWS.com.au

Ancient Seikilos Column brings world's oldest song back to life - NEWS.com.au | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
Ancient Seikilos Column brings world's oldest song back to life NEWS.com.au Securely housed in the National Museum of Denmark, the marble column has now been "played" once more through the efforts of ancient music researcher Michael Levy and...

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Scientists tracking Brazilian wildlife find ancient cave paintings - UPI.com

Scientists tracking Brazilian wildlife find ancient cave paintings - UPI.com | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
UPI.com Scientists tracking Brazilian wildlife find ancient cave paintings UPI.com "Since we often work in remote locations, we sometimes make surprising discoveries, in this case, one that appears to be important for our understanding of human...

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Projects Go Beyond Restoring Ancient Pingyao's Major Structures - Women of China

Projects Go Beyond Restoring Ancient Pingyao's Major Structures - Women of China | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
Women of China Projects Go Beyond Restoring Ancient Pingyao's Major Structures Women of China An innovative project which fuses the private, government and NGO sectors aims to go beyond restoring ancient Pingyao's major structures to include its...
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International Archaeology Day Exhibit

International Archaeology Day Exhibit | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it

The Institute of Archaeology celebrated International Archaeology Day by having an exhibit at their main office in Belmopan.  They got many great pictures of the event and the primary school students that were able to attend it.  Dr. Jaime Awe, Antonio Beardall, and the rest were there celebrating the event and imparting their knowledge of archaeology.  Daniel Meza, of New Life Presbyterian School in Orange Walk, won the poster competition.  Thanks, IA!


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Protecting Buddhist Carvings in Pakistan - Archaeology Magazine

Protecting Buddhist Carvings in Pakistan - Archaeology Magazine | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
MINGORA, PAKISTAN—Rock carvings of Buddhist iconography dating from 1,000 to 2,000 years ago in Pakistan's Swat Valley are under threat from neglect, say archaeologists. The reliefs are from the Gandhara civilization, ...

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Ancient Graffiti At Pompei: Early Wall Posts And Political Slogans

Ancient Graffiti At Pompei: Early Wall Posts And Political Slogans | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it

A study conducted on the graffiti found on Pompeii’s walls reveals it was an early form of political campaigning and social networking.
The Ancient Roman city was covered in ash when Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79AD. Much of the graffiti on the ancient city’s walls is preserved in remarkable detail.
Research conducted by archaeologist Eeva-Maria Viitanen, a post-doctoral researcher at Finland’s University of Helsinki, shows that Pompeii homeowners had some control over who scrawled on the walls of their houses. Speaking at the annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America in Seattle, she explained that graffiti was scratched into the stucco walls, written with charcoal, or in many cases even created by professional painters hired for political campaigns.
Viitanen is a project manager and co-ordinator for the Pompeii Project of the University of Helsinki. She examined more than 1,000 political messages found on walls in three areas of Pompeii.
She discovered that in 40% of cases, political adverts were placed on the walls of the homes belonging to the wealthy, which is notable given their homes were outnumbered by shops, bars and the dwellings inhabited by the city’s poor. Viitanen hazarded a guess why, saying: “Bars were probably more populated, but could their customers read and would they vote?”
Viitanen suggested the rich Ancient Romans were happy to allow their lavish homes to be used as prime advertising space for political slogans aimed at drumming up votes for political candidates during electoral campaigns. Such permission may have even signalled an endorsement. Viitanen told the journal ‘LiveScience’: “The facades of the private houses and even the street walks in front of them were controlled and maintained by the owner of the house, and in that respect, the idea that the wall space could be appropriated by anyone who wanted to do it seems unlikely.”
The archaeologist found that the majority of political ads are in areas that were likely to get most traffic, and consequently guaranteed exposure and targeted an audience. She told ‘Live Science’ that the slogans were simple, perhaps saying that a named candidate was “worthy of public office” or “a good man”. However, in a nod to early spin and the bella figura, she revealed that one candidate boasted of his ability to bake bread.
The political slogans are not the only type of graffiti found in Pompeii. The Ancient Roman citizens scribbled thousands of messages on the city’s walls, including literary quotes and greetings to friends, suggesting there was a thriving form of social networking centuries before Facebook was invented.


Via Mariano Pallottini
Andrew Hernandez's insight:

the link to the site is broken, but the info is written on here

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Hunter gatherer and farmer lived side by side for 2000 years –...

Hunter gatherer and farmer lived side by side for 2000 years –... | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it

Intriguing new results from a study undertaken by the Institute of Anthropology at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) that has just been published in the journal Science, show indigenous Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and immigrant Neolithic farmers lived side-by-side for more than 2,000 years in Central Europe.

 


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Ancient Egyptian Fake Toes Earliest Prosthetics - Discovery News

Ancient Egyptian Fake Toes Earliest Prosthetics - Discovery News | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it

Ancient Egyptian Fake Toes Earliest ProstheticsDiscovery NewsFalse toe. Two ancient Egyptian wooden toes have been confirmed as the world's oldest prosthetics, according to scientific tests.


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In Bolivia, Archeologists Find 1500-Year-Old Bones And Skulls In Lake Titicaca - Huffington Post

In Bolivia, Archeologists Find 1500-Year-Old Bones And Skulls In Lake Titicaca - Huffington Post | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
In Bolivia, Archeologists Find 1500-Year-Old Bones And Skulls In Lake Titicaca
Huffington Post
In the late 1960s French explorer Jacques-Yves Cousteau conducted several expeditions in Lake Titicaca, finding signs of a civilization.

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World's only surviving Bronze Age metropolis in Pakistan faces ruin

World's only surviving Bronze Age metropolis in Pakistan faces ruin | Ancient Cities | Scoop.it
Archeologists say that 5,000 year-old city of Mohenjodaro, the world's oldest planned urban landscape, is being rapidly corroded by salt and could disappear within 20 years

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