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Symbols and Signs: Tree of Life and its Meaning

Symbols and Signs: Tree of Life and its Meaning | analytic psychology | Scoop.it
Symbolism of Tree of Life across different cultures, discovering a magical key to how life manifests itself, a complex formula of existence, the flow of creation from Divine to Earth and back to Divine.

 

The Mayan believed heaven to be a wonderful, magical place on Earth hidden by a mystical mountain.  They called this place Tamoanchan.  Heaven, Earth, and Underworld (Xibalba) were connected by the ‘world tree’.  The world tree grew at the locus of creation, all things flowing out from that spot into four directions.  These were: East associated with red, Northrepresented by white, West that is black and South that is yellow.  The Mayan tree of life is a cross with its centre... (Click title for more)


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a wonderful exposition from many traditions revealing its manifold meanings..

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Jung and Synchronicity: The Union of Nature and Psyche

Jung and Synchronicity: The Union of Nature and Psyche | analytic psychology | Scoop.it

C.G. Jung determined that the psychological and physical features we perceive in the world are dual aspects of one underlying reality (Pauli et al., 2001). He came to view mind and matter as a continuum, with psyche located on one end and the physiological instinct on the other, and the archetype serving as the bridge between them (C. G. Jung, 1947/1985, p. 216), though he ultimately expressed a desire to do away with a theory of psychophysical parallelism altogether in lieu of a unitary reality known as the unus mundus, a union of spirit, soul and body (C. G. Jung, 1958/1978a, p. 452).

Pointing to ways in which inanimate objects seem to “collaborate” with the unconscious by forming symbolic patterns, Jung even cited instances where clocks stop at the moment of their owner’s passing, or where items break within a home where someone is going through a powerful emotional crisis. Click title to read more...


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I loved this - so insightful and broadening. Thank you.

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Carl Jung: "... When I treat Catholics who arc suffering from neurosis..."

Carl Jung: "... When I treat Catholics who arc suffering from neurosis..." | analytic psychology | Scoop.it

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Carl Jung on "The Symbolic Life"

Carl Jung on "The Symbolic Life" | analytic psychology | Scoop.it

From C.G. Jung...."You see, man is in need of a symbolic life - badly in need. We only live banal, ordinary, rational, or irrational things . . . but we have no symbolic life. Where do we live symbolically? Nowhere except where we participate in the ritual of life. . . . "

Have you got a corner somewhere in your house where you perform the rites, as you can see in India? Even the very simple houses there have at least a curtained corner where the members of the household can perform the symbolic life, where they can make their new vows or their meditation. We don't have it; we have no such corner. We have our own room, of course, - but there is a telephone that can ring us up at any time, and we always must be ready. We have no time, no place.

We have no symbolic life, and we are all badly in need of the symbolic life. Only the symbolic life can express the need of the soul - the daily need of the soul, mind you! And because people have no such thing, they can never step out of this mill - this awful, banal, grinding life in which ... (Click title for more)


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Aladin Fazel's curator insight, December 6, 2013 3:47 PM

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Jung Currents: What's Up with Carl Jung: Jung, Halloween and the Shadow

Jung Currents: What's Up with Carl Jung: Jung, Halloween and the Shadow | analytic psychology | Scoop.it

(From 2008)...Usually, most of us try to be on our best behavior. We dress appropriately, speak politely and try to fit in with others where we work, where we socialize and where we go to school. Then comes Halloween, where despite the economy, 64.5 percent of consumers plan to spend a total of $5.77 billion on the holiday this year, according to the National Retail Federation's recent survey.

It's an opportunity for a shy musician to transform into a scary witch and for children to don fairy wings and imagine themselves in flight.
And that's great, says Ron Schenk, a Jungian analyst with private practices in Dallas and Houston.

"Halloween gives a place for those parts of our psyche that don't fit in," Dr. Schenk says. "You can dress up as a princess and feel you are the 


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Depth Insights » Jung in the Garden of Eden: A Myth of the Transformation of Consciousness by Arthur George, J.D

Depth Insights » Jung in the Garden of Eden: A Myth of the Transformation of Consciousness by Arthur George, J.D | analytic psychology | Scoop.it

The biblical story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden (Genesis Chapters 2-3) is foundational to our Western culture and has influenced the upbringing and psychology of all of us, whether we realize it or not. Mythologists as well as many biblical scholars recognize the story as being in the genre of myth, which makes it appropriate to analyze it from the perspective of depth psychology, among other approaches.

 

Indeed, as Joseph Campbell concluded, “This story yields its meaning only to a psychological interpretation” (2001, p. 50). Further, Carl Jung (CW 9.2, para. 230) had already written that “cosmogonic myths are, at bottom, symbols for the coming of consciousness.” But the literature about the Eden story taking such a psychological approach is scant, largely due to traditional and problematic gaps and tensions between academic disciplines....

 

. - See more at: http://www.depthinsights.com/Depth-Insights-scholarly-ezine/jung-in-the-garden-of-eden-a-myth-of-the-transformation-of-consciousness-arthur-george-j-d/#sthash.nvkjfuuH.dpuf


Via Bonnie Bright
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thank you - a valuable and interesting exposition

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Who is Carl Jung and What is Jungian Psychology?

Who is Carl Jung and What is Jungian Psychology? | analytic psychology | Scoop.it

Carl Jung is widely recognized as one of the greatest thinkers of the last century and is one the founding fathers of psychoanalyses and dream work. His psychology emphasizes the value of one’s creative forces and one’s development toward wholeness.


Jung’s contributions include: A theory of the structure and dynamics of the psyche, personal unconscious and collective unconscious; Dream work; A theory of personality types (introvert/extrovert); The process of psychological development or “individuation,” which has terms that have become part of our language as complexes and archetypes.
Jung transformed psychotherapy from a practice concerned with treatment of the sick into a means... (Click title to read more)


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Ecopsychology 101: James Hillman and the pain of community loss

Ecopsychology 101: James Hillman and the pain of community loss | analytic psychology | Scoop.it

Ecopsychology, as propounded by James Hillman, a therapist based in northeast Connecticut, seeks to redefine the goals of psychology by paying heed to the health of one's environment just as one would the pathology of one's family. "Psychology, so dedicated to awakening human consciousness, needs to wake itself up to one of the most ancient human truths: we cannot be studied or cured apart from the planet."

 

"When a farm is subdeveloped, acres of trees go down or there's an oil spill in town, you feel it deeply and it goes on in you for so long, every time you walk past that place," said Hillman, who has successfully fought road extensions and subdevelopments in his town. "That never comes into consciousness. It is never talked about on the community level. People all know this inside their bodies. That's the horror. It hurts. When I see old healthy trees go down it hurts."


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Eva Rider's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:36 PM

More and more relevant moment by moment in our time

 

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Jungian Views on Folktales - The Gold Scales | ...

Jungian Views on Folktales - The Gold Scales | ... | analytic psychology | Scoop.it
Jung was free to look into basic issues of Eastern and other sources, including traditional sources of Europe. Things depend in part on what Jack and Jill were taught to look up to and back up at a tender age.

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To paraphrase Einstein.. he was asked how children could be encouraged to be more 'clever' - he responded by saying 'read fairy stories, and more fairy stories to your children', referring no doubt to the use of imagination and its value.

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