American Revolution
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The American Revolution

The American Revolution | American Revolution | Scoop.it
Want to learn about the American Revolution? Check out our American Revolution section.
Student SLIS's insight:

Summary:

This site contains an extensive amount of information on the American Revolution, especially the various battles of the war. The content is remarkably well organized. The main page has a timeline with links to more information about the major events of each year, such as the Stamp Act or the Battle of Bunker Hill. Links to other sites devoted to the events of the American Revolution are provided. Also linked are Amazon.com pages for books about the American Revolution.

 

Applicable NH State Social Studies Standards Grades 5-6:

 

SS:CV:6:3.2: Describe ways in which countries interact with each other culturally, economically, diplomatically, or militarily. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, F: Global Transformation)

SS:CV:6:3.3: Discuss the reasons for conflicts between and among countries and peoples, e.g. , natural resources or religion. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, D: Material Wants and Needs, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:HI:6:1.1: Explain how and why people have developed forms of self-government, e.g., the Mayflower Compact or the Iroquois League. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:HI:6:5.2: Describe the impact of major national and state events on everyday life, e.g., the Industrial Revolution or the World War II  home front. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:WH:6:1.1: Describe different types of political systems created by people, e.g., the tribe, the empire or the nation-state. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:WH:6:1.2: Explore the use and abuse of power. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, F: Global Transformation, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

 

Why this is a Quality resource:

The readability scores of this website at about the 8th grade level. However, the information is broken down into small chunks so it should not be too much of a stretch for 5th grade students reading at or above grade level to process the material. Unfortunately, the site does not use many images to enhance its content. Another negative aspect to using this site is the prominent ads, which distract attention away from the main material. Still, I believe this is a good resource because the information is organized extremely well and has many links to other quality resources. It can be helpful for providing additional information on specific historical events, especially battles.

 

Dawn Hall

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Wyoming Library Resources Login Page

Student SLIS's insight:

This is a subscription website through Encyclopedia Britannica. Wyoming State Library funds the subscription for the state making it free for residents and schools. Britannica School is a research site that provides several resources for researching the American Revolution. Searches can be done by levels: Level 1-Elementary, Level 2- Middle School, and Level 3- High School. The site includes articles, images, maps, videos, and links to other websites. The colorful interface makes it appealing to kid and the simplicity of organization makes it easy to use.

 

This is a quality website because it is published by a reputable company. It is also easy to navigate and the leveled resources make it easy for teachers to use it with their classes. It is nice to have such a variety of images, articles and videos in one place. A downside to this site was in the images link: sometimes images would be pulled up that did not really have anything to do with the American Revolution. A link to lesson plans relating to the American Revolution is also provided in this website. The best part is when an article is selected: it is then broken down into sections labeled with the main idea of those paragraphs that students can click on and go right to that idea in the article. Very easy to navigate. The articles are also given lexile scores and are connected to the different sets of standards (Common Core, Canadian, State Standards).

 

This site connects with Wyoming Social Studies Content Standards:

SS5.6.1 Use various media resources in order to address a question or solve a problem.

SS5.6.3 Use digital tools to research, design, and present social studies concepts.


Paige Bredenkamp

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Ben's Guide (3-5): Historical Documents

Ben's Guide (3-5): Historical Documents | American Revolution | Scoop.it
Student SLIS's insight:

Summary:

Ben’s Guide to US Government for Kids is a website that teaches kids about U.S. government and U.S. history. There is a section for children in grades 3-5 that includes a historical documents section. The Historical Documents section discusses four documents that are important to the American Revolution which are the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, the Constitution, and The Bill of Rights. The Declaration of Independence includes the text of the Declaration as well as links to learn more about the Declaration. The articles of Confederation explain the articles, includes more links to find out about them in their entirety, and also includes pictures of the original documents. The Constitution section includes a synopsis of how the Constitution came to be, links to information about the American Revolution, Articles of Confederation, delegates, and Founding Fathers, as well as information about the Constitution, Early American History, and the text of the Constitution. The Bill of Rights section explains the history behind the Bill of rights, a link to the definition of the word amended, a list of some of the freedom and rights included in the Bill of Rights, and links to additional information about the Bill of Rights.

 

Why This Is a Quality Resource:

This is a quality resource because it describes four important documents from the American Revolution that shaped the U.S. government and therefore the country. The website is kid-friendly and include a cartoon picture of Ben Franklin for each document description. The history behind each document is told in no more than three paragraphs, which makes it easy for students to follow. It also includes the full text to the Declaration of Independence, something that many students must be familiar with or even memorize. The description of each document include links to other related information from the Revolutionary time period.

 

Kerry Darling

 

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Best Instructional Videos: American Revolution

Best Instructional Videos: American Revolution | American Revolution | Scoop.it
Learning about this key historical event has never been so much fun for students across the grades.
Student SLIS's insight:

Summary:

This is a webpage containing links and information on several short videos that the author considers the best for instruction on this topic. The videos range between 3 and 24 minutes in length. Some are animated, other are live action. Each selection is annotated with a description, information on its grade level appropriateness, and addresses its “coolness”, or level of student engagement, factor.

 

Applicable NH State Social Studies Standards Grades 5-6:

 

SS:CV:6:2.1:  Illustrate ways in which government in the United States is founded on the conviction that Americans are united by the principles they share, e.g., life, liberty, and property. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:CV:6:2.2: Identify and illustrate the heritage that early settlers brought to the development and establishment of American democracy, e.g., political, legal, philosophical, or religious traditions. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:CV:6:3.2: Describe ways in which countries interact with each other culturally, economically, diplomatically, or militarily. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, F: Global Transformation)

SS:CV:6:3.3: Discuss the reasons for conflicts between and among countries and peoples, e.g. , natural resources or religion. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, D: Material Wants and Needs, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:HI:6:1.1: Explain how and why people have developed forms of self-government, e.g., the Mayflower Compact or the Iroquois League. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:HI:6:1.2: Explain how the foundations of American democracy are rooted in European, Native American and colonial traditions, experiences and institutions. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:HI:6:5.1: Explain the impact ethnic and religious groups have had on the development of the United States, e.g., the Irish or the Mormons. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:HI:6:5.2: Describe the impact of major national and state events on everyday life, e.g., the Industrial Revolution or the World War II  home front. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:WH:6:1.1: Describe different types of political systems created by people, e.g.,  the tribe, the empire or the nation-state. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:WH:6:1.2: Explore the use and abuse of power. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, F: Global Transformation, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

 

Why this is a Quality Resource:

The videos load right from this webpage, making it unnecessary to search for them on YouTube or another website. Videos are a great resource to introduce or reinforce unit lessons, especially for reluctant or below grade level readers. They are also an important resource for meeting Common Core Standards on learning from different formats and in developing listening skills.

 

Dawn Hall

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The BEST Revolutionary War Rap - With Lyrics - YouTube

Mr. Simons' 5th grade class raps about the different events of the Revolutionary War.
Student SLIS's insight:

Summary:

The BEST Revolutionary Rap With Lyrics is a youtube video of a rap about the Revolutionary War. The video was created by a fifth grade class with a teacher named Mr. Simon. The video plays the rap lyrics while the words are shown. The letters are white and the background is black. The video is three minutes and 47 seconds in length. The lyrics discuss how the Revolutionary War began, the countries that were involved in fighting in the war, the major battles of the war, and the war’s outcome.

 

Why This Is a Quality Resource:

The BEST Revolutionary Rap With Lyrics is a quality resource because it teaches students about the Revolutionary War through music in a way that is simple but engaging. The lyrics are catchy and they explain the Revolutionary War by touching on key points of the war briefly but concisely. The man rapping articulates the words clearly so students can follow along and even learn the lyrics themselves. Teachers can use the rap to teach students about the war and help them remember key facts through song. It is a great resource for students who are reluctant readers and/or not interested in history and who are also musically gifted. This rap can encourage students to write their own raps or songs about history.

 

Kerry Darling

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The American Revolutionary War (In Minecraft) - YouTube

The American Revolutionary War (In Minecraft) We are back, with yet another Minecraft-History related video! This time, we take a brave new direction and tak...
Student SLIS's insight:

Lisa Gatzen

 

Summary

 

This brief summary of The American Revolution takes place in Minecraft. It is narrated by the creators and the battle scenes depicted are set to appropriate music. The video is just under 15 minutes, yet covers several topics:

Ø  Lexington and Concord

Ø  Bunker Hill

Ø  Washington’s Victories

Ø  Crossing the Delaware

Ø  General Burgoyne

Ø  Yorktown

Ø  The British Retreat 

 

Review

 

I think that this is a great resource for students learning about The American Revolution. While it is not an in-depth account of the war, it does provide a look at some of the turning points. It is a great tool for those students that are interested in video games. This video links 21st century technology to history, therefore making history fun.  It is also a useful tool for those that are reluctant readers or those that struggle with reading. The information provided is short and to the point and I think that this video will hold students’ interests. Because this is a video that is done by amateurs and most likely students it will inspire them to be creative in an American Revolution Assignment. It would make a great opener to a Lesson on The American Revolution. The only negative about this Minecraft video is that the narration is not as clear as it could be. I did have to playback one or two sentences because I could not understand the speaker or the background music was too loud for the speaker's voice.  

 

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Schoolhouse Rock- No More Kings

The Colonists rebelled against King George III.
Student SLIS's insight:

Lisa Gatzen

 

Summary

 

This 3 minute cartoon video with a catchy song provides a very brief overview of how the United States came to be. The story begins with the pilgrims and the colonist’s dependence on England. Once the colonies were formed they colonists wanted to run them on their own, without interference from England.  Next comes taxation without representation and the Boston Tea Party. Followed by the declaration of Independence and the American Revolution.

 

Review

 

I chose this resource because I remember waiting for Schoolhouse Rock videos every Saturday morning. It is such a fun way to learn about history. No More King is a great way to introduce a lesson on the American Revolution. It will capture their attention and hopefully peak the kids’ interest. Although it is not an in-depth look at the American Revolution, it is still something that can be used successfully in the classroom.  Even though this video is at least 20 years old, it is still entertaining and relevant. I just used this video as a homepage attention-grabber for my LIBR 250 KBC. 

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Revolutions: February 2014

Revolutions: February 2014 | American Revolution | Scoop.it
A podcast exploring the great revolutions of history.
Student SLIS's insight:

Lisa Gatzen

 

Summary

 

The Revolutions Podcast is a weekly podcast series examining great political revolutions. The currently the revolution that is being presented is the American Revolution. The podcasts begins with a brief tour of the thirteen colonies called The New World and continues through Turning South which covers the arrival of the French Fleet and obtaining Savannah. The topic of the American Revolution is not completed with the last weekly podcast Turning South dated April 21, 2014. The podcasts are approximately 30 minutes each. The Revolutions Podcast is presented by Mike Duncan. He has a degree in Political Science from Western Washington University.

 

Review

 

The Revolutions Podcast’s series on The American Revolution is a great tool that can be used in conjunction with a lesson about The American Revolution. Mike Duncan provides a wonderful resource for anyone wishing to learn about The American Revolution. Although the podcasts in not specifically for school-aged children, they can most definitely benefit from this resource. Essentially, the podcasts are generally lectures, however, it is not someone just blurting out a bunch of facts. The casual and down-to-earth tone allows the listener to become interested in the story without feeling like they are being taught-at. This series of podcasts can be used in the classroom, in the library or at home. They can be used individually or as a series. The auditory learner and the reluctant or struggling reader will greatly benefit from listening to a podcast versus reading text. This would also be useful for anyone that wanted to brush up on their American Revolution facts or is just interested in the topic.  Even though the Revolutions Podcast’s series on The American Revolution has not yet run the full course of the war, it is a still valuable resource. 

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Women in The American Revolution

Women in The American Revolution | American Revolution | Scoop.it
Student SLIS's insight:

This site focuses on women that participated in the American Revolution or who worked to promote the ideals held by the revolutionaries during that period. Some of the women included are Abigail Adams, Phillis Wheatley, Betsy Ross, Mercy Otis Warren, and Deborah Samson. Each woman’s name is a link to a brief biography. Other links include resources, links to other websites of this nature, and activities. It is a school-sponsored website that is written for 4th grade or above.

 

This is a quality website because it is straightforward. Since it is a school-sponsored website there are no distracting advertisements. The links are viable, and the biographies, though short, are enough to start a student on the path to research. Many of the names are unfamiliar; these are famous as well as lesser-known women who participated. They came from all walks of life and include wives, slaves, and Indians. This is a great website to use to incorporate women into history projects, as women tend to be underrepresented. Unfortunately there are some spelling and grammatical errors and the biographies are quite short. Overall, the content is compelling and the links provided are great for pursuing more information about these women and more on the American Revolution. There is also a glossary of words that may be unfamiliar to students as well as words that were used during that time period.

 

This site connects with Wyoming Social Studies Content Standards:

SS.5.2.1 Identify and describe the ways groups (e.g., families, communities, schools, and social organizations) meet human needs and concerns (e.g., belonging, self worth, and personal safety) and contribute to personal identity and daily life.

SS5.4.4  Discuss different groups that a person may belong to (e.g., family, neighborhood, cultural/ethnic, and workplace) and how those roles and /or groups have changed over time.

SS5.6.1 Use various media resources in order to address a question or solve a problem.

 

Paige Bredenkamp

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Music During the American Revolutionary War - The Music of Early America

Popular Music During the Revolutionary War included Dying Redcoat, Free America, Poor Old Tory, and Jefferson and Liberty
Student SLIS's insight:

This web page offers tunes that were popular during the American Revolution including “Dying Redcoat” and “Poor Old Tory.” These tunes are played simply as they would have been in the time period. The page is part of a larger site called Archiving Early America. This site provides a multitude of information about the Revolutionary War. Viewers can glimpse videos, rare images, and obituaries from this time period.

 

This is a quality page that offers music recordings of the era. Though the site is supported by advertising, thus there are many distracting promotions, the music page offers free music that is easy to download and there are not any pop-ups that get in the way. This is a great page to use to add some musical interest to a lesson. Also, students can access the music to enhance a project on this topic.

 

This site connects with Wyoming Social Studies Content Standards:

SS.5.2.2 Identify and describe ways in which expressions of culture influence people (e.g., language, spirituality, stories, folktales, music, art, and dance).

 

Paige Bredenkamp

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Liz Ruth Hargis's curator insight, September 28, 2014 11:16 AM

Links to music popular with American revolutionaries.

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Spy Letters of the American Revolution -- From the Collections of the Clements Library

Spy Letters of the American Revolution -- From the Collections of the Clements Library | American Revolution | Scoop.it
Student SLIS's insight:

This site is a digitized rendition of the Sir Henry Clinton Collection at the Clements Library. Its focus is on spies, espionage, and secret codes and their importance in the outcome of the war. The site includes primary resources in the form of letters written by both American and British spies. A timeline of the American Revolution is provided, as well as a “Teacher’s Lounge” link where classroom activities are available, including how to make invisible ink!

 

This is a quality resource because it is arranged neatly and simply. The links are clear and the pages are easy to get to. There are no advertisements and embedded links are not so numerous as to be distracting. This site would best be used under the direction of a classroom teacher. A highlight of the site is the classroom activities under the Teacher’s Lounge link: it offers a recipe for invisible ink and directions for making various secret codes that were actually used during the American Revolution!

 

This site connects with Wyoming Social Studies Content Standards:

SS5.1.1 Describe the basic rights and responsibilities of citizenship.

SS5.1.3 Understand the basic origins of the United States Constitution (e.g., Declaration of Independence).

SS5.4.1 Describe how small changes can lead to big changes (cause and effect)(e.g., discovery of electricity).

SS5.4.5 Identify differences between primary and secondary sources. Find primary and secondary sources about an historical event. Summarize ideas in primary and secondary resources.

 

Paige Bredenkamp

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American Revolution - produced using the Fling the Teacher Generator from ContentGenerator.net

American Revolution - produced using the Fling the Teacher Generator from ContentGenerator.net | American Revolution | Scoop.it
Student SLIS's insight:

This online game offers a quiz of great fun for young kids learning about the American Revolution. Created by Andrew Field for educational purpose, this quiz consists of fifteen questions challenging test takers’ knowledge about essential facts related to the causes, important events, and key figures of the American Revolution. The game is designed with the scenario of a cartoon teacher asking questions while the player to answer: to “fling the teacher” the student has to respond with the correct answers all the way through the fifteen questions in one shot --- any single wrong answer will send the player back to the start. Such a setting makes the program more challenging and help building and testing a solid knowledge of the player. A number of added features of the program include: player can customize the cartoon teacher figure by choosing funny hair color, hairstyle skin color and eyeglasses etc; the answers’ sequence for each question is randomized for each trial; during the course, player gets three (and only three) chances for help, one giving hint for a correct answer, one giving vote counts on the answers, and one removing two incorrect answers. These valuable features create a lot of fun and make the game especially interesting and appealing to young children.  

 

This program is created for children and their educators’ use. It can be used as classroom activity or at-home assignment or just spare-time fun game. It supports a few standards from “History-Social Science Content Standards for California Public Schools”: “5.5 Students explain the causes of the American Revolution”; “5.6 Students understand the course and consequences of the American Revolution”; “5.7 Students describe the people and events associated with the development of the U.S. Constitution and analyze the Constitution’s significance as the foundation of the American republic”.

 

The game offers a great resource of high quality for educating young children (and adults as well) about some fifteen most essential facts that one should know about the American Revolution. While the contents may not be as comprehensive as many other sources on the subject, the game with its many  fun features, does a wonderful job by engaging players and letting them have fun experiences. The challenge it poses can trigger the students’ strong interests in achieving the goal: to “fling the teacher”! During the course of playing this game, the players surely get a solid knowledge on all fifteen questions. The design is simple, but children friendly and easy to use and understand. It can certainly be deployed as a nice assessment tool for testing students’ learning outcome about the subject of the American Revolution.  

 

Yi Jiang

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American Revolution from: WatchKnowLearn - Free K-12 educational videos

American Revolution from: WatchKnowLearn - Free K-12 educational videos | American Revolution | Scoop.it
Free K-12 educational videos … organized. Tens of thousands of excellent, educational videos in a huge, intuitive directory. Organized, reviewed, rated, and described by teachers. Ideal as a supplement to a curriculum or for independent study. Designed for teachers, students, parents, homeschoolers, educators … and all life-long learners!
Student SLIS's insight:

This linked page from "Watch Know Learn" website offers a very rich collection of educational video sources, specifically focusing on the subject area of American Revolution. The whole website includes lists of thousands of educational video sources organized into directory structure in correspondence to school curricula. In the "American Revolution" sub-directory, there are 27 videos listed directly under it and another 115 videos listed under its own sub-categories such as "The Declaration of Independence", "Causes of the Revolution", "Revolutionary War Battles", etc. The listed videos are all freely accessible sources on the Internet.

 

The contents of the videos collected at this source can be easily selected and integrated into curriculum activities that support a number of standards from “History-Social Science Content Standards for California Public Schools”, including: “5.5 Students explain the causes of the American Revolution”; “5.6 Students understand the course and consequences of the American Revolution”; 5.7 Students describe the people and events associated with the development of the U.S. Constitution and analyze the Constitution’s significance as the foundation of the American republic”.

 

Although with little video contents of its own, this is a quality source that essentially curates a large variety of online freely available video sources. Its big volume of selection and curriculum-friendly organization of the various sources on American Revolution (as well as on all other curricular directories) clearly prove its high quality. The lists are carefully chosen based on the videos' quality, relevance and appropriateness for educational purposes. Each entry of sources is given a title, a source link, a brief description, proper age range, count of views and rating on a five-star scale, as well as other useful information. The five-star rating feature is very useful. An additional feature is that the website is also partially available in Spanish as well as in Chinese languages. As the website proudly claims, what it offers are --- "Free educational videos. Organized." 

 

Yi Jiang

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American Revolution Center : Collections Timeline

American Revolution Center : Collections Timeline | American Revolution | Scoop.it
Student SLIS's insight:

Summary:

This is an interactive timeline created by the Museum of the American Revolution, which plans to open in a new building in Philadelphia in 2016. The timeline begins in 1750 and continues to 2009. By sliding the window along the dateline at the bottom of the image, or by clicking the hand icon to the left or right, the viewer can browse the images and the text displayed on the timeline. Clicking on an image or text brings up another window with details about the particular historical artifact or event shown.

 

Applicable NH State Social Studies Standards Grades 5-6:

 

SS:CV:6:1.2: Identify the core ideals and principles of American government by citing documents, e.g., the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, or the Bill of Rights. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:CV:6:2.2: Identify and illustrate the heritage that early settlers brought to the development and establishment of American democracy, e.g., political, legal, philosophical, or religious traditions. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:CV:6:3.2: Describe ways in which countries interact with each other culturally, economically, diplomatically, or militarily. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, F: Global Transformation)

SS:HI:6:1.2: Explain how the foundations of American democracy are rooted in European, Native American and colonial traditions, experiences and institutions. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:HI:6:5.1: Explain the impact ethnic and religious groups have had on the development of the United States, e.g., the Irish or the Mormons. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:HI:6:5.2: Describe the impact of major national and state events on everyday life, e.g., the Industrial Revolution or the World War II  home front. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:HI:6:5.4: Describe similarities and differences in the immigrant experience for various ethnic groups, e.g., the English or Chinese. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:WH:6:1.1: Describe different types of political systems created by people, e.g., the tribe, the empire or the nation-state. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:WH:6:1.2: Explore the use and abuse of power. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, F: Global Transformation, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

 

Why this is a Quality Resource:

The timeline has been crafted beautifully. The images are very attractive and the content is unconventional in comparison to information found in textbooks or typical non-fiction children’s books on the subject. The material is similar to visiting an actual museum in that the viewer is able to look at and learn about real physical items used during the period. Many of artifacts included in the timeline belonged to important historical figures such as Marquis de Lafayette and George Washington. The website,  http://amrevmuseum.org, also includes a search tool to find lesson plans, an interactive test, and more images with additional information about artifacts in the collection. This website is a good way to extend social studies lessons into areas not usually explored in the classroom. It can also be used to generate original ideas for student research projects on the American Revolution.

 

Dawn Hall

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Interactive Map: Revolutionary War Battles, 1775 - 1778

Interactive Map: Revolutionary War Battles, 1775 - 1778 | American Revolution | Scoop.it
Student SLIS's insight:

Summary:

This is an interactive map of Revolutionary War battles and campaigns. Clicking on the name of a battle in the map legend causes color-coded icons to appear on the map at the location where the battle took place and/or the route the campaign took before engaging in a battle. The icons are color-coded according to whether the British or the Americans won. The dates of the battles are also included along with a few questions to consider.

 

Applicable NH State Social Studies Standards Grades 5-6:

 

SS:CV:6:3.2: Describe ways in which countries interact with each other culturally, economically, diplomatically, or militarily. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, F: Global Transformation)

S:GE:6:1.1: Translate mental maps into appropriate graphics to display geographic information and answer geographic questions, e.g., countries through which a person would travel between Cairo and Nairobi. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:GE:6:1.2: Apply the spatial concepts of location, distance, direction, scale, movement, and region, e.g., the relative and absolute location of the student's community, or the diffusion of the English language to the United States. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment, F: Global Transformation)

 

Why this is a Quality Resource:

This is a good visual aid for learning this material and for meeting standards related to map skills. The interactive element makes it even more effective for learning and retaining the information.

 

Dawn Hall

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Kids History: American Revolution

Kids History: American Revolution | American Revolution | Scoop.it
Kids learn about the American Revolution. How it started, battles fought, timeline, and major events.
Student SLIS's insight:

Summary:

Ducksters is a website that covers a number of educational subjects for elementary school students. The topics of the American Revolution page include Revolutionary War events such the timeline of the American Revolution, the Stamp Act, and the Boston Massacre, people from the Revolutionary period such as Abigail Adams, Ben Franklin, and John Adams, Battles from the Revolutionary War such as Bunker Hill and Lexington and Concord, and other miscellaneous information such as information on Revolutionary War uniforms and Revolutionary War soldiers. Each individual event, person, battle, etc. include written descriptions as well as visuals such as famous paintings depicting the Revolution and also pictures of Revolutionary documents such as the Constitution.

 

Why This is a Quality Resource:

Ducksters is a quality resource because it includes information about important elements of the Revolutionary War and presents them in a way that is interesting and visually appealing. The site is easy for students to navigate and there is an excellent balance between text and illustration. It has the look of an elementary school history book in the format of a webpage, but it also includes six cute yellow cartoon ducks at the top of the page that help to give it a more relaxed, less-studious feel. A lot of information is included but each event, battle, person, and other fact is described briefly and concisely so students will not feel overwhelmed or bored. The Revolutionary War events and Battles also each include a ten question quiz to help students review what they have read, so it is a great resource to help students study for quizzes and tests in their U.S. history classes.

 

Kerry Darling

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Patriots vs. Loyalists Debate - YouTube

04/01/11 - SKYHAWK NEWS - Sacajawea Elementary School * Highlights from our Patriots vs. Loyalists social studies debate. * Performed by Mr. Lee's Class
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Summary:

This is a video created by fifth grade students from Sacajawea Elementary School in Vancouver, Washington. The video begins with pictures of famous Revolutionary War figures while the words “Patriots vs. Loyalist” flash across the screen. There is a brief black and white illustration of British and American troops fighting, and then the video switches to modern fifth grade students dressed up as either Patriots or Loyalists. The Patriots wave American flags and the British wave the flag of Great Britain. The debate begins with students portraying people from the Revolutionary War period such as Governor Hutchinson, Benjamin Franklin, Jonathan Boucher, Mercy Otis Warren, Lord Dunmore, and Samuel Adams. Each figure gives a brief speech about their position and students in the audience portraying the people from the opposing side ask them questions. Each person who speaks has either the flag of Great Britain or the flag of the thirteen original U.S. colonies behind them, and also a Don’t Tread on Me flag with a snake. The video ends with a tan Don’t Tread on Me flag blowing and then credits that look like film credits listing all of the students in the debate.

 

Why This Is a Quality Resource:

This video is a quality resource for upper-elementary age students because it is a lesson on the Revolutionary War created by their peers that can inspire them to learn more about the Revolutionary War and to present what they have learned creatively.  The video helps students to see both the Patriot and Loyalists points of view from the war and teaches students how to compare two opposing viewpoints. The video is a good visual lesson because it includes students dressing in the fashion of the time period and waving flags of the time period. The dialogue used by the children in the video is modern American English, so the video is easy for students to follow. The dialogue is simple and also engaging. The video is brief and entertaining so it can easily hold the interest of students. It’s a great resource for teachers to use for reluctant readers or simply as an entertaining visual resource.

 

Kerry Darling

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Women in the Revolution

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Summary:

The Women in Revolution page was created by students at Pontantico Hills School in Sleepy Hollow, New York. The main page briefly shares in three paragraphs that women played an important role in the war. It lists some of the important things women did during the war and also briefly describes the roles of Deborah Sampson and Lydia Darragh. The page includes links to biographies for Deborah Sampson, Betsy Ross, Phillis Wheatley, Nancy Morgan Hart, Molly Pitcher, and Abigail Adams. Each biography briefly describes the woman’s life and her role in the war and also includes a drawing of the woman.

 

Why This Is a Quality Resource:

It is a quality resource because it teaches students about the role of important women in Revolutionary War, something that is sometimes overlooked in history classes. The biography of each woman consists of no more than three paragraphs so the information is not overwhelming to reluctant readers. The biographies include facts that students will find interesting such as Deborah Sampson fighting in the war disguised as a man and Nancy Morgan Hart who defended her home against the British. Both the biographies and illustrations were done by students, so the website is appealing to others students both textually and visually. Seeing work presented by other students can be inspiring to their peers and encourage them to learn more about women from the Revolutionary War on their own.

 

Kerry Darling

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1600s-1800s: Enlightenment and the Revolution

1600s-1800s: Enlightenment and the Revolution | American Revolution | Scoop.it
Do we need kings? Can people govern themselves? What rights do we all have? Can science and understanding uplift all of humanity?

This topic lays the foundation for our modern thinking about the world. From democratic revolutions to the establishment of empires backed by industrial power.
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Lisa Gatzen

 

Summary

 

Kahn Academy created a series about the Declaration of Independence. There are six videos and one quiz. Each video is under 13 minutes. They are presented by Walter Isaacson, author of Benjamin Franklin: An American Life, as he talks to Sal Kahn about the Declaration of Independence. The series begins with background information and introduction Declaration of Independence. In the first four videos the first two paragraphs of the final version of the Declaration of Independence is studied. Isaacson and Kahn explain the text so that everyone can understand it and why it is so important. The fifth video looks at the first draft of the Declaration of Independence. They explain why some of the changes were made and why their choice of wording is so important. Last of the videos is the Birth of the U.S. Constitution which reviews how our Constitution came to be. The quiz is a series of multiple choice and true/false questions.

 

Review

 

The Kahn Academy series on the Declaration of Independence is a fantastic resource for anyone interested in the American Revolution. It provides an in-depth look at one of our country’s most important documents. Walter Isaacson and Sal Kahn break down the first two paragraphs and discuss why they are so important and why they are worded in that specific way. I really liked the conversational casual tone that the video has. It makes the viewer feel as though they are on the same level as the presenters. The information is not dumbed-down; it is reworded so that students can really understand this important document. I also like the fact that it is broken down into smaller segments,  so that it is not an overwhelming amount of information presented in one long lecture. 

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Liberty's Kids

Liberty's Kids | American Revolution | Scoop.it
Welcome to the companion site for Liberty's Kids, an animated adventure television series for children ages 8-14, about three kids who, by working as reporters for Ben Franklin, bring to life the american revolution.
Student SLIS's insight:

Lisa Gatzen

 

Summary

 

The Liberty’s Kids website is a companion to the Liberty’s Kids TV show. Although the show is no longer airing on TV, students can watch the videos on YouTube. Liberty’s Kids is aimed at students age 8-14. Through the eyes of two young apprentice reporters students will go on adventures in search of the real stories of the American Revolution. The website features games, behind-the-scene information about the show, an archive, e-cards, Liberty News and information for parents and teachers. Students can learn about people, place and events that took during the American Revolution. They can even illustrate create their own newspaper. The goals of the website are to teach kids about American history through interactive games that expose young people to the diverse characters, events and issues that shaped the Unites States, participate in multimedia storytelling activities, and explore historical information.

 

Review

 

I think that the Liberty’s Kids website is a great tool for kids to learn about the American Revolution. It’s fun and it doesn’t make history overwhelming. I really like the section about the objects from the 1700’s. I think that is such a fun thing to include. Typically there is talk of battles, the Boston Tea Party, and taxation. Bringing objects like a wax seal, inkwell and quill into the learning experience help kids visualize what life was like in the 1700’s. I also think that a great feature of the website is the Now & Then section. The short videos compare life in the 1700’s to life today, with examples like a journey from New York to France today would take 6 hours by plane, in the 18th century it took 2 months by ship. The only drawback of the website is that the TV episodes are not available on the website. A student would have to look up the episode in the guide then go to YouTube to view it. 

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American Revolution - Kids Konnect

American Revolution - Kids Konnect | American Revolution | Scoop.it
KidsKonnect has kids homework and educational help - a safe Internet gateway for kids created & maintained by educators. KidsKonnect links to a variety of sites on different curriculums and interests.
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Summary:

This website has a list of 10 fast facts about the American Revolution and an extensive list of links to more kid friendly Web content on the subject. Amazingly only one of the 32 links is broken.

 

Applicable NH State Social Studies Standards Grades 5-6:

 

SS:CV:6:1.2: Identify the core ideals and principles of American government by citing documents, e.g., the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, or the Bill of Rights. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:CV:6:3.2: Describe ways in which countries interact with each other culturally, economically, diplomatically, or militarily. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, F: Global Transformation)

SS:CV:6:3.3: Discuss the reasons for conflicts between and among countries and peoples, e.g. , natural resources or religion. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, D: Material Wants and Needs, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:HI:6:1.1: Explain how and why people have developed forms of self-government, e.g., the Mayflower Compact or the Iroquois League. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:WH:6:1.1: Describe different types of political systems created by people, e.g., the tribe, the empire or the nation-state. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:WH:6:1.2: Explore the use and abuse of power. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, F: Global Transformation, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

 

Why this is a Quality Resource:

This site has minimal content of its own, but the long list of links provided make it a good resource for more material. It is useful as a pathfinder for locating in depth information on the American Revolution in general, or on a specific subtopic, such as the Boston Tea Party or Paul Revere’s Ride. 

 

Dawn Hall

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The American Revolution from Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

The American Revolution from Colonial Williamsburg Foundation | American Revolution | Scoop.it
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This is a comprehensive source including various interesting items and materials on almost every aspect of the American Revolution, created by the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. This website leads readers to “explore the causes, character, and consequences” of the American Revolution. This journey of exploration is organized into the website’s four major sections along historical timeline: “EMPIRE & NATIONS (1750-1764)”, “ROADS TO REVOLUTION (1764-1775)”, “WAR & UP HEAVAL (1776-1783)”, and “CONTINUING REVOLUTIONS (1784-1800)”. Furthermore, the website also provides nice theme collections of materials, including: “PEOPLE” section for learning more about key characters involved in the revolution, the “MULTIMEDIA” section collecting a series of nicely made podcasts on varied interesting topics, as well as the “COLLECTIONS” section showing great pictures of objects (like paintings, prints, clothing, weapons, etc) to give a more concrete idea of the life during the revolutionary time. The contents mainly consist of fine images together with well-prepared informative text descriptions, all suitable for casual reading as well as for researching needs of school. 

 

The materials of this (slightly advanced) source are excellent for use in topical research projects as well as writing assignments related to American Revolution (at the 5th grade level or up) that can address a number of standards from “History-Social Science Content Standards for California Public Schools”, including: “5.4 Students understand the political, religious, social, and economic institutions that evolved in the colonial era”; “5.5 Students explain the causes of the American Revolution”; “5.6 Students understand the course and consequences of the American Revolution”; “5.7 Students describe the people and events associated with the development of the U.S. Constitution and analyze the Constitution’s significance as the foundation of the American republic”.

 

Overall this is a very high quality, original and authoritative source on the subject of American Revolution. All pictures are of very high quality and many of them are first-hand, with convenient zoom functions. They all come with informative descriptions written by authoritative professionals on the subject, and some of them have very interesting podcasts available for watching that are prepared by the professionals explaining their origin, value, pertinent history, etc. The various materials are very well organized into an intervening information network: each content page has its right side column with links to “RELATED PAGES”, “RELATED PEOPLE”, “RELATED OBJECTS”, as well as “RELATED WEBSITES”. All contents are accurate and very informative. They are also accessible to higher-grade elementary school students and are very valuable materials for developing lesson plans and projects/assignments by schoolteachers. 

 

Yi Jiang

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Revolutionary War WebQuest

Welcome to your Revolutionary War WebQuest! The American Revolution was the first time in history a colony had successfully rebelled against its ruling country and gained independence. There were...
Student SLIS's insight:

Revolutionary War WebQuest is a fascinating webquest focusing on major events of the Revolutionary War including Lexington and Concord, Bunker Hill, Valley Forge, and Yorktown. The journey includes four tasks: research, evaluation, writing a persuasive essay, and creating a visual representation. An overarching question that guides the student is “How did this event influence the outcome of the Revolutionary War?” The links included in the research portion include The American Revolution.org and History.com. There is a note taking worksheet included as a download, as well as rubrics for the persuasive essay and visual representation. The evaluation component includes a link to an online quiz about the American Revolution that allows the students’ results to be printed out.

 

This is a quality resource because it is neatly laid out and the content is focused. The quest does not delve into every issue relating to the American Revolution, which makes it less confusing for 4th-5th graders to stay on task. The tasks are minimal and clearly defined. Help is provided for writing the persuasive essay; rubrics are provided for the projects which helps to make the task more clear. The quest is written so that students can work independently with everything that they need provided for them. The links are reliable in that they work and the sites are reliable and accurate. The webquest also allows for creativity, adding the element of fun in the midst of research.

 

This site connects with Wyoming Social Studies Content Standards:

SS5.1.3 Understand the basic origins of the United States Constitution (e.g., Declaration of Independence).

SS5.4.1 Describe how small changes can lead to big changes (cause and effect)(e.g., discovery of electricity).

SS5.6.1 Use various media resources in order to address a question or solve a problem.

 

Paige Bredenkamp

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American Revolution Podcast from: Great Moments in History by John G. Stockmyer on Podiobooks.com

American Revolution Podcast from: Great Moments in History by John G. Stockmyer on Podiobooks.com | American Revolution | Scoop.it
Great Moments in History is a collection of ten momentous events in World and American history, covered by live, on-the-spot newscasters. These are "first-hand" dramatizations enhanced by full-range, professional sound effects. Experience real historic events as they happen: - Charge with the Athenians at Marathon; ...
Student SLIS's insight:

This podcast is one among a series of ten recordings on ten selected momentous events in our worldwide history. These recordings, mimicking live coverage by on-the-spot newscasters and enhanced by expert-generated special sound effects. The whole series used to be only available as albums and cassette tapes, rather popular in schools since the early 1970's. It has now been digitalized as podcasts and available at this web page hosted podiobooks.com. The Episode 9 of this series, titled "Victor and Vanquished" and lasting 29 minutes, tells the dramatic story of the American Revolution, reviewing the origin and developments of this long struggle for national independence and culminating in the Battle of Yorktown. The audience will hear the "mock-up voices" of Washington, Burgoyne, Von Steuben, Clinton, DeGrasse and Cornwallis. The music, the background firearm sounds, and other effects are quite amusing.

 

Various pieces from this sound recording can be readily adapted and used for classroom instructions on varied specific sub-topics of the American Revolution, supporting the following standards from “History-Social Science Content Standards for California Public Schools”: “5.5 Students explain the causes of the American Revolution”; “5.6 Students understand the course and consequences of the American Revolution”; “5.7 Students describe the people and events associated with the development of the U.S. Constitution and analyze the Constitution’s significance as the foundation of the American republic”.

 

This very nice podcast is quite a unique and quality audio source that gives audience the unparalleled experiences via "first-hand dramatizations" of the grand historical event and weaving in many facts and key figures of the American Revolution. Initially developed for educational purpose, it has built in many children-friendly and attracting tastes, and is an excellent source of learning for formal classroom as well as for children’s self entertainment. As the web page says, it leads the audience to “experience “real” historical events as they happen”. 

 

Yi Jiang

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TV: Liberty`s Kids [DiC] - YouTube

TV: Liberty`s Kids [DiC] - YouTube | American Revolution | Scoop.it
LibertysKidsTV Watch full episodes of Liberty`s Kids! ▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀ DESCRIPTION ▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀▄▀ Liberty`s Kids (Est. 1776) Re...
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This YouTube fun channel presents the animated TV series "Liberty's Kids", an educational historical fiction. Initially aired on PBS Kids from September 2002 to April 2003, this 40-episode (with roughly 30 minutes per each) cartoon show aims to tell the audience about the origin of the America and to bring them through the historical formation of this free country. Targeting particularly at young children, the stories depict historical characters (such as Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, etc) with young people characters in dramas surrounding some of the most notable events during the American Revolution for the period between Boston Tea Party and the Constitutional Convention. The YouTube channel linked here has a collection of all the episodes of Liberty's Kids that are conveniently listed for browsing and finding. The opening and ending theme songs are also included.

 

This animation show series can serve as very good supplementary materials that help meeting with the following standards from “History-Social Science Content Standards for California Public Schools”: “5.5 Students explain the causes of the American Revolution”; “5.6 Students understand the course and consequences of the American Revolution”; "5.7 Students describe the people and events associated with the development of the U.S. Constitution and analyze the Constitution’s significance as the foundation of the American republic”; “5.8 Students trace the colonization, immigration, and settlement patterns of the American people from 1789 to the mid-1800s, with emphasis on the role of economic incentives, effects of the physical and political geography, and transportation systems”.

 

This is a high quality visual source that is rich in educational merits as well as entertaining features. It appeals well to young children’s interest and attention, and provides an enjoyable and lighthearted way to deliver knowledge and understanding about the American Revolution. Compared with many other online places also hosting some of the episodes from this series, an added valuable feature of the present listing lies in that it contains a complete collection of all episodes and nothing else.  

 

Yi Jiang

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