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American Innovation
Mostly things Made in the USA, with some exceptions made for stuff designed or invented here.
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The Weatherman Is Not a Moron

The Weatherman Is Not a Moron | American Innovation | Scoop.it

by Nate Silver

 

From the inside, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction looked like a cross between a submarine command center and a Goldman Sachs trading floor. Twenty minutes outside Washington, it consisted mainly of sleek workstations manned by meteorologists working an armada of flat-screen monitors with maps of every conceivable type of weather data for every corner of the country. The center is part of the National Weather Service, which Ulysses S. Grant created under the War Department. Even now, it remains true to those roots. Many of its meteorologists have a background in the armed services, and virtually all speak with the precision of former officers.

 

They also seem to possess a high-frequency-trader’s skill for managing risk. Expert meteorologists are forced to arbitrage a torrent of information to make their predictions as accurate as possible. After receiving weather forecasts generated by supercomputers, they interpret and parse them by, among other things, comparing them with various conflicting models or what their colleagues are seeing in the field or what they already know about certain weather patterns — or, often, all of the above. From station to station, I watched as meteorologists sifted through numbers and called other forecasters to compare notes, while trading instant messages about matters like whether the chance of rain in Tucson should be 10 or 20 percent. As the information continued to flow in, I watched them draw on their maps with light pens, painstakingly adjusting the contours of temperature gradients produced by the computers — 15 miles westward over the Mississippi Delta or 30 miles northward into Lake Erie — in order to bring them one step closer to accuracy.

 

These meteorologists are dealing with a small fraction of the 2.5 quintillion bytes of information that, I.B.M. estimates, we generate each day. That’s the equivalent of the entire printed collection of the Library of Congress about three times per second. Google now accesses more than 20 billion Web pages a day; the processing speed of an iPad rivals that of last generation’s most powerful supercomputers. All that information ought to help us plan our lives and profitably predict the world’s course. In 2008, Chris Anderson, the editor of Wired magazine, wrote optimistically of the era of Big Data. So voluminous were our databases and so powerful were our computers, he claimed, that there was no longer much need for theory, or even the scientific method. At the time, it was hard to disagree.

 

But if prediction is the truest way to put our information to the test, we have not scored well. In November 2007, economists in the Survey of Professional Forecasters — examining some 45,000 economic-data series — foresaw less than a 1-in-500 chance of an economic meltdown as severe as the one that would begin one month later. Attempts to predict earthquakes have continued to envisage disasters that never happened and failed to prepare us for those, like the 2011 disaster in Japan, that did.

 

The one area in which our predictions are making extraordinary progress, however, is perhaps the most unlikely field. Jim Hoke, a director with 32 years experience at the National Weather Service, has heard all the jokes about weather forecasting, like Larry David’s jab on “Curb Your Enthusiasm” that weathermen merely forecast rain to keep everyone else off the golf course. And to be sure, these slick-haired and/or short-skirted local weather forecasters are sometimes wrong. A study of TV meteorologists in Kansas City found that when they said there was a 100 percent chance of rain, it failed to rain at all one-third of the time.

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Hone for iPhone 4S: Never Lose Your Keys Again

Hone is a Bluetooth 4.0 device for your iPhone 4S that helps you find your keys - and it's made in the USA.
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Are you ready for ‘Made in the World’?

Are you ready for ‘Made in the World’? | American Innovation | Scoop.it

The World Trade Organization is moving closer to eliminating country-of-origin labels and replacing them with “Made in the World” initiative labels because they say we need to “reduce public opposition to free trade” and “re-engineer global governance.”

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MIT’s Freaky Non-Stick Coating Keeps Ketchup Flowing

MIT’s Freaky Non-Stick Coating Keeps Ketchup Flowing | American Innovation | Scoop.it
When it comes to those last globs of ketchup inevitably stuck to every bottle of Heinz, most people either violently shake the container in hopes of eking out another drop or two, or perform the "secret" trick: smacking the "57" logo on the...
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Flint and Tinder: Premium Men's Underwear

Luxuriously rugged yet refined Premium Men’s Underwear; Sparking a revolution in American Manufacturing the old fashioned way.  Made in the USA.

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The One Item in My Closet Made in the USA

The One Item in My Closet Made in the USA | American Innovation | Scoop.it

by TJ Holmes

 

I spent part of my weekend going through my closet, trying to find any item that was “made in the USA.” I found one.

 

(I’ll tell you which one in a moment.)

 

Given the recent furor over the USA Olympic team wearing Ralph Lauren-designed apparel that was made in China, I started by checking all of my Ralph Lauren gear. Sure enough, it was all made in China, India, Indonesia, Bolivia, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka. My Gap gear: made in India. Express: India, Taiwan, and Vietnam. American Eagle: China and Bangladesh. True Religion (shirts): India. Lucky Brand (shirts): China. Michael Kors: Indonesia. These are all American companies. Even my cowboy boots, designed by the American company Ariat, were made in China, and my Chuck Taylor’s were made in Indonesia. Chuck Taylor’s!

 

Reactions to the Team USA uniforms being made in China have ranged from strange to silly, with some members of Congress leading the way. The Senate majority leader said the uniforms should be put in a big pile and burned. Several other senators plan to introduce the “Team USA Made in America Act of 2012″ to require our Olympic team’s uniforms be made in the U.S. One senator said through a press release that the “last thing the U.S. Olympic Committee should be doing is depriving American workers of much needed jobs.” Then, there’s Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio who wrote a letter to the USOC suggesting that the uniforms could be made at the Hugo Boss plant in his home state. That way the uniforms would be made in America by Americans. One note about Hugo Boss: it’s a German company whose founder was a member of the Nazi party and used slave labor to help produce uniforms for German soldiers and the Hitler Youth during WWII. (http://tinyurl.com/3rgvzua) Also, the majority owner of Hugo Boss is a British firm. Is Hugo Boss really a better option for our Olympic team than Ralph Lauren?

 

Our politicians are doing us a disservice … again. But you already knew that judging by the latest Gallup poll that puts the approval rating for Congress at 16%. This time, they’re fanning outrage (and trying to score political points) by appealing to our patriotism and our fears about “big, bad China.” They would be doing us a favor by being straight with us, but the truth usually doesn’t win you any political points, and it doesn’t sound so patriotic: almost every item of clothing that Americans buy is made overseas, and part of the reason is that we just can’t compete with the cheap labor available in some countries.

 

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average hourly wage for a factory worker in China is $1.36. In the Phillipines, it’s $1.41. For a U.S. worker, it’s $23.32. The result of the disparity is that 98% of the clothing and 99% of the footwear purchased by Americans were made somewhere other than the U.S., according to the American Apparel and Footwear Association.

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YouLobby Campaigns - Innovative new way to lobby your goverment

YouLobby Campaigns - Innovative new way to lobby your goverment | American Innovation | Scoop.it

YouLobby is reinventing democracy! ....... one campaign at a time.


YouLobby was created to help you and others like you unite to hire a lobbyist and make your voice heard.


Our service empowers you with the ability to create, promote, share and fund your unique ideas about how to affect change in America. Whatever the issue.... healthcare, the environment, commerce, energy or education.....YouLobby is a bipartisan, transparent service that helps you influence government.

 

Every YouLobby campaign is started by someone just like you. Start or contribute to a campaign today!

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Elphi: The Smart Plug for iPhone and Android

Elphi: Take control of your world. It's as easy as downloading an app.

Neat idea.  Not sure where it will be manufactured but it's a pretty innovative idea. 

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Low-flow 1.5 gpm shower heads that don't feel like low flow showerheads

Low-flow 1.5 gpm shower heads that don't feel like low flow showerheads | American Innovation | Scoop.it
Low flow, high performance shower heads that deliver a drenching, feel-good spray at just 1.5 gpm.
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American Made Blue Jeans | Bullet Blues Custom Apparel | www.bulletbluesca.com

American Made Blue Jeans | Bullet Blues Custom Apparel | www.bulletbluesca.com | American Innovation | Scoop.it
Get your American made blue jeans at Bullet Blues custom apparel. We offer top quality clothing made from American fabrics for both men and women.
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