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Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education!

The Urban Electorate

The Urban Electorate | American Government |

"Why Republicans Can't Afford to Concede the City Vote Ever Again."


Not trying to make a political statement, just bringing the geography into an analysis of the political landscape: the United States is an urban country and any political party hoping to win a national election must capture at least some of the major metropolitan areas of the country. That isn't ideological; that's simple urban geography and demographics making it's way into national politics.  "The math of assuming that the cities will go to Democrats is just a losing game going forward for Republicans."

Via Seth Dixon
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 2:23 PM

Republicans in American can't afford to lose metropolitan areas, yet don't have the greatest pull in these areas making it an uphill battle. The metropolitan vote is important to US elections. The functional region of urban areas make ideas move faster and come together, making it ideal for political gains.

Miles Gibson's curator insight, February 11, 6:46 PM
Unit 4 political geography
This picture explains how political development has created unbalanced geographical regions. In the U.S. today as the districts concede towards a less republican nation the Democrats take a more key aggressive way forward toward political dominance.
This article relates to unit 4 because it shows how much politics change and shape political and geographical boundaries. The movement of political parties changes the shape of the people we deal with today and the landscape of society overall.
Chris Plummer's curator insight, March 23, 8:39 PM

Summary- This map shows the political geography between political parties.(Democrats and Republicans.) This map shows the regions and redrawing of districts to favor one party. It is evident that republican districts are very small to gain more votes in the city votes for president to gain a strategic advantage. The article states that the small districts come into play an "uneven city vote" for republicans. 


Insight- In parts of Unit 4, we study the effect of redrawing voting districts to gain a political advantage.(Gerrymandering). This map shows how the size and drawing of districts can effect a vote through geographic boundaries. The democratic districts are larger counting for less votes, While the creation of the smaller districts allows for more votes for republicans in the city vote. 



Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education!

Census count finds decreasing white population in 15 states

Census count finds decreasing white population in 15 states | American Government |
Non-Hispanic whites make up a dwindling share of the nation’s population, as their numbers drop in the Northeast and Midwest and grow slowly in the South and West.


A while back we looked at the changing demographics of black America, now it's time to look at the changes in white America. Why is this happening? What economic, cultural, demographic and political factors contribute to this pattern? What push factors and pull factors are at work?


Also, look at the interactive graphic, with mappable census data from the last 30 years, aggregated at the county level, or even block level. Link at:

Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education!

Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns

Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns | American Government |

A refugee is a person who has been pushed away from their homeland and seeks refuge in another place. The United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) provides a more narrow definition of a refugee as someone who flees their home country due to a “well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.”

As Neal Lineback notes in this Geography in the News post, not all refugees are covered by this definition.  Environmental refugees have been forced to leave their homes beause of soil degradation, deserticfication, flooding, drought, climate change and other environmental factors. 

Tags: environment, environment depend, migration, unit 2 population.

Via Seth Dixon
jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:47 AM

 Refugees are found in a large percent of Earth’s surface. Some people chose to migrate, while others are forced. Some leave their home in order to get away from their country, for example due to a war. Many flee to nearby countries and are afraid to return to their hometown because they are frightened of what might happen if they go back. Another reason many refugees leave their country is due to environmental problems and the people cannot afford to live in that country.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, October 17, 2014 1:31 PM

I felt like this article was very relevant to our Unit 2, Population. We have talked about refugees and migration in a great deal and I thought this map was a good visual. I also liked the information it provided about what refugees really are and that they are really a part of the world migration pattern.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:31 PM

Refugees are often thought of as those with the "refugee problems" they face, the problems they create and the constant struggle they possess of never being able to go home for the political/religious dispute in their homeland.  

However this articles goes into depth of the definition of a refugee and furthermore focuses on the topic of "environmental refugees' who are forced to get up and leave their land due to soul degradation, flooding, etc. - UNIT 2

Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education!

Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.


This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.


Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.

Via Seth Dixon
Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.