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Why Are States So Red and Blue?

Why Are States So Red and Blue? | American Government | Scoop.it
Theories about our right-wing and left-wing mind-sets don't explain why they are tied to geography.

 

While not endorsing all the cultural assumptions in the article, this is still an interesting exploration into expalining why distinct places are are politically aligned with particular parties. 

 

Questions to ponder: What portions of the author's argument do you agree (or disagree) with?  What do you see as the reasons behind the spatial distributions of "blue" and "red" in the United States? 

 

Tags: political, place, USA, culture, unit 4 political.


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BraydenJulietteGeo's comment, November 21, 2013 1:26 PM
this is a extremely interesting article on how certain portions of our country are know for voting for certain political party's during presidential elections. We have seen this political pattern all through our history, and can now almost always guess what states will be red or blue when it comes time for elections. Because this talks about political party's I have put this under political
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Election Results Map

Election Results Map | American Government | Scoop.it
Live election results from The Huffington Post. Romney vs. Obama, Senate, House and ballot measures.

 

This is one of many election maps that I am continually refreshing.  When I lived in California I would always try to stay up for the results--now that I'm on the East Coast I don't think that is going to happen tonight (FYI: I've refreshed this map too many times to count). 


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Jeff F's comment, November 9, 2012 4:41 PM
I projected this map for President Obama a few months ago. After his first debate disaster I said Florida would probably go to Romney as well.
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The Urban Electorate

The Urban Electorate | American Government | Scoop.it

"Why Republicans Can't Afford to Concede the City Vote Ever Again."

 

Not trying to make a political statement, just bringing the geography into an analysis of the political landscape: the United States is an urban country and any political party hoping to win a national election must capture at least some of the major metropolitan areas of the country. That isn't ideological; that's simple urban geography and demographics making it's way into national politics.  "The math of assuming that the cities will go to Democrats is just a losing game going forward for Republicans."


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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 2:23 PM

Republicans in American can't afford to lose metropolitan areas, yet don't have the greatest pull in these areas making it an uphill battle. The metropolitan vote is important to US elections. The functional region of urban areas make ideas move faster and come together, making it ideal for political gains.

Miles Gibson's curator insight, February 11, 2015 6:46 PM
Unit 4 political geography
This picture explains how political development has created unbalanced geographical regions. In the U.S. today as the districts concede towards a less republican nation the Democrats take a more key aggressive way forward toward political dominance.
This article relates to unit 4 because it shows how much politics change and shape political and geographical boundaries. The movement of political parties changes the shape of the people we deal with today and the landscape of society overall.
Chris Plummer's curator insight, March 23, 2015 8:39 PM

Summary- This map shows the political geography between political parties.(Democrats and Republicans.) This map shows the regions and redrawing of districts to favor one party. It is evident that republican districts are very small to gain more votes in the city votes for president to gain a strategic advantage. The article states that the small districts come into play an "uneven city vote" for republicans. 

 

Insight- In parts of Unit 4, we study the effect of redrawing voting districts to gain a political advantage.(Gerrymandering). This map shows how the size and drawing of districts can effect a vote through geographic boundaries. The democratic districts are larger counting for less votes, While the creation of the smaller districts allows for more votes for republicans in the city vote. 

 

 

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Changing Face of the US/Mexico Border

Changing Face of the US/Mexico Border | American Government | Scoop.it

This lesson plan was specifically designed with Arizona examples and aligned to the Arizona state standards, but it be easily adapted.  I saw a presentation based on this lesson at the NCGE conference as was incredibly impressed.  Also, you'll note that like this one, there are many other lesson plans freely available on the Arizona Geographic Alliance website.  

 

Tags: K12, borders, political, landscape, migration, unit 4 political.


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oyndrila's comment, October 14, 2012 11:40 AM
I found very useful resources on the website. Thank you for sharing it.
Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an important lesson, especially for those who actually live in Arizona/Mexico and have seen the border itself. Learning about the Arizona/Mexican border is important and shouldn't be left solely to teaching it only in those areas. The maps included in the lesson plan are efficient and could be used in the high school setting.

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2008 Election maps

2008 Election maps | American Government | Scoop.it

Excellent electoral geography maps from the U.S. presidential election of 2008.  What are the major patterns you see?  What do these patterns in say about the politics, culture and demographics about these places?


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The ReDistricting Game

The ReDistricting Game | American Government | Scoop.it

This is an interactive way to teach the importance of the redistricting process.  Mapmakers (and geography) are crucial to the process.  This game shows students how the process can be manipulated and if you understand local demographics and voting patterns, subtle shifts in the district borders can swing elections.  This is a great way to teaching gerrymandering and how political cartography can be.     


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Ressources pour les cours d'anglais's curator insight, February 23, 2014 9:02 AM

J'ai regardé la vidéo de présentation et j'ai eu envie de jouer à ce jeu ! J'ai aimé le graphisme, la musique et la voix du narrateur. J'ai eu envie de continuer et je pense que mes élèves auraient eu également envie d'aller plus loin. Il ne me reste donc plus qu'à le tester !

Alex Rodgers's curator insight, April 22, 1:16 AM
This a great tool to connect to political geography. Interactive learning in my opinion is one of the best ways to learn. This allows for us to better understanding political cartography in a way that is both fun and helpful.
Austin Thompson's curator insight, April 27, 5:33 PM
This game is all about gerrymandering in Political Geography and the objective is to set boundaries for each district so that each has a similar population. This game really shows how difficult gerrymandering is and the process of getting the boundaries accepted.  
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The 9/11 Dilemma: Freedom vs. Security

KH: How has America changed since the attacks of September 11, 2001? We are still struggling to find a balance between saftey and civil liberties. The Patriot Act, prisoners in Guantanamo Bay, interrorgation techniques have all become parts of our lives.

The article asks the questions...

• Can the government listen to our phone conversations and read our  e-mails without warrants?

• Should suspected terrorists at the Guantánamo prison in Cuba have the right to challenge their detention in court?

• How much power does the president have to search for and punish those accused of having terrorist ties?

• Are harsh interrogation techniques ever justified? And at what point do they become torture?

 

Do you remember a time when you could board a plane with friends or family seeing you off from the gate? Do you remember bringing liquids though security? The youth of this country do not.  For more resources on September 11th, check out this scoop.it topic.


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Gerrymandering: What is it?

Gerrymandering: What is it? | American Government | Scoop.it

This page is a quick primer for understanding how the decennial census leads to the incredibly political process of reapportionment of the congressional districts.  It also defines the specific gerrymandering techniques of packing, cracking, hijacking and kidnapping as well as the historical origin of the term.


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Globalization

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?

 

Tags: Globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.


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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 11:39 AM

Globalización Globalization

Altaira Wallquist's curator insight, March 18, 2015 4:47 PM

This article goes in depth to define and describe globalization.  It discusses globalization  through an economical, political, and cultural standpoint.

 

This connects to Unit 1 in that it discusses globalization and things from a global perspective. It all discusses the society we live in today.

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, March 22, 2015 10:18 PM

globalization

This video describes and really breaks down globalization. The video talks about how some countries benefit and some countries don't benefit from globalization. The video also separates globalization into three parts: economic, politics, and culture. It goes over the huge role that technology plays in globalization and covers it well.

This relates to our unit, because globalization is a huge factor in human geography as a whole. It is one of the main factors why our cultures are beginning to intertwine and have things in common.     

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Earth's City Lights

Earth's City Lights | American Government | Scoop.it
NASA's Visible Earth catalog of NASA images and animations of our home planet...

 

This classic image is full of classroom applications.  The first impulse of most students is to note that this image will show us where people live, where the cities are or some other comment that speaks to the magnitude of the population in the white areas.  Let them analyze this for more time, and they'll notice that population isn't the whole story of this image.  A place like India shines, but less brightly than the eastern part of the United States.  I like to point out that South Korea appears to be an island (because North Korea is literally blacked out).  Politics, development, affluence and population information are all embedded in this image.  As with all maps, the more information you have about the place in question (in this case, Earth), the more meaningful information you can extract out of the map. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, worldwide, consumption, poverty, population, spatial, political, regions.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, September 18, 2012 12:35 PM
This image is pretty amazing to see. It shows what parts of the world are more modernized just by the lights seen from space. Looking at the U.S. and Europe, they are lit up very bright because they are richer parts of the world. As you look at places like Africa and some parts of South America, they are shown in darkness due to poorer areas in those regions.
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:07 PM
I was impressed with the explanation of this picture especially for the simple fact that I thought it was a picture that depicted the population of certain areas of each country. Places like Africa, Brazil, areas of Mexico, and Southern US are not lit because of the areas of forest, desert and less population. Very nice picture. -Michelle Carvajal-
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The Real World at Night

The Real World at Night | American Government | Scoop.it

Earlier I have posted the classic image of "Earth Lights at Night," and discussed the classroom uses of the image.  This cartogram helps take that analysis one step further.  This cartogram helps students to visualize the magnitude of population (with the cartogram adjusting area for population) and then to see the patterns of energy use, global consumption and urbanization with in a new light. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, worldwide, consumption, poverty, population, spatial, political, regions.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 1, 2012 11:29 AM
This map is obviously not the actual size of countries, but it is in a way. The populations of China and India are so great compared to the rest of the world and this map shows that.
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Geographic Analysis of 2012 Presidential Election

Geographer Andy Baker provides an excellent spatial analysis of the key voting patterns that will shape the 2012 presidential election in the United States.

 

Tags: political, statistics, spatial, regions, USA.


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 3:24 PM
This video was very helpful for me because the speaker clearly gave visual examples of the many topics that can steer certain voters in the U.S. to vote a certain way, during election time. It helped me better interpret political data, since I am a visual learner.
Betty Denise's comment, October 15, 2012 6:19 AM
RT the comment !
Frank Fenn's comment, March 2, 2013 2:09 AM
I used this during the Political Unit. I find that 9th graders know nothing about politics beyond what concerns them at the moment. Stretching their brain back to when they were 7 helps build the political foundations of the future!
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Exit polls 2012: How votes are shifting

Exit polls 2012: How votes are shifting | American Government | Scoop.it
See how much voter groups have shifted in the 2012 exit polls, compared to 2008. Early numbers are preliminary and may change significantly until midday Wednesday, when poll results are finalized.

 

The 2012 election mostly went as predicted (given Virginia and Florida's voting pattern, I'd invite you to re-think the "Where Does the South Begin" or at least to contextualize the political and cultural implications for the defining the vernacular region of "the South").  I'm sure we've all seen the electoral college map, but this great graphic shows the demographic groups voting patterns that produced that map. 


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Puerto Rico endorses US statehood

Puerto Rico endorses US statehood | American Government | Scoop.it
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Puerto Ricans faced a fundamental question on Election Day: Should they change their ties with the United States?

 

Lost in the election day enthusiasm throught much of the United Statees was coverage about Puerto Rico.  A 'non-binding referendum' was on the ballot to reconsider the 114-relationship with the United States as a territory.  54% voted for a change, while 46% favored the status quo.  The second question was asking how to change that relationship: 61% voted for statehood, 33% endorsed a sovereign free association, and 5% for independence.  President Obama has gone on record stating that he'll support the will of a clear majority.  We'll see what this means, but we are a lot closer to 51 states than we've ever been before.  For more information, see Matt Rosenberg's assessment.

 

Tags: USA, political, states, autonomy. 


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Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 2014 1:45 PM

Page not found for some reason.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 10:13 AM

if Puerto Ricans do decide to become a full American state then it will be a boon for both groups. the fact that this has happened now reflects a surprising change, but they would make a welcome addition to the us.

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Redistricting Results

Redistricting Results | American Government | Scoop.it

While this cartoon is flippant, the attached Washington Post article is not.  In the culumative congressional voting, Democrats have more votes but won fewer seats than the Republicans.  Many are starting to question the redistricting process after the 2010 census. 

  

Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census.


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Landon Conner's curator insight, February 11, 2016 8:34 AM

Democrats have won the popular vote roughly. But the Republicans are set to have the secone biggest house majority in 60 years according to the article. Republicans were favored in more house districts compared to democrats. Most of this is because democrats are in urban areas. LDC

Brealyn Holley's curator insight, February 11, 2016 8:53 AM

Since the redistricting has to do with the Republicans, which they have taken over more seats, but the Democrats have won the poll by a numerous number. You could see this from either side. A republican sees this as a good thing and the democrats would see this as a bad thing for them. ~BH

Cohen Adkins's curator insight, February 23, 2016 5:32 PM

Gerrymandering can cause problems in the political word.Not only can it make unfair elections but it can cause voters to become frustrated at how even though one region has more votes,the region is then seperated where its splitting the majority in half so they dont have the majority vote anymore. -C.A

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Systems of Government by Country

Systems of Government by Country | American Government | Scoop.it
This map shows Systems of Government in the World.

 

This is an excellent tool for comparing political institutions around the world and analyzing regional difference between political systems at a global scale. 


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Redistricting

This video is a good primer to show before the ReDistricting Game (http://www.scoop.it/t/geography-education/p/2214122954/the-redistricting-game ).


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Delainee Alysse Bushey's curator insight, April 27, 5:00 PM
This video relates to what we are talking about in class, political geography, because it talks about gerrymandering. Gerrymandering deals with political geography because the people who make the district lines are politicians and district lines deals with geography. My opinion on this is that people use redistricting for their own good, so it can benefit them in the long run.
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Can a Communist Party Nurture a Modern Capitalist System?

Can a Communist Party Nurture a Modern Capitalist System? | American Government | Scoop.it

"After growing by leaps and bounds for more than three decades, China’s economic growth has come to a halt, falling from around 12 percent in the second quarter of 2006 to 7.6 percent in the second quarter of 2012. Export-dependent manufacturing sector has been hard hit. The June HSBC Flash Purchasing Managers Index hit a seven-month low of 48.1, down from a final reading of 48.4 in May, the eighth consecutive month that the index has been below 50—the contraction threshold. Is this just a temporary pause, caused by a prolonged slow-down in the world economy or something more serious?"


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Graham Mulligan's comment, March 14, 2013 12:32 PM
I think the flag icon needs to be changed.
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Arms Trade

Arms Trade | American Government | Scoop.it

This interactive requires WebGL (viewable in Chrome).  Even more compelling than the data is the visualization platform. 


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Red State Reads, Blue State Reads

Red State Reads, Blue State Reads | American Government | Scoop.it
What political books are residents of your state reading? A new interactive map from Amazon shows recent book sales broken down by either "red" or "blue" political leanings.

 

I do not think that "book sales" is a surrogate for "projected votes," but this is revealing about the political landscape and especially the marketing of politically partisan materials. 


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England, Britain and the UK

England, Britain and the UK | American Government | Scoop.it

This is the short version of the differences between these interrelated places and terms; the long version is much more complicated than this. 

 

Tags: Europe, political, unit 4 political, states, toponyms.


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James Hobson's curator insight, October 9, 2014 11:05 PM

(Europe topic 7)

Perhaps this "short" version would've been a better starting point for those less familiar with the terminology. :-) And at least this doesn;t have to be edited to include an independent Scotland, which might've sparked a debate about the terms "U.K." and "Great Britain."

Nonetheless, this serves as a great example of the often-overlooked contrast between physical and political boundaries. Perhaps a simpler example would be "the Americas" (physical) and "the United States of America" (political).

Perhaps one peculiarity which I can relate to this example is that of "Bristol County", a term used seemingly interchangeably between all towns in east-central Rhode Island and nearby Massachusetts. Though currently these are 2 separate counties in 2 different states which just happen to bear the same name, realizing the history behind all of these types of examples can offer further insight into the geographic contexts (physical, political, personal, etc.)

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 1:52 PM

Its no wonder people often get confused when referencing the UK, Britain Isles and Great Britain. I sometimes struggle with the terms and being able to locate where each of the 5 countries fall under. This diagram does a good job at pinpointing where each of the 5 countries on the eastern border of Europe lies.Great Britain consist of Scotland, England, and Wales. The United Kingdom consist of Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland, While Ireland consist of the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. And finally the British Isles consisting of all the countries within. This raises the question, if Northern Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom, is their identity shared also with the Republic of Ireland?

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 3:20 PM

To be honest here, this map clarifies a lot of things for myself. I never understood what the British Isles were compares to the UK, Great Britain and England. People used to confuse me all the time and they would refer to England as the UK or Great Britain. Now, I understand England is it's own country and it is part of the UK which is a combination of countries, where as Great Britain is just Three areas, which also include England in it. Now, I fully understand the concept of the United Kingdom and Great Britain. . 

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The Geography of the 47%

The Geography of the 47% | American Government | Scoop.it
The states with the highest share of tax non-payers may actually contain the very conservative votes that Romney needs.
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The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State

The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State | American Government | Scoop.it

Not every state is equally impacted by migration, and the demographic profile of migrants is different for every state. This is an online mapping tool to search a large database that can give the user state specific information about the impact of economics and politics based on migration from Latin America and Asia on any given state.

 

Tags: Immigration, unit 2 population, migration, economic, statistics, mapping, political.


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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 26, 2014 12:43 PM

Unit 2 population and migration 

This map shows the population of migrants in certain states and compares them to other states. This demographic specifically highlights Texas and shows its migrant information. Texas has the highest immigrant income out of all of the states. Also Texas has very few naturalized citizens who used to be an immigrant.

This map relates to unit 2 because it shows the illegal immigration. And immigration theories. This proves ravensteins laws correct because it shows how people move a short distance to migrate, knowing that most migrants to America come from Latin America. This map is a great example of ravensteins theories and unit 2