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Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Research Workshop
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Beautiful Maps Show the World's Oceans in Motion

Beautiful Maps Show the World's Oceans in Motion | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
These maps from NASA show ocean currents around the world.


The world's oceans are in constant motion, and this series of maps published by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio helps provide us with a nice illustration of this movement. The maps, which were created at various times in past years, show the many warm and cold ocean currents responsible for transporting water across long distances throughout the world's oceans.


In addition to the ocean currents, you can also see swirly features, known as ocean eddies, on the maps. An ocean eddy is formed when currents sometimes pinch off into sections, creating the circular current. Sometimes significant eddies are given names, according to NOAA.


Below we have selected a few of the maps from NASA's collection, accompanied by a brief explanation of what you are seeing.

In addition to a large-scale view of ocean circulations and eddies across the world, you can also see water temperatures in this image. The orange and red shadings in the middle of the map correspond to the warmer waters in tropics. Cooler waters depicted in green and blue are located north and south of this as you head towards the poles.


Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Suvi Salo, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Jocelyn Stoller
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40 maps that explain the world

40 maps that explain the world | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.

Via Seth Dixon, Ness Crouch
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Terheck's curator insight, January 26, 2014 5:58 AM

Une sélection de 40 cartes qui permettent de mieux comprendre notre monde.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2014 2:30 PM

When looking at this map there area few things that stick out to me and not just the colors. Fistly what I founf interesting was that South America in relation to where we live is quite different. For example, The US economic status is High Class at $12195 or more for most of the East and West Coast and then it is dull in the middle. These facts compared to South America where they are mostly upper middle class at around $3946-12185 and a portion of them are the lower middle class which rings in at around $886-3945.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:39 PM

 On map 33, it shows the religious borders map of the different religions that are occupying certain areas of the Middle East. The area of Baghdad and east is mostly Shiite Islam and west of Baghdad is Sunni Islam. What I found to be most interesting is that even though Jerusalem is surrounded by many different religions they still celebrate Judaism. They are religiously protected by its borders. There is some sign of Sunni Islam being practices within their borders but it is mostly dominated by Judaism. 

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Google introduces new Google Maps feature that allows users to see inside businesses

Google introduces new Google Maps feature that allows users to see inside businesses | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
A new feature inside Google Maps lets users peek inside businesses before visiting them, thanks to panoramic photos shared by the businesses with Google.

 

"These interior business photos on Google Maps give you the feeling of being there, and the comfort of knowing what to expect when you arrive," the company said in a blog post. To see the panoramic photos, first zoom in toward street level -- if you're more than four levels up from the street, it won't work. Click and drag the orange figure known as Pegman over the section of the map you're looking at. Once you do, you'll see orange dots indicating businesses that have submitted panoramas to Google. The company says "thousands" of businesses have submitted photos so far.

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100 Years Of Historical Earthquake Data - Graphical Map

100 Years Of Historical Earthquake Data - Graphical Map | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
This map of all the world's recorded earthquakes between 1898 and 2003 is stunning. As you might expect, it also creates a brilliant outline of the plates of the Earth's crust—especially the infamous "Ring of Fire" around the Pacific Plate.

 

The plate boundaries are amazingly vivid in this geovisualization of the all the earthquakes over  a 105 year span.  How did scientist orginally come up with the theory of plate tectonics?  How did spatial thinking and mapping play a role in that scientific endeavor?


Via Seth Dixon, Martin Daumiller
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Paleomaps and Earth's History - World geography millions of years in the past and in the future

Paleomaps and Earth's History - World geography millions of years in the past and in the future | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Select one of the times from the list on the left and travel through time and check out what the Earth looked liked in the far distant past or what it might look like far into the future. At each stop there is more information about the particular geological time period.

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First satellite with high-resolution public imaging launched on August 13th, 2014

First satellite with high-resolution public imaging launched on August 13th, 2014 | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

WorldView-3, the world’s first multi-payload, super-spectral, high-resolution commercial satellite for earth observations and advanced geospatial solutions, launched into orbit on Aug. 13 aboard an Atlas rocket. Operating at an expected altitude of 617 km, WorldView-3 will have an average revisit time of less than one day and will be capable of collecting up to 680,000 square kilometers of imagery per day. Its data-rich imagery will discover new sources of minerals and fuels, manage forests and farms, and accelerate DigitalGlobe’s exploitation of Geospatial Big Data™ – a living digital inventory of the surface of the Earth.


The data should lead to much nicer imagery in online mapping services from companies like Google and Microsoft (both of which are DigitalGlobe customers), although it's not just cosmetic. Higher-res photos will help track large farms, spot mineral deposits and otherwise deliver a clearer view of our planet that has previously been limited to the government -- don't be surprised if it's easier to spot landmarks on a map without using markers.

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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Via Seth Dixon, Sue Tamani
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:01 AM

It is incredible big, but unfortunately most of the north area is cover by the big Sahara and most of the are is typically unfertilized. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 2015 4:29 PM

As we can see, there's a little overlapping here and some empty spots but it's pretty accurate. The United States and China are in the top 5 largest countries of the world list and they still fit in the 2nd largest continent of the world, Africa. I'd like to see the size comparison between Africa and Russia. I did some research on that and it turns out that Russia is a little over half the size of Africa, maybe the size of the combination of the United States and China.

Anneliese Sjogren's curator insight, December 10, 2015 10:27 PM

I didn't realize how big Africa is before looking at this image. It's really interesting to see how the other countries fit inside of it.

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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


Via Seth Dixon, Martin Daumiller, Sakis Koukouvis
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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

Rescooped by Dr. Stefan Gruenwald from Random Ephemera
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Map of Europe: 1000 AD to Present Day - all in a short VIDEO clip

Map of Europe: 1000 AD to Present Day - all in a short VIDEO clip | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Map of Europe: 1000 AD to present day....watch the march of history in just a few minutes.


Via Daniel House
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