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40 MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses) Providers

40 MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses) Providers | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

The recent emergence of Massive Open Online Courses, commonly known as MOOCs, is revolutionizing the online education world and is having a profound impact on higher education. With the growing adoption of MOOCs, the number of MOOC providers has also increased many folds.  Below is a comprehensive and up-to-date list of MOOC providers; might be helpful to all interested.

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Usein González's curator insight, January 14, 2014 9:51 PM

Una de las nuevas metodologías de aprendizaje colaborativo está tomando fuerza a nivel mundial mi experiencia en estos cursos son muy didacticos, excelentes videos de apoyo y bien documentados.

asli telli's curator insight, January 15, 2014 4:20 AM

list of lists for MOOC...

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Public Lectures - Stephen Hawking: My Life in Physics

Public Lectures - Stephen Hawking: My Life in Physics | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Hawking has given many lectures to the general public. Below are some of the more recent public lectures. Included with these lectures is a Glossary of some of the terms used.

Into a Black Hole (2008): Is it possible to fall in a black hole, and come out in another universe? Can you escape from a black hole once you fall inside? What have we discovered about black holes?

The Origin of the Universe (2005): Why are we here? Where did we come from? The answer generally given was that humans were of comparatively recent origin, because it must have been obvious, even at early times, that the human race was improving in knowledge and technology. So it can't have been around that long, or it would have progressed even more.

Godel and the End of Physics (2002): How far can we go in our search for understanding and knowledge? Will we ever find a complete form of the laws of nature - a set of rules that in principle at least enable us to predict the future to an arbitrary accuracy, knowing the state of the universe at one time? A qualitative understanding of the laws has been the aim of philosophers and scientists, from Aristotle onwards.

Space and Time Warps (1999): In science fiction, space and time warps are a commonplace. They are used for rapid journeys around the galaxy, or for travel through time. But today's science fiction, is often tomorrow's science fact. So what are the chances for space and time warps?

Does God Play Dice (1999): Can predict the future, or is it arbitrary and random? In ancient times, the world must have seemed pretty arbitrary. Disasters such as floods or diseases must have seemed to happen without warning or apparent reason. Primitive people attributed such natural phenomena, to a pantheon of gods and goddesses, who behaved in a capricious and whimsical way. There was no way to predict what they would do, and the only hope was to win favour by gifts or actions.

The Beginning of Time (1996): Has time itself a beginning, and will it have an end? All the evidence seems to indicate, that the universe has not existed forever, but that it had a beginning, about 15 billion years ago. This is probably the most remarkable discovery of modern cosmology. Yet it is now taken for granted. We are not yet certain whether the universe will have an end.

Life in the Universe (1996): Speculations about how life has developed in the universe, and in particular, the development of intelligent life.

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Learning in a digital age: From MOOCs to big data to crowd intelligence

Learning in a digital age: From MOOCs to big data to crowd intelligence | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

From massive open online courses (MOOCs) that are delivered to tens of thousands around the globe to adaptive digital tools that can improve outcomes by providing tailored learning experiences as well as mapping a student’s individual progress at every juncture, technology is transforming the 21st century student.

 

Classrooms haven't changed much in the past few centuries. Students attend class, take notes and do their homework. The teacher lectures and once in a while administers a test. Students get their grades and move on to the next topic. By and large, students—especially the most disadvantaged ones—attend the school or university closest to their home, regardless of its quality.

 

These routines are starting to change. In a small but growing number of schools, students watch lectures online and come to class prepared to tackle assignments and collaborate with teachers and peers. They interact with computer programs that allow them to work at their own pace, regardless of what the rest of the class is doing. Teachers rely on those same programs to grade tests and essays, allowing them to closely track more students at once. And local schools are no longer a pupil's only option. Start-ups and nonprofits make high-quality courses available online to anyone with an Internet connection.

 

What is driving this digital revolution? One factor is that schools and universities are under greater pressure than ever before. More and more students are pursuing higher levels of education at a time when budget-strapped principals and universities cannot hire the staff they need. At the same time, governments and institutions (prodded by employers) are raising standards for what students should know at every stage of school.

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Next-generation of highly-interactive digital ebook as a standard learning tool?

Software developer Mike Matas demos the first full-length interactive book for the iPad -- with clever, swipeable video and graphics and some very cool data visualizations to play with. The book is "Our Choice," Al Gore's sequel to "An Inconvenient Truth."

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133 Lectures about the Foundations of Modern Physics (Stanford Courses - Prof. Leonard Susskind)

133 Lectures about the Foundations of Modern Physics (Stanford Courses - Prof. Leonard Susskind) | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Free video course on Foundations of Modern Physics by Leonard Susskind of Stanford. This Stanford Continuing Studies course is a six-quarter sequence of classes exploring the essential theoretical foundations of modern physics.

 

This Stanford Continuing Studies course is a six-quarter sequence of classes exploring the essential theoretical foundations of modern physics. The topics covered in this course focus on classical mechanics, quantum mechanics, the general and special theories of relativity, electromagnatism, cosmology, black holes and statistical mechanics. While these courses build upon one another, each section of the course also stands on its own, and both individually and collectively they will allow the students to attain the "theoretical minnimum" for thinking intelligently about physics. Quantum theory governs the universe at its most basic level. In the first half of the 20th century physics was turned on its head by the radical discoveriies of Max Planck, Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schroedinger. An entire new logical and mathematical foundation - quantum mechanics - eventually replaced classical physics. This course explores the quantum world, including the particle theory of light, the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, and the Schroedinger Equation. The course is taught by Leonard Susskind, the Felix Bloch Professor of Physics at Stanford University.

 

Here is a comprehensive listing of all lectures from Dr. Susskind:

 

http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=189C0DCE90CB6D81
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA27CEA1B8B27EB67
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5F9D6DB4231291BE
http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=84C10A9CB1D13841
http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=CCD6C043FEC59772
http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=6C8BDEEBA6BDC78D
http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=F363FFF951EC0673
http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=B72416C707D85AB0
http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=888811AA667C942F
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8BCB4981DD1A0108
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA2FDCCBC7956448F
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3E633552E58EB230
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL47F408D36D4CF129
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL701CD168D02FF56F

 

http://glenmartin.wordpress.com/home/leonard-susskinds-online-lectures/

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Carlos Garcia Pando's comment, April 20, 2013 2:37 PM
Thanks for sharing. and Prof. Susskind too.
Tania Gammage's curator insight, May 12, 2013 11:47 PM

Awesome for HSC physics, six week sequence of classes.

Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN's comment, May 13, 2013 6:57 AM
Any thanks, this is the way to go, sharing, sharing, sharing, curls to You
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The future of education eliminates the classroom, because the world is your class

The future of education eliminates the classroom, because the world is your class | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Technology can turn our entire lives into learning experiences via “socialstructed learning,” an aggregation of microlearning experiences drawn from a rich ecology of content and driven not by grades but by social and intrinsic rewards, suggests Marina Gorbis, Executive Director at the Institute for the Future.

 

“Today’s obsession with MOOCs is a reminder of the old forecasting paradigm: In the early stages of technology introduction we try to fit new technologies into existing social structures in ways that have become familiar to us,” she says.

 

What if we could access historical, artistic, demographic, environmental, architectural, and other kinds of information embedded in the real world via augmented reality devices?

 

“This is exactly what a project from USC and UCLA called HyperCities is doing: layering historical information on the actual city terrain. As you walk around with your cell phone, you can point to a site and see what it looked like a century ago, who lived there, what the environment was like.

 

“The Smithsonian’s free iPhone and iPad app, Leafsnap, responds when you take a photo of a tree leaf by instantly searching a growing library of leaf images amassed by the Smithsonian Institution.

 

“We are moving away from the model in which learning is organized around stable, usually hierarchical institutions (schools, colleges, universities) . … Replacing that model is a new system in which learning is best conceived of as a flow, where learning resources are not scarce but widely available, opportunities for learning are abundant, and learners increasingly have the ability to autonomously dip into and out of continuous learning flows.”

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Pedeta Deutscher's comment, May 31, 2013 11:08 PM
How great would this be, technology is truly amazing!
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100 Incredible Lectures from the World's Top Scientists - Best Colleges Online

100 Incredible Lectures from the World's Top Scientists - Best Colleges Online | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Unless you’re enrolled at one of the best online colleges or are an elite member of the science and engineering inner circle, you’re probably left out of most of the exciting research explored by the world’s greatest scientists.

 

But thanks to the Internet and the generosity of many universities and online colleges, you’ve now got access to the cutting edge theories and projects that are changing the world in this list below.

 

If you’re looking for even more amazing lectures, check out our updated list for 2012 with more talks from great minds.

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Hacer Sezer's curator insight, March 11, 2013 12:38 PM

International education will be more economical for the foreign students as the online education spreads around the world and fortified with accreditation issue.

Dmitry Alexeev's curator insight, March 28, 2013 2:03 AM

Wanna sturt learning now? This is a goof point)

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Is college credit for massive open online courses coming?

Is college credit for massive open online courses coming? | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
The American Council on Education (ACE) has announced a wide-ranging research and evaluation effort that will examine the academic potential of massive open online courses (MOOCs).

 

The ACE College Credit Recommendation Service (ACE CREDIT) will evaluate for potential college credit select courses offered by Coursera, a leading provider of massive open online courses (MOOCs).

 

“MOOCs are an intriguing, innovative new approach that holds much promise for engaging students across the country and around the world, as well as for helping colleges and universities broaden their reach,” said ACE President Molly Corbett Broad.

 

Among the questions ACE will address in research undertaken in collaboration with the University of Illinois Springfield’s Center for Online Learning, Research, and Service are to what extent do MOOCs reach low-income young adult and older adult learners, what is the level of satisfaction of students enrolled in MOOCs, and do MOOCs have the potential to help lead to degrees or certificates.

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Video Collection from the First NASA Quantum Future Technologies Conference (2012)

Video Collection from the First NASA Quantum Future Technologies Conference (2012) | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
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The Life on Super-Earth Explanets - Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics [Video Seminar]

Lecture is given by by Dimitar Sasselov, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

 

In 1543 Copernicus showed that our planet isn't the center of the universe. Centuries later, we know that just as Earth is not the center of things, the life on it is probably not unique either. Or is it? Tonight, learn how the search for "super-Earths" - rocky planets larger than our own that orbit other stars - may provide the key to answering essential questions about the origins of life here and elsewhere. You'll also hear how we face a moment of unprecedented potential - a convergence of pioneering efforts in astronomy and biology to peer into the unknown and determine how unique Earth life truly is.

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101 Websites for Science Teachers

101 Websites for Science Teachers | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
A list of the top 101 websites for science teachers including general science, astronomy, biology, chemistry, physics, and more.

Via Cornélia Castro
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Angela Stubbs's curator insight, December 21, 2012 3:54 PM

Science Websites

mdashf's curator insight, January 16, 2013 1:18 PM

Lets just check them out 

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More trials, less errors - An effort to lower incorrect scientific claims through a new type of service

More trials, less errors - An effort to lower incorrect scientific claims through a new type of service | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

So many scientific studies are making incorrect claims that a new service has sprung up to fact-check reported findings by repeating the experiments.

 

A year-old Palo Alto, California, company, Science Exchange, announced on Tuesday its "Reproducibility Initiative," aimed at improving the trustworthiness of published papers. Scientists who want to validate their findings will be able to apply to the initiative, which will choose a lab to redo the study and determine whether the results match. The project sprang from the growing realization that the scientific literature - from social psychology to basic cancer biology - is riddled with false findings and erroneous conclusions, raising questions about whether such studies can be trusted. Not only are erroneous studies a waste of money, often taxpayers', but they also can cause companies to misspend time and resources as they try to invent drugs based on false discoveries.

 

Last year, Bayer Healthcare reported that its scientists could not reproduce some 75 percent of published findings in cardiovascular disease, cancer and women's health. In March, Lee Ellis of M.D. Anderson Cancer Center and C. Glenn Begley, the former head of global cancer research at Amgen, reported that when the company's scientists tried to replicate 53 prominent studies in basic cancer biology, hoping to build on them for drug discovery, they were able to confirm the results of only six.

 

The new initiative's 10-member board of prominent scientists will match investigators with a lab qualified to test their results, said Elizabeth Iorns, Science Exchange's co-founder and chief executive officer. The original lab would pay the second for its work. How much depends on the experiment's complexity and the cost of study materials, but should not exceed 20 percent of the original research study's costs. Iorns hopes government and private funding agencies will eventually fund replication to improve the integrity of scientific literature.

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Biology opens up - geneticists eye the potential of arXiv

Biology opens up - geneticists eye the potential of arXiv | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
The preprint server arXiv.org is perhaps best known as the preserve of theoretical physicists and astrophysicists. But 2008 saw an influx of submissions of unpublished manuscripts, or preprints, by condensed-matter physicists who wanted to stake claims to the fast-moving subject of iron-based superconductors called pnictides. Now the life sciences may be on the cusp of their own ‘pnictide moment’, with population geneticists leading the charge.

 

Recently, leading research groups have posted to arXiv several high-profile papers. Other prominent population geneticists have submitted methods-based papers to the server, which is hosted by Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. The number of biology papers on the server is still small in comparison with physical-sciences preprints, but Paul Ginsparg, a theoretical physicist at Cornell who founded arXiv in 1991, welcomes what he hopes could be a sea change.

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Forbes: Machine Learning (CS 229) is Stanford's Most Popular Course

Forbes: Machine Learning (CS 229) is Stanford's Most Popular Course | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Why Is Machine Learning (CS 229) The Most Popular Course At Stanford?  It turns out that artificial intelligence (AI) and the robotics that is tied to it, consists of two primary systems, control and perception.


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Is ‘massive open online research’ (MOOR) the next frontier for education?

Is ‘massive open online research’ (MOOR) the next frontier for education? | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

UC San Diego is launching the first major online course that prominently features “massive open online research” (MOOR).

 

For Bioinformatics, UC San Diego computer science and engineering professor Pavel Pevzner and his graduate students are offering a course on Coursera that combines research with a MOOC (massive open online course) for the first time.

 

“All students who sign up for the course will be given an opportunity to work on specific research projects under the leadership of prominent bioinformatics scientists from different countries, who have agreed to interact and mentor their respective teams.”

 

“The natural progression of education is for people to make a transition from learning to research, which is a huge jump for many students, and essentially impossible for students in isolated areas,” said Ph.D. student Phillip Compeau, who helped develop the online course. “By integrating the research with an interactive text and a MOOC, it creates a pipeline to streamline this transition.”

 

Bioinformatics Algorithms (Part I) will run for eight weeks starting October 21, 2013, and students are now able to sign up and download some of the course materials. It is offered free of charge to everyone.

 

Another unique feature of the online course: Pevzner and Compeau have developed Bioinformatics Algorithms: An Active-Learning Approach, a e-book supporting the course, while Pevzner’s colleagues in Russia developed a content delivery system that integrates the e-book with hundreds of quizzes and dozens of homework problems.

 

The U.S.-Russian team, led by Pevzner’s foreign student Nikolay Vyahhi, also implemented the online course using the beta version of Stepic, a new, fully integrated educational platform and startup developed by Vyahhi. Stepic derives its name from the “step-by-step, epic” solution its developers delivered for electronic publishing.

 

The course also provides access to Rosalind, a free online resource for learning bioinformatics through problem solving. Rosalind was developed by Pevzner’s students and colleagues in San Diego and St. Petersburg with funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Russian Ministry of Education, and Russian Internet billionaires Yuri Milner and Pavel Durov through their “Start Fellows” award. Rosalind already has over 10,000 active users worldwide.

 

Rosalind — named in honor of British scientist Rosalind Franklin, whose X-ray crystallography with Raymond Gosling facilitated the discovery of the DNA double helix by Watson and Crick — will grade the programming assignments. They come in the form of bioinformatics problems of growing complexity as the course progresses.

 

“We developed Rosalind to inspire both biologists and computer science students,” said Rosalind principal developer Vyahhi, who worked with Pevzner during the latter’s sabbatical in Russia. “The platform allows biologists to develop vital programming skills for bioinformatics at their own pace, and Rosalind can also appeal to programmers who have never been exposed to some of the exciting computational problems generated by molecular biology.”


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Amazing Science: Education and Learning Postings

Amazing Science: Education and Learning Postings | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Education in Science is a collection of resources for learners. Resources include videos and interactives that help scientific learners find out about the different fields of science and make connections to what they are learning in school, college or university.


Lessons are inquiry based and encourage exploration in life science, physical science, earth science and technology/innovation. We are at a point where almost everyone has a computer at home, each of them hooked up to enormous libraries where anyone can ask any question and be given answers.

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What Most Schools Don't Teach - How To Code

Learn about a new "superpower" that isn't being taught in 90% of US schools.

Starring Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, will.i.am, Chris Bosh, Jack Dorsey, Tony Hsieh, Drew Houston, Gabe Newell, Ruchi Sanghvi, Elena Silenok, Vanessa Hurst, and Hadi Partovi.

Directed by Leslie Chilcott. Executive producers Hadi and Ali Partovi.

 

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Samantha Rissel's curator insight, May 13, 2013 8:03 AM

This has been floating around for a while; it's an interesting concept.  Is the realm of necessary knowledge changing, and if so, ohw?  

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Mining PubMed for Biomarker-Disease Associations to Guide Discovery

Mining PubMed for Biomarker-Disease Associations to Guide Discovery | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Biomedical knowledge is growing exponentially. However, meta-knowledge around the data is often lacking. PubMed is a database comprising more than 21 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE and additional life science journals dating back to the 1950s. To explore the use and frequency of biomarkers across human disease, researchers have recently mined PubMed for biomarker-disease associations. They ranked the top 100 linked diseases by relevance and mapped them to medical subject headings (MeSH) and, subsequently, to the Disease Ontology. To identify biomarkers for each disease, they queried Covance BioPathways, an online data resource that maps commercial biomarker assays to biological and disease pathways. They then integrated pathways-based information to describe both known and potential biomarkers, as well as disease-associated genes/proteins for select diseases (e.g., atherosclerosis and asthma). This approach identifies therapeutic areas with candidate or validated biomarkers, and highlights those areas where a paucity of biomarkers exists.

 

Main conclusion: Given the molecular interdependencies within a cell, a disease is rarely a consequence of a single gene abnormality, but instead reflects the perturbation of a complex network of biological and signaling pathways. The approach outlined here describes the detection and ranking of human disease based on research/clinical activity surrounding biomarkers. It also enables the identification of therapeutic areas with candidate or validated biomarkers. The strategy takes an integrative approach to identify candidate disease biomarkers by combining disease-associated genes/proteins with commercially validated assays for known biomarkers. A system-level model of disease that incorporates molecular interactions across biological and signaling pathways has been built that allowed to identify each gene/protein in the model that has an existing commercially validated assay. This strategy offers an alternative, comprehensive view of key relationships and pathway perturbations that may identify biomarkers of disease emergence or progression.

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The Future Of Education Eliminates The Classroom -- Because The World Is Your Class

The Future Of Education Eliminates The Classroom -- Because The World Is Your Class | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) might seem like best way to use the Internet to open up education, but you’re thinking too small. Technology can turn our entire lives into learning experiences.


Socialstructed learning is an aggregation of microlearning experiences drawn from a rich ecology of content and driven not by grades but by social and intrinsic rewards. The microlearning moment may last a few minutes, hours, or days, if you are absorbed in reading something, tinkering with something, or listening to something from which you just can’t walk away. Socialstructed learning may be the future, but the foundations of this kind of education lie far in the past. Leading philosophers of education --from Socrates to Plutarch, Rousseau to Dewey-- talked about many of these ideals centuries ago. Today, we have a host of tools to make their vision finally a reality.


Think of a simple augmented reality apps on the iPhone such as Yelp Monocle. When you point the phone’s camera toward a particular location, it displays “points of interest” in that location, such as restaurants, stores, and museums. Augmented reality -- but this is just the beginning. What if, instead of restaurant and store information, we could access historical, artistic, demographic, environmental, architectural, and other kinds of information embedded in the real world? All our cultural inheritance is only a click away.

 

This is exactly what a project from USC and UCLA called HyperCities is doing: layering historical information on the actual city terrain. As you walk around with your cell phone, you can point to a site and see what it looked like a century ago, who lived there, what the environment was like. Not interested in architecture, passionate about botany and landscaping instead? The Smithsonian’s free iPhone and iPad app, Leafsnap, responds when you take a photo of a tree leaf by instantly searching a growing library of leaf images amassed by the Smithsonian Institution. In seconds, it displays a likely species name along with high-resolution photographs of and information on the tree’s flowers, fruit, seeds, and bark. We are turning each pixel of our geography into a live textbook and a live encyclopedia.


So look beyond MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) in thinking about the future education. In our focus on MOOCs and how they are likely to disrupt existing classrooms and educational institutions, particularly colleges and universities, we are missing the much larger story. Today’s obsession with MOOCs is a reminder of the old forecasting paradigm: In the early stages of technology introduction we try to fit new technologies into existing social structures in ways that have become familiar to us.

 

MOOCs today are our equivalents of early TV, when TV personalities looked and sounded like radio announcers (or often were radio announcers). People are thinking the same way about MOOCs, as replacements of traditional lectures or tutorials, but in online rather than physical settings. In the meantime, a whole slew of forces is driving a much larger transformation, breaking learning (and education overall) out of traditional institutional environments and embedding it in everyday settings and interactions, distributed across a wide set of platforms and tools. They include a rapidly growing and open content commons (Wikipedia is just one example), on-demand expertise and help (from Mac Forums to Fluther, Instructables, and WikiHow), mobile devices and geo-coded information that takes information into the physical world around us and makes it available any place any time, new work and social spaces that are, in fact, evolving as important learning spaces (TechShop, Meetups, hackathons, community labs).

 

We are moving away from the model in which learning is organized around stable, usually hierarchical institutions (schools, colleges, universities) that, for better and worse, have served as the main gateways to education and social mobility. Replacing that model is a new system in which learning is best conceived of as a flow, where learning resources are not scarce but widely available, opportunities for learning are abundant, and learners increasingly have the ability to autonomously dip into and out of continuous learning flows.


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Cleverer still - Geniuses are getting brighter. Girls are not as far behind boys as they used to be

Cleverer still - Geniuses are getting brighter. Girls are not as far behind boys as they used to be | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

SCIENCE has few more controversial topics than human intelligence—in particular, whether variations in it are a result of nature or nurture, and especially whether such variations differ between the sexes. The mines in this field can blow up an entire career, as Larry Summers found out in 2005 when he spoke of the hypothesis that the mathematical aptitude needed for physics and engineering, as well as for maths itself, is innately rarer in women than in men. He resigned as president of Harvard University shortly afterwards.

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Scientific Graduate Degree For $100?

Scientific Graduate Degree For $100? | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Conventional ­university teaching is way too costly, inefficient and ­ineffective to survive for long, says Sebastian Thrun.

Via António Antunes
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Learnable Programming: Designing programming systems for understanding programs

Learnable Programming: Designing programming systems for understanding programs | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

How do we get people to understand programming?

 

Khan Academy recently launched an online environment for learning to program. It offers a set of tutorials based on the JavaScript and Processing languages, and features a "live coding" environment, where the program's output updates as the programmer types.

 

Because my work was cited as an inspiration for the Khan system, I felt I should respond with two thoughts about learning: Programming is a way of thinking, not a rote skill. Learning about "for" loops is not learning to program, any more than learning about pencils is learning to draw.

 

People understand what they can see. If a programmer cannot see what a program is doing, she can't understand it. Thus, the goals of a programming system should be:

 

• to support and encourage powerful ways of thinking
• to enable programmers to see and understand the execution of their programs

 

A live-coding Processing environment addresses neither of these goals. JavaScript and Processing are poorly-designed languages that support weak ways of thinking, and ignore decades of learning about learning. And live coding, as a standalone feature, is worthless. Alan Perlis wrote, "To understand a program, you must become both the machine and the program." This view is a mistake, and it is this widespread and virulent mistake that keeps programming a difficult and obscure art. A person is not a machine, and should not be forced to think like one.

 

How do we get people to understand programming? We change programming. We turn it into something that's understandable by people.

 

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iBioSeminars - Bringing the World's Best Biology Classes to YOU

iBioSeminars - Bringing the World's Best Biology Classes to YOU | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Free biology talks by the world's leading scientists. Our mission is to produce a library of outstanding science lectures. We will add 15-20 seminars per year in a wide-range of biology topics. Access, through web streaming or download, is completely free-of-charge. Also check out our iBioMagazine channel, where you can watch ~10 minute talks about the human-side of science.
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PLoS Collections: Article collections published by the Public Library of Science

PLoS Collections: Article collections published by the Public Library of Science | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
his collection aims to highlight PLOS ONE's role in the emerging interdisciplinary field of synthetic biology. The collection has its roots in PLOS ONE's very first issue, which included two publications from the field and since then, the number of synthetic biology articles published by the journal has grown steadily. As the field continues to develop, this collection will be updated to include new publications, thereby tracking the evolution of this dynamic research area.

 

Synthetic biology occurs at the intersection of a number of traditional disciplines, including biology, chemistry, and engineering. It aims to create biological systems that can be programmed to do useful things such as producing drugs and biofuel. The interdisciplinary nature of synthetic biology can make it difficult to publish in traditional journals. PLOS ONE's broad scope, however, allows for the publication of work crossing many traditional research boundaries, making it an ideal venue for many different types of synthetic biology publications. In addition, the journal's focus on rigorous peer review without considering impact has made it possible to publish a body of articles that truly reflects the multifaceted nature of this research area.

 

One overarching theme of synthetic biology is standardization, which can only be achieved through concerted community effort. To this end, each article published in PLOS ONE can be the start of a lively conversation. The ability to comment on articles provides the community with a means to engage in a dialogue focused on specific articles, and the "Share this Article" feature allows readers to quickly send an article they find interesting to their entire networks, because all the content is openly accessible.

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