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Amazing Robot Controlled By Rat Brain Cells Continues Progress

Amazing Robot Controlled By Rat Brain Cells Continues Progress | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Kevin Warwick, a researcher in cybernetics at the University of Reading, has been working on creating neural networks that can control machines. He and his team have taken the brain cells from rats, cultured them, and used them as the guidance control circuit for simple wheeled robots. Electrical impulses from the bot enter the batch of neurons, and responses from the cells are turned into commands for the device. The cells can form new connections, making the system a true learning machine. Warwick hasn’t released any new videos of the rat brain robot for the past few years, but the three older clips we have for you below are still awesome. He and his competitors continue to move this technology forward – animal cyborgs are real.

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Snowflakes Up Close - A Small, Fragile World

Snowflakes Up Close - A Small, Fragile World | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

If you’re one of those people who likes to ponder things while looking out a frosty window on a cold winter day, these pictures will clear up one of those long standing wonders: each snowflake really IS unique. Some look like roman columns, others circuit boards or spaceships. Taken under high magnification using a microscope, these images bring a fragile and beautiful world into view.

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Interactive Exploration of a Dynamical System - Preditor-Prey Example

A user interface for exploring systems of differential equations. Every variable is shown as a plot; every parameter has a knob that can be adjusted in realtime. This ubiquitous visualization and in-context-manipulation helps the user develop a sense for how the parameters of the system influence its behavior.

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New genetic method to pinpoint individuals' geographic origin

New genetic method to pinpoint individuals' geographic origin | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Understanding the genetic diversity within and between populations has important implications for studies of human disease and evolution. This includes identifying associations between genetic variants and disease, detecting genomic regions that have undergone positive selection and highlighting interesting aspects of human population history. Now, a team of researchers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, UCLA's Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Israel's Tel Aviv University has developed an innovative approach to the study of genetic diversity called spatial ancestry analysis (SPA), which allows for the modeling of genetic variation in two- or three-dimensional space.

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Stem-cell-growing surface enables bone repair

Stem-cell-growing surface enables bone repair | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

University of Michigan researchers have proven that a special surface, free of biological contaminants, allows adult-derived stem cells to thrive and transform into multiple cell types. Their success brings stem cell therapies another step closer. To prove the cells’ regenerative powers, bone cells grown on this surface were then transplanted into holes in the skulls of mice, producing four times as much new bone growth as in the mice without the extra bone cells.

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Bret Victor - Inventing on Principle

Bio: Bret Victor invents tools that enable people to understand and create. He has designed experimental UI concepts at Apple, interactive data graphics for Al Gore, and musical instruments at Alesis.
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Non-invasive intracellullar 'thermometer' with fluorescent proteins developed

Non-invasive intracellullar 'thermometer' with fluorescent proteins developed | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Biologists have developed a technique to measure internal cell temperatures without altering their metabolism. This finding could be useful when distinguishing healthy cells from cancerous ones, as well as learning more about cellular processes.

Via Anne Osterrieder
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NASA - SDO images from an incandescent part of the spectrum

This video takes SDO images and applies additional processing to enhance the structures visible. While there is no scientific value to this processing, it does result in a beautiful, new way of looking at the sun. The original frames are in the 171 Angstrom wavelength of extreme ultraviolet. This wavelength shows plasma in the solar atmosphere, called the corona, that is around 600,000 Kelvin. The loops represent plasma held in place by magnetic fields. They are concentrated in "active regions" where the magnetic fields are the strongest. These active regions usually appear in visible light as sunspots. The events in this video represent 24 hours of activity on September 25, 2011.

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Gene discovery could lead to birth control pill for men

Gene discovery could lead to birth control pill for men | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

When it comes to birth control, numerous options are available to women to help them regulate their menstrual cycle and prevent ovulation. However, there are only very few options available to regulate fertility of men.

 

The protein Katnal1 is involved to regulate a structure known as microtubules – parts of sperms that is needed for support and the acquisition of nutrients. Breaking down these microtubules inhibits sperms’ ability to move throughout the testes during their maturation. The gene’s discovery not only paves the way for a male contraceptive pill, but could also aid in better understanding cases of male infertility.

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Beam Me Up Scotty: 'Tractor beams' of light pull small objects towards them

Beam Me Up Scotty: 'Tractor beams' of light pull small objects towards them | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Tractor beams are a well-known concept in science fiction. These rays of light are often shown pulling objects towards an observer, seemingly violating the laws of physics, and of course, such beams have yet to be realised in the real world. Haifeng Wang at the A*STAR Data Storage Institute and co-workers have now demonstrated how a tractor beam can in fact be realized on a small scale.

 

Based on pioneering work by Albert Einstein and Max Planck more than a hundred years ago, it is known that light carries momentum that pushes objects away. In addition, the intensity that varies across a laser beam can be used to push objects sideways, and for example can be used to move cells in biotechnology applications. Pulling an object towards an observer, however, has so far proven to be elusive. In 2011, researchers theoretically demonstrated a mechanism where light movement can be controlled using two opposing light beams -- though technically, this differs from the idea behind a tractor beam.

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Thioridazine kills cancer stem cells while avoiding toxic side-effects of conventional cancer treatments

Thioridazine kills cancer stem cells while avoiding toxic side-effects of conventional cancer treatments | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

A team of scientists at McMaster University has discovered a drug, thioridazine, successfully kills cancer stem cells in the human while avoiding the toxic side-effects of conventional cancer treatments. The unusual aspect of our finding is the way this human-ready drug actually kills cancer stem cells; by changing them into cells that are non-cancerous. Unlike chemotherapy and radiation, thioridazine appears to have no effect on normal stem cells. The research holds the promise of a new strategy and discovery pipeline for the development of anticancer drugs in the treatment of various cancers. The research team has identified another dozen drugs that have good potential for the same response.

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Oldest musical instruments found - flutes from mammoth ivory carbon-dated to be 43,000 years old

Oldest musical instruments found - flutes from mammoth ivory carbon-dated to be 43,000 years old | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Researchers have identified what they say are the oldest-known musical instruments in the world. The flutes, made from bird bone and mammoth ivory, come from a cave in southern Germany which contains early evidence for the occupation of Europe by modern humans - Homo sapiens. Scientists used carbon dating to show that the flutes were between 42,000 and 43,000 years old.

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Scientists turn skin cells into beating heart muscle

Scientists turn skin cells into beating heart muscle | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Scientists have for the first time succeeded in taking skin cells from patients with heart failure and transforming them into healthy, beating heart tissue that could one day be used to treat the condition. The researchers, based in Haifa, Israel, said there were still many years of testing and refining ahead. But the results meant they might eventually be able to reprogram patients' cells to repair their own damaged hearts.

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American Museum of Natural History - The Known Universe [Video]

The Known Universe takes viewers from the Himalayas through our atmosphere and the inky black of space to the afterglow of the Big Bang. Every star, planet, and quasar seen in the film is possible because of the world's most complete four-dimensional map of the universe, the Digital Universe Atlas that is maintained and updated by astrophysicists at the American Museum of Natural History. The new film, created by the Museum, is part of an exhibition, Visions of the Cosmos: From the Milky Ocean to an Evolving Universe, at the Rubin Museum of Art in Manhattan through May 2010.
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Rubik cube solved in 20 movements or less

Rubik cube solved in 20 movements or less | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Rubik's Cube is a 3-D mechanical puzzle invented in 1974 by Hungarian sculptor and professor of architecture Ernő Rubik. Originally called the "Magic Cube", the puzzle was licensed by Rubik to be sold by Ideal Toy Corp. in 1980 and won the German Game of the Year special award for Best Puzzle that year. As of January 2009, 350 million cubes had been sold worldwide making it the world's top-selling puzzle game. It is widely considered to be the world's best-selling toy. There are more than 43 quintillion possible configurations, or 43,252,003,274,489,856,000 to be exact. Allowing a second for each turn, it would take 1,400 trillion years to go through all the possible configurations. After now thirty years of brainstorming, a famous open problem about the Cube has finally been resolved - 20 is the number. No matter how mixed up the Cube is, it can be solved in 20 moves or less.

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9 Apps To Easily Make 3D Printable Objects

9 Apps To Easily Make 3D Printable Objects | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

One of the problems with 3D printing is getting a hold of things to print. You can of course download pre-made objects from a variety of places like Thingiverse; but if you want something unique and made by you, that’s where things get a little difficult. Here are 9 quick and easy apps for making something a little more unique.

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UCSC Genomics Text Indexing

UCSC Genomics Text Indexing | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Text2Genome is using a unique way to map scientific articles to genomic locations: From a full-text scientific article and it's supplementary data files, all words that resemble DNA sequences are extracted and then mapped to public genome sequences. They can then be displayed on genome browser websites and used in data-mining applications.

 

More info: http://text2genome.smith.man.ac.uk/

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New Electron Microscope Enables to Observe 3D Image in "Real Time"

New Electron Microscope Enables to Observe 3D Image in "Real Time" | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

A Japanese research group developed a scanning electron microscope (SEM) capable of showing a 3D image in real time and a high-resolution naked-eye 3D monitor for the SEM. The group consists of researchers from Hitachi High-Technologies Corp, Eizo Nanao Corp, Niigata University, Shizuoka University, etc. The new SEM is expected to be used not only for analyzing the structure of an object but for microanatomy using a manipulator and measuring electrical characteristics of inorganic materials.

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Brave New World with Stephen Hawking (all episodes)

Episode 1: MACHINES - http://youtu.be/8yjV-fdRgyQ

Episode 2: HEALTH - http://youtu.be/uohSveB9ywc
Episode 3: TECHNOLOGY - http://youtu.be/hWnus2P4w90
Episode 4: ENVIRONMENT - http://youtu.be/inLe_gasaTA
Episode 5: BIOLOGY - http://youtu.be/kHF8dP3RDYw

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Cesium-137 contamination: Fukushima amounts to four Chernobyls

Cesium-137 contamination: Fukushima amounts to four Chernobyls | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
TEPCO’s new estimates suggest that its Fukushima reactor has released more than quadruple the amount of radioactive cesium-137 leaked during the Chernobyl disaster. But the method used to measure the damage may undervalue the hazard even further.
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A History of Asteroid Collision Near Misses

A History of Asteroid Collision Near Misses | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Asteroids were formed when the space between Jupiter and Mars did not allow the formation of any planetary bodies. The objects in the space broke and fragmented giving rise to asteroids which can have a diameter of over 500 miles or as small as 20 feet. Asteroids travel around the sun in an elliptical orbit and due to their irregular shape can bounce off course, tumble and change orbit. Changing orbit sometimes means that an asteroid can encounter other planets. One of those is our home planet.

 

Historically we have little to go on when it comes to asteroid near misses in history. The Comet of 1491 came dangerously close, possibly less than four times the distance to the moon. In 1972, a comet bounced off the surface of the atmosphere streaking through the sky as a fireball over Utah. Only 14 meters in diameter, this near miss could have delivered an impact about half the strength of the atomic bomb that hit Hiroshima. Comet Hyakutake passed very close in 1996 and was discovered only two months before it started its earth approach.

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World's smallest artificial heart saves life of 16-month-old boy

World's smallest artificial heart saves life of 16-month-old boy | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Italian doctors implant titanium pump weighing only 11 grams to keep infant alive until donor was found for transplant. 

 

The doctors at Rome's Bambino Gesù hospital said the operation was carried out last month and made public this week. The baby, whose identity has not been disclosed, was kept alive for 13 days before the transplant and is now doing well. The baby was suffering from dilated myocardiopathy, a heart muscle disease which normally causes stretched or enlarged fibres of the heart. The disease gradually makes the heart weaker, stopping its ability to pump blood effectively.

 

http://tinyurl.com/aqsuuh6

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There's more water on Jupiter's tiny moon Europa than there is on Earth

There's more water on Jupiter's tiny moon Europa than there is on Earth | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Based on data acquired by NASA's Galileo satellite, astronomers think the global oceans sloshing around beneath Europa's icy exterior are likely 2—3 times more voluminous than the oceans here on Earth. Not 2—3 times more proportionally, 2—3 times more in total volume.
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Invisibility cloak traps rainbow - slowing light down to a near-stop

Invisibility cloak traps rainbow - slowing light down to a near-stop | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Researchers have trapped a rainbow - slowing light to a near-stop - in an array of 25,000 "invisibility cloaks", each smaller than a hair's breadth.

 

The trick could aid the analysis of complex samples or even communications. In recent years, a number of research efforts has demonstrated a wide range of cloaking techniques. Light can either be guided around or cancelled by a material that makes an object invisible to an observer. For the most part, such cloaks have been tiny or limited in the range of colours or angles of light they work with. Nevertheless, this kind of engineering of light and the paths it takes has in principle a great many applications besides invisibility.

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Chimpanzees and orangutans really do have personalities "like people"

Chimpanzees and orangutans really do have personalities "like people" | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

For years experts have debated whether great apes truly display human-like personalities - or if such behaviour is simply the anthropomorphic projections of human observers. The research team used a statistical technique to "remove" any biases apparent in human observers of the apes' behaviour, and they say their findings suggest man and ape really do share "personality dimensions".

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