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Making Sense of the World, Several Senses at a Time

Making Sense of the World, Several Senses at a Time | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Our five senses–sight, hearing, touch, taste and smell–seem to operate independently, as five distinct modes of perceiving the world. In reality, however, they collaborate closely to enable the mind to better understand its surroundings. We can become aware of this collaboration under special circumstances. In some cases, a sense may covertly influence the one we think is dominant. When visual information clashes with that from sound, sensory crosstalk can cause what we see to alter what we hear.

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5 Ways Cyborg Insects Could Change The World

5 Ways Cyborg Insects Could Change The World | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Scientists have made amazing progress lately in turning insects into cyborgs. Almost every week, there's another news story about cyborg insect first responders, or cockroach fuel cells.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Ocean trenches: Take a dive 11,000m down - BBC interactive

Ocean trenches: Take a dive 11,000m down - BBC interactive | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Icy cold, pitch black and with crushing pressures - the deepest part of the ocean is one of the most hostile places on the planet.
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Robotic Bees close to reality

Robotic Bees close to reality | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Researchers at Harvard have come up with a novel manufacturing process for building robotic bees, finding inspiration from the worlds of pop-up books and origami.
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Two molecules communicate via single photons

Two molecules communicate via single photons | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Scientists realize one of the most elementary and oldest 'gedanken' experiments in modern physics, namely, excitation of a single molecule with a single photon.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Frozen Mummy’s Genetic Blueprints Unveiled

Frozen Mummy’s Genetic Blueprints Unveiled | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

By peering deeply into the DNA of the mummy known as Ötzi, geneticists have expanded the rap sheet on the 5,300-year-old Iceman: He had brown eyes, brown hair and blood type O, was lactose intolerant and his modern-day relatives live on Corsica and Sardinia.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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All genomes are dysfunctional: broken genes in healthy individuals

All genomes are dysfunctional: broken genes in healthy individuals | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Genome-sequencing studies indicate that all humans carry many genetic variants predicted to cause loss of function (LoF) of protein-coding genes, suggesting unexpected redundancy in the human genome. It is estimated that human genomes typically contain ~100 genuine LoF variants with ~20 genes completely inactivated. A recent paper in Science describes some of these rare and likely deleterious LoF alleles, including 26 known and 21 predicted severe disease–causing variants, as well as common LoF variants in nonessential genes.

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Eight technologies for a healthier future

Eight technologies for a healthier future | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Welcome to a new list of New Year’s resolutions — a list that likely includes some variation on adopting a healthier lifestyle. Thanks to the acceleration of technology, fulfilling your resolutions this time around may be easier than it was in the previous year.

 

http://tinyurl.com/7fc3u7q

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Swimming through the blood stream: Stanford engineers create wireless, self-propelled medical device

Swimming through the blood stream: Stanford engineers create wireless, self-propelled medical device | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
For 50 years, scientists searched for the secret to making tiny implantable devices that could travel through the bloodstream. Engineers at Stanford have demonstrated just such a device.
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Evidence for elusive Majorana fermions raises possibilities for quantum computers

Evidence for elusive Majorana fermions raises possibilities for quantum computers | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Quantum particles come in two types, fermions and bosons. Whereas bosons can be their own antiparticles, which means that they can annihilate each other in a flash of energy, fermions generally have distinct antiparticles; for example, an electron’s antiparticle is the positively charged positron. But in 1937, Italian physicist Ettore Majorana adapted equations that Englishman Paul Dirac had used to describe the behaviour of fermions and bosons to predict the existence of a type of fermion that was its own antiparticle. Over decades, particle physicists have looked for Majorana fermions in nature, and after 2008, condensed-matter physicists began to think of ways in which they could be formed from the collective behaviour of electrons in solid-state materials, specifically, on surfaces placed in contact with superconductors or in one-dimensional wires.

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Why Doctors Need to Embrace Their Digital Future Now

Why Doctors Need to Embrace Their Digital Future Now | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Medicine has certainly progressed in the past 50 years, but the day when tricorders diagnose every ailment instantly and treatments are tailored to our DNA seems as far off as ever. Eric Topol is trying to bridge that gap. In his new book, The Creative Destruction of Medicine, Topol—the chief academic officer at Scripps Health—calls on patients to demand true digital medicine now. Dr. Topol talks about genetics, gadgets, and his vision of a Khan Academy for doctors.

 

http://tinyurl.com/7fel847

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Are the Universe's secrets hiding on a chip?

Are the Universe's secrets hiding on a chip? | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Quantum field theory has been extraordinarily successful in describing the Universe, but some of its predictions have proved difficult to verify. Some formulations suggest the existence of axions — weakly interacting particles proposed to account for unseen 'dark matter', which could make up almost a quarter of the Universe's mass. The theory also allows for the existence of magnetic monopoles, points of individual north and south that have never been seen in nature. "We live in one kind of universe, but inside these solids you can create these unusual universes," says Ali Yazdani, a physicist at Princeton University in New Jersey.
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NASA - Ultra-fast Outflows Help Monster Black Holes Shape Their Galaxies

NASA - Ultra-fast Outflows Help Monster Black Holes Shape Their Galaxies | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
A curious correlation between the mass of a galaxy's central black hole and the velocity of stars in a vast, roughly spherical structure known as its bulge has puzzled astronomers for years.
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Planet from Hell: Blustery Exoplanet Charted in 2-D for First Time

Planet from Hell: Blustery Exoplanet Charted in 2-D for First Time | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Astronomers have made a crude two-dimensional thermal map of an extrasolar world they cannot yet see, confirming that violent winds rapidly whip around the planet. A mere 60 light-years away, orbiting an orange star called HD 189733, is a giant gas planet, like Jupiter or Saturn, but unlike those familiar worlds this one hugs tightly to its host star, orbiting at about one thirtieth the distance at which Earth circles the sun. The exoplanet, labeled HD 189733 b by astronomical convention, stays mighty toasty under its astronomical broiler, with temperatures upward of 900 degrees Celsius.

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Anti-Aging Protein Extends Life Span in Mice, and Maybe Humans

Anti-Aging Protein Extends Life Span in Mice, and Maybe Humans | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Things are looking up for aging mice and, if this research pays off, for aging humans, too.

 

Researchers have found that a long-suspected anti-aging protein called sirtuin can make male mice live about 16 percent longer than average, the first such advance for mammals in a field that has thus far only offered the blessings of extended life span to yeast, nematodes and fruit flies...


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'Universal' vaccines could finally allow for wide-scale flu prevention

'Universal' vaccines could finally allow for wide-scale flu prevention | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

An emerging class of long-lasting flu vaccines could do more than just save people the trouble of an annual flu shot. Princeton University-based researchers have found that the "universal" vaccine could for the first time allow for the effective, wide-scale prevention of flu by limiting the influenza virus' ability to spread and mutate. Universal, or cross-protective, vaccines — so named for their effectiveness against several flu strains — are being developed in various labs worldwide and some are already in clinical trials.

 

The researchers recently reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that the new vaccines would make a bout with influenza less severe, making it more difficult for the virus to spread. At the same time, the vaccines would target relatively unchanging parts of the virus and hamper the virus' notorious ability to evolve and evade immunity; current flu vaccines target the pathogen's most adaptable components.

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Giant Stick Insect Believed Extinct Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides for 80 Years

Giant Stick Insect Believed Extinct Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides for 80 Years | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

The insect is so large — as big as a human hand — it's been dubbed a "tree lobster." It was thought to be extinct, but some enterprising entomologists scoured a barren hunk of rock in the middle of the ocean and found surviving Lord Howe Island, Australia.

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Foundation Medicine: Personalizing Cancer Drugs

Foundation Medicine: Personalizing Cancer Drugs | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Foundation Medicine is offering a test that helps oncologists choose drugs targeted to the genetic profile of a patient's tumor cells. Has personalized cancer treatment finally arrived?
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Is Biological Immortality Possible? New Research Suggests "Yes"

Is Biological Immortality Possible? New Research Suggests "Yes" | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Researchers from The University of Nottingham have demonstrated how a species of flatworm overcomes the ageing process to be potentially immortal.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Age-Related Memory Loss Reversed in Monkeys

Age-Related Memory Loss Reversed in Monkeys | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

New research from Yale University uncovers cellular changes that seem to underlie memory loss in monkeys, and shows that it can be reversed with drugs. By delivering a certain chemical to the brain, researchers could make neurons in old monkeys behave like those in young monkeys. Clinical trials of a generic drug that mimics this effect are already underway.

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Great set of articles on "Human Modification & Enhancement"

Great set of articles on "Human Modification & Enhancement" | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Scientists are experimenting with different ways to enhance humans. What's possible? And what may be possible in the future? Does messing with Mother Nature raise ethical questions?
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Nano-Patching a Broken Heart

Nano-Patching a Broken Heart | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

How can you mend a broken heart? Cardiologists have been wrestling with this question for years. The difficulty is that when one suffers a myocardial infarction (heart attack), the lack of blood supply to certain parts of the heart can eventually cause myocardial scarring. Myocardial scarring can lead to potentially life-threatening arrhythmias and increase the risk of a ventricular aneurism. Moreover, the loss of this healthy heart tissue is essentially permanent. Part of the heart literally dies.

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Why Do Some People Learn Faster?

Why Do Some People Learn Faster? | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

The physicist Niels Bohr once defined an expert as "a person who has made all the mistakes that can be made in a very narrow field". A new study, forthcoming in Psychological Science, and led by Jason Moser at Michigan State University, expands on this important concept. The question at the heart of the paper is simple: Why are some people so much more effective at learning from their mistakes? After all, everybody screws up. The important part is what happens next. Do we ignore the mistake, brushing it aside for the sake of our self-confidence? Or do we investigate the error, seeking to learn from the snafu?

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Springtail found 2,000 meters underground is title holder of "deepest terrestrial arthropod ever found"

Springtail found 2,000 meters underground is title holder of "deepest terrestrial arthropod ever found" | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

The newly discovered "Plutomurus ortobalaganensis", a springtail found almost 2,000 meters underground and the title holder of "deepest terrestrial arthropod ever found." This creature along with Anurida stereoodorata, Deuteraphorura kruberaensis, and Schaefferia profundissima are four new species identified by researchers who descended into Krubera-Voronja, the world's deepest cave.

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New family of worm-like legless amphibians found

New family of worm-like legless amphibians found | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

 

In the soils of northeastern India, researchers from Delhi University have uncovered an entirely new family of amphibians. Meet the Chikilidae, which belong to an earthworm-like order of amphibians known as caecilians. Seven new species of Chikilidae were uncovered by the team, who recently published their findings in The Proceedings of The Royal Society B.

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