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The future of augmented reality technology

The future of augmented reality technology | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
The future of augmented reality technologyBusiness Review EuropeAugmented reality technology is attracting a lot of attention at the moment with many large brands experimenting with it as a marketing tool.

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Printable houses and architectural structures

Printable houses and architectural structures | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Contour Crafting is a form of 3D printing that uses robotic arms and nozzles to squeeze out layers of concrete or other materials, moving back and forth over a set path in order to fabricate a large component. It is a construction technology that has great potential for low-cost, customized buildings that are quicker to make and can therefore reduce energy and emissions.

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First Bedside Genetic Test Could Prevent Heart Complications

First Bedside Genetic Test Could Prevent Heart Complications | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

For some cardiac patients, recovery from a common heart procedure can be complicated by a single gene responsible for drug processing. The risk could be lowered with the first bedside genetic test of its kind. The test shows promise for quickly and easily identifying patients who need a different medication.

 

http://tinyurl.com/b4h2a43

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Cheap Soul Teleportation, Coming Soon to a Theater Near You?

Cheap Soul Teleportation, Coming Soon to a Theater Near You? | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

The question I wish to raise here is whether we can teleport our soul, and, specifically, how best we might do it. I’ll suggest that we may be able to get near-complete soul teleportation into the movie (or video game) experience, and we can do so with some fairly simple upgrades to the 3D-glasses we already wear in movies.


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Mayo Clinic launches whole genome sequencing breast cancer study

Mayo Clinic launches whole genome sequencing breast cancer study | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

The Breast Cancer Genome Guided Therapy Study (BEAUTY Project) will help physicians tailor chemotherapy to breast cancer patients based on their individual genomes and the genomes of their tumors. Mayo Clinic researchers will obtain three whole genome sequences: one from the patients' healthy cells before treatment, and two tumor genomes – one before chemotherapy and one after. Patients will be paired with mouse "avatars" that will help physicians identify the best treatment for each person.

 

Additional read: DNA of 50 breast cancer patients decoded (http://tinyurl.com/7upzl3z)

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Dinosaurs were surrounded by constant fires

Dinosaurs were surrounded by constant fires | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Dinosaurs once ruled the Earth — but now it appears they ruled in Hell. Ancient charcoal deposits suggest wildfires ran rampant throughout the Cretaceous period, meaning dinosaurs had to spend 80 million years looking out for the next inferno.

 

So just why was the Cretaceous so fiery? First, the greenhouse effect was actually stronger back then than it is today, and this mean global temperatures were hotter. In such a world, random lightning strikes were much more likely to start fires than they are now. It also didn't help that there was actually more oxygen in the atmosphere in the Cretaceous than there is now, and that made the air itself more combustible.

 

Unlike today, where you generally need drought conditions to take hold before wildfires become a serious problem, the Cretaceous — which lasted from about 145 to 65 million years ago — was hot enough and had high enough oxygen levels that even very moist plants could easily burn.

 

Videos about dinosaurs: http://tinyurl.com/7ewez9s

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Bat-killing Fungus Is An European Import

Bat-killing Fungus Is An European Import | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

White-nose infection ups arousal rate during hibernation, depleting the bats' energy stores. The same fungal species wiping out hibernating American bats also strikes their European kin — although it doesn’t kill them. But that’s not because the European strain of the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome is less virulent, a new study finds.

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'Cosmic mirages' confirm accelerated cosmic expansion

'Cosmic mirages' confirm accelerated cosmic expansion | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

An international team of researchers led by Masamune Oguri at Kavli IPMU and Naohisa Inada at Nara National College of Technology conduced an unprecedented survey of gravitationally lensed quasars, and used it to measure the expansion history of the universe. The result provides strong evidence that the expansion of the universe is accelerating. There were several observations that suggested the accelerated cosmic expansion, including distant supernovae for which the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded. The team's result confirms the accelerated cosmic expansion using a completely different approach, which strengthens the case for dark energy.

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New Vaccine That Targets 90% of Cancers Shows Promising Results

New Vaccine That Targets 90% of Cancers Shows Promising Results | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

ImMucin, a vaccine that targets a molecule present in 90 percent of all cancers, has been tested on humans for the first time, according to researchers who found that all the blood cancer patients tested in the trial had greater immunity to the disease after receiving the drug.

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Solar thermal process produces cement with no carbon dioxide emissions

Solar thermal process produces cement with no carbon dioxide emissions | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

While the largest contributor to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions is the power industry, the second largest is the more often overlooked cement industry, which accounts for 5-6% of all anthropogenic CO2 emissions. For every 10 kg of cement produced, the cement industry releases a full 9 kg of CO2. Since the world consumes about 3 trillion kg of cement annually, this sector has one of the highest potentials for CO2 emission reductions. But while processes are being explored to sequester the CO2 from cement production, so far no process can completely eliminate it.

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Everyday Objects Under Electron Microscope

Everyday Objects Under Electron Microscope | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
You come into contact with millions of different objects every day.

 

Many videos on scanning and transmission electron microscopy and how to prepare the samples: http://tinyurl.com/chvml2h


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Would You Pay to have Sex with an Android?

Would You Pay to have Sex with an Android? | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

New research predicts that we will be having sex with actual robots within five years and considers an exciting application of robotic technology – replacing sex workers with androids.

 

Articles on Robotics:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/science-news?tag=robotics


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Venus, a planet without intrinsic magnetic field hosts magnetic storm

Venus, a planet without intrinsic magnetic field hosts magnetic storm | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

When magnetic fields of opposite polarity collide and merge, they unleash a torrent of energy. The process, known as magnetic reconnection, can cause flares on the Sun and magnetic storms and shimmering auroras on magnetized planets with substantial atmospheres, such as Earth, Jupiter and Saturn. Now scientists have discovered that magnetic reconnection also happens on Venus, a planet with no intrinsic magnetic field. The finding, reported today in Science1, suggests that magnetic reconnection may generate auroras on Venus, and could have contributed to the loss of a thick, water-rich atmosphere that scientists believe surrounded the planet during its early history, some 4 billion years ago.

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Coughing Is Linked to Perception of Temperature in the Brain

Coughing Is Linked to Perception of Temperature in the Brain | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Scientists turn off the need to cough but then you can't feel heat anymore. The resone for this unexpected phenomenon is due to the fact that the same cellular receptors that sense temperature and pain also control coughing. The cool relief of a cough drop is no coincidence, as the menthol receptor both suppresses coughs and produces the cool feeling in your throat. There’s a molecular on-switch for coughing, too: a receptor called TRPV1. Unfortunately for researchers looking for a cough cure, inactivating TRPV1 also makes it dangerously difficult to feel heat. Mundane tasks like eating a hot meal or running a bath become hazardous if you don’t reflexively shrink away from scalding heat.

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Rubidium Detector Converts Infrared Images Directly to Visible Light

Rubidium Detector Converts Infrared Images Directly to Visible Light | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Chinese physicists demonstrate a practical system for converting infrared images directly into visible ones.
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The Computing Trend that Will Change Everything

The Computing Trend that Will Change Everything | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
Computing isn't just getting cheaper. It's becoming more energy efficient. That means a world populated by ubiquitous sensors and streams of nanodata. If the energy efficiency of computing continues its historical rate of change, it will increase by a factor of 100 over the next decade, with consequent improvements in mobile computing, sensors, and controls. What new applications and products could become possible with such a large efficiency improvement 10 years hence? What other innovations would be necessary in order for such technologies to be used more effectively?

 

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Mind-controlling virus forces parasitic wasp to change behavior of egg-laying

Mind-controlling virus forces parasitic wasp to change behavior of egg-laying | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

The L. boulardi wasp is sometimes infected by a virus called LbFV (L.boulardi filamentous virus). And just as the wasp takes over the body of its maggot target, so does the virus commandeers the body of the wasp. It changes her behaviour so that she no longer cares if a maggot is already occupied. She will implant her eggs, even if her target has an existing tenant. After infected wasps are finished, a poor maggot might have up to eleven eggs inside it.


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Cooperation Is a Key To Intelligence

Cooperation Is a Key To Intelligence | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Humans and animals with large, complex brains benefit from the need and ability to cooperate. In fact, researchers believe that "intelligence" is correlated with the size of a brain’s neural network, in our species and others may have been an adaption for tool use, for social learning, and for the accumulation of culture. Intelligence might also be the result of sexual selection. Digital organisms that evolved "brains" reveal that cooperation can drive the evolution of intelligence. These findings could explain why humans and certain other animals have such large, complex brains. Global networking could result in the evolution of ever more brainy humans in future.

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Wild Parrots Get Names From Parents

Wild Parrots Get Names From Parents | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Before a green-rumped parrotlet is even able to chirp and squawk, mom and dad teach it a distinct series of sounds used by parrots to recognize a specific individual. In short, they give their nestling a name.

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Alcohol sharpens the mind, research finds

Alcohol sharpens the mind, research finds | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

It is thought alcohol hinders analytical thinking and allows 'creative' thoughts that might otherwise by stifled to take root, allowing test subjects to come up with more imaginative solutions. Psychologists at the University of Illinois set 40 healthy young men a series of brain teasers. They involved being given three words, such as coin, quick and spoon, and coming up with a fourth word that links the three - in this case, silver. Half the group drank the equivalent of two pints of beer before doing the tests, while the rest carried them out sober.

 

The drinking group solved nearly 40 per cent more problems than the others, and took an average of 12 seconds compared to the 15.5 seconds needed by sober subjects.
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Trajectories of Life-Bearing Meteorites from Earth

Trajectories of Life-Bearing Meteorites from Earth | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
The asteroid that killed the dinosaurs must have ejected billions of tons of life-bearing rock into space. Now physicists have calculated what must have happened to it.
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Carbon nanotubes: The weird world of 'remote Joule heating'

Carbon nanotubes: The weird world of 'remote Joule heating' | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

A team of University of Maryland scientists have discovered that when electric current is run through carbon nanotubes, objects nearby heat up while the nanotubes themselves stay cool, like a toaster that burns bread without getting hot. Understanding this completely unexpected new phenomenon could lead to new ways of building computer processors that can run at higher speeds without overheating.

 

Carbon Nanotube Videos: http://tinyurl.com/72akyf3

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New device invisible to magnetic fields - magnetic cloaking

New device invisible to magnetic fields - magnetic cloaking | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
The sneaky science of "cloaking" just keeps getting richer. Physicists and engineers had already demonstrated rudimentary invisibility cloaks that can hide objects from light, sound, and water waves. Now, they've devised an "antimagnet" cloak that can shield an object from a constant magnetic field without disturbing that field. If realized, such a cloak could have medical applications, researchers say.

 

Videos on cloaking technologies: http://tinyurl.com/bpbkjqa

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10-Year-Old Colombian Girl Gives Birth to Daughter

10-Year-Old Colombian Girl Gives Birth to Daughter | Amazing Science | Scoop.it
A 10-year-old Colombian girl gave birth to a baby girl last week without any advanced care, according to a video report by Univision's Primer Impacto, making her one of the youngest mothers ever.

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Mutations behind flu spread revealed

Mutations behind flu spread revealed | Amazing Science | Scoop.it

Two scientists recently hit the headlines when they created mutant strains of H5N1 influenza, which can spread between mammals. Their experiments began when they tweaked the H5N1 virus to reproduce in a ferret’s airway. Then they introduced random alterations into the haemagglutinin (HA) protein, which the virus uses to stick to host cells. From the resulting library of mutants, the researchers isolated viruses with two mutations in HA — N224K and Q226L — which allowed the virus to stick to receptors in human tracheal cells. That is something H5N1 viruses cannot usually do.

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